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Vidiots Lives in Eagle Rock!

from The LA Times

Beloved video store Vidiots is set to reopen. How Rian Johnson and others are helping

By MARK OLSEN

A man and a woman walk under an Eagle Rock street sign and near a building with a blank marquee.
Vidiots, the long-running L.A. video store, is reopening in Eagle Rock with a restored movie theater. (Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

When Vidiots, the long-running video store in Santa Monica that had become a cultural cornerstone for the city, closed in 2017, it seemed the end of an era.

Now, on a corner in northeast Los Angeles, Vidiots is on the verge of a new beginning.

Construction is underway at the Eagle Theatre in Eagle Rock for it to become a combination 250-seat movie theater and video store, home to Vidiots’ collection of more than 50,000 titles on DVD, Blu-ray and VHS along with new programming. The project is expected to be completed and the new Vidiots is anticipated to open its doors in spring 2022.

“Even before the pandemic and lockdowns, I think that it is abundantly clear that the need for human interaction around the arts and particularly around film is really paramount to our culture and our sense of health and well-being,” said Maggie Mackay, executive director of the nonprofit Vidiots Foundation.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on July 19, 2021 by Editor

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Tarantino To The Rescue

from DEADLINE

Quentin Tarantino’s New Beverly Cinema Sets Reopening Date

By Anthony D’Alessandro

More good news for LA moviegoers: Revival house New Beverly Cinema has set a reopening date of June 1 per its Twitter account. No further details were provided about the cinema’s upcoming schedule.

The 300-seat theater opened in 1929 at Beverly Boulevard near LaBrea Boulevard in Los Angeles. The two-time Oscar winner Quentin Tarantino subsidized New Beverly owner Sherman Torgan to the tune of $5K per month to keep the location open; Torgan, who passed away in 2007, owned the theater at 7165 Beverly Blvd since 1978. Tarantino became the new landlord in the wake of Torgan’s passing, holding the line on developers who yearned to turn the venue into a Supercuts. In 2014, Tarantino became head curator with a mandate that only 16MM and 35MM prints would be shown, and jettisoning the digital projector installed by Torgan’s son Michael. The cinema reopened in December 2018 after year long enhancements.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on May 4, 2021 by Editor

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Eli Broad Gone

from DEADLINE

Eli Broad Dies: Billionaire Businessman, Philanthropist, Founder of L.A.’s Broad Museum Was 87

By Tom Tapp

Eli Broad

Businessman, philanthropist and art collector Eli Broad, who left an indelible imprint on Los Angeles’ cultural scene, died today at age 87.

Broad died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center following a long illness, according to Suzi Emmerling, spokeswoman for the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation.

Broad made his fortune building single-family homes. A New York native, he parlayed a loan from his in-laws into a homebuilding empire. He and Donald Bruce Kaufman founded KB (Kaufman & Broad) Homes in Detroit in 1956 when Broad was barely 20 years old. The firm went on to become the largest independent builder of single-family homes in the United States. It built more than 600,000 homes in the postwar boom, many of them in Southern California. He later bought Sun Life Insurance, morphing it into annuities giant SunAmerica. He sold it for $18 billion in stock in 1998. He was the first person to develop two Fortune 500 companies in different industries.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on May 1, 2021 by Editor

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3BlackDot & BavaMedia

from The Hollywood Reporter

Digital Studio 3BlackDot Inks Deal With Management Firm BavaMedia (Exclusive)

The Los Angeles-based company will provide content services to Bava’s talent roster, comprised of live-streamers and YouTube personalities.

BY TRILBY BERESFORD

Bucks Headshot
YouTuber Ryan “Bucks” Hughes is part of BavaMedia’s talent roster. BUCKS GAMING

Entertainment studio 3BlackDot has signed a one-year partnership with gaming talent management company BavaMedia.

The exclusive deal will see the Los Angeles-based company provide BavaMedia’s talent — comprised of live-streamers and YouTube personalities — with content-related services such as brand partnerships and original programming deals, as well as e-commerce opportunities designed to expand their potential for revenue in the marketplace.

BavaMedia’s talent roster includes YouTuber GhostNinja, who has over 4 million subscribers on the video-sharing platform; and PackAPuncher, who is nearing 3 million; as well as Bucks, FreshPanda, Ahrora and Nerpah, whose YouTube subscriber counts are also climbing.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on April 12, 2021 by Editor

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Post-COVID Pico

from The LA Times

A year of change on Pico Boulevard

Map shows the path of Pico Boulevard from Santa Monica to Downtown L.A.

Los Angeles imposed coronavirus restrictions on restaurants, bars, gyms and other businesses on March 15, 2020. It was the beginning of a year of loss, upheaval and constant adaptation.

Public health rules kept evolving. Relief programs brought help for some but only red tape for others. Supply chains were a mess. There were shoppers who feared even entering stores and customers who crowded newly built patios.

Some businesses cut hours, services and staff, or closed altogether. Many have survived beyond their expectations.

A trip down Pico Boulevard shows how much has changed one year later.

[ click to view at LAT ]

Posted on March 17, 2021 by Editor

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Magnes and The Real Porsche

from Inside Hook

Street Racing Through LA With Magnus Walker, The World’s Most Notorious Porsche Collector

The stories behind Magnus Walker and Daniel Malikyar’s new photo series are almost better than the images themselves. Almost.

BY ALEX LAUER

Magnus Walker Porsche 277 in the LA River
Magnus Walker, left, in his 277, a highly modified Porsche 911. Daniel Malikyar via Santo Gallery

“Yesterday I drove a $4 million Bugatti Chiron Pur Sport, which was really impressive,” says Magnus Walker, “but it’s a car that is way out of my league.” 

From looking at his Instagram, you wouldn’t believe any car is out of Magnus Walker’s league. One day he’s cruising around in a six-figure Ferrari in Los Angeles, another he’s testing the chops of the new Ford Bronco in the middle of nowhere. You see, Walker has become one of the most recognizable Porsche collectors and customizers in the world — known as much for his signature “Outlaw” builds as his signature dreadlocks and Gandalf beard — and with that repute comes the opportunity to drive all manner of rarefied automobiles, if not own them. Despite that access, there’s still plenty left on his vehicular bucket list, and that’s where Daniel Malikyar comes in.

Together, the two collaborated on a new photography series in which they set out to “[capture] the fine art of urban racing” in L.A. The images, which are available for purchase through Santo Gallery in limited-edition prints starting February 19, sit at the intersection of old-school hot rods in car magazines and new-school car porn on Instagram feeds. That dichotomy comes straight from the creators: Walker is a 53-year-old gearhead and British expat, while Malikyar is a 26-year-old Afghan-American virtuoso, the co-founder of Santo with a portfolio of gripping photography and film work that belies his years. 

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on March 3, 2021 by Editor

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When Eddie Loved Dave

from The LA Times

An unlikely Pasadena love story: The high-school bromance of Eddie Van Halen and David Lee Roth

By GREG RENOFF

Eddie Van Halen shredding with his band in 1975.
Eddie Van Halen shredding with his band in 1975.(Kevin Estrada Archives)

Early in the summer of 1973, singer David Lee Roth and guitarist Eddie Van Halen performed together for the first time. Playing in front of an audience of buzzed students from John Muir, Blair and Pasadena high schools in an east Pasadena backyard, this embryonic version of Van Halen, then called Mammoth, blasted out songs by Black Sabbath, Grand Funk Railroad and Cream, rattling windows and shattering eardrums while party attendees chugged keg beer.

Last week, Eddie Van Halen died from cancer, at age 65, and tributes to his transformational musical contributions poured in from around the world. But long before anyone outside of the San Gabriel Valley had heard of the band, this pairing of two aspiring musicians who had little in common save their long hair drew together a generation of hard-rock-loving SoCal teens.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on October 15, 2020 by Editor

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Happy Easter

via GIPHY

Posted on April 12, 2020 by Editor

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“It had nothing to do with a stack of records. If it were IHOP, everyone would think that it looks like a stack of pancakes.”

from Billboard

Capitol Records Architect Louis Naidorf Sets the Record Straight on Myth of Tower’s Iconic Design

by Pamela Chelin

Capitol Records building in Hollywood, Calif.
Capitol Records building in Hollywood, Calif.
Bettmann/Getty Images

“It had nothing to do with a stack of records. If it were IHOP, everyone would think that it looks like a stack of pancakes.”

The 63-year-old Capitol Records Building may look like a stack of records with a rooftop spire resembling a phonograph needle, but according to its designer, 91-year-old architect Louis Naidorf, that’s just a coincidence.

“I designed the bloody thing,” laughs Naidorf, speaking over the phone from his home in Santa Rosa, California. “Unequivocally, it had nothing to do with a stack of records. If it were IHOP, everyone would think that it looks like a stack of pancakes or plates. If it were Firestone, everyone would think that it looks like a stack of inner tubes. There are lots of things that look like that.”

[ click to continue reading at Billboard ]

Posted on March 11, 2020 by Editor

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A MILLION LITTLE PIECES Premiere

from Instagram

[ click to view on Instagram ]

Posted on December 6, 2019 by Editor

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Bash @ 3BlackDot

from Shock Ya!

Swissx CBD Wellness Benefits Highlighted in Co-Sponsorship of AKON Lighting L.A. Music and Art Event

By Karen Benardello

Akon and Alki David
AKON w Alki David CEO of Swissx CBD

Downtown Los Angeles was introduced to the wellness benefits of Swissx and its CBD products this weekend, as Swissx Labs served as a co-sponsor of Akon Lighting L.A. Just before its launch, Swissx CEO Alki David announced that the company would sponsor the urban conscious music and art event, which was hosted by Grammy Award-nominated singer, Akon.

During Akon Lighting L.A., which benefited AKON Lighting Africa, also highlighted how Swissx is the purest and most respected brand available on the market. All Swissx products come from specially developed strains of hemp grown and processed in Switzerland. The brand counts such celebrities as Tommy Chong, Scott Disick, Dave Navarro, Donatella Versace, Ray J and Jonathan Rhys Myers as fans, and Snoop Dogg has even praised Swissx on social media.

Tonight at 9pm, Snoop Dogg will hit the stage when he hosts the special set DJ SNOOPADELIC.

The all-vegan festival also features kundalini yoga, meditation and indigenous people ceremonies.

The event continues today until 11PM, Saturday the 16th.

3BLACKDOT is at 1580 Jesse Street, L.A. CA 90021 For tickets and more information, here.

[ click to read at Shock Ya! ]

Posted on November 16, 2019 by Editor

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Simon T – Hero

from The Bakersfield Californian

Inside a wealthy LA man’s effort to help pilots fight wildfires from a remote mountain base

By Matt Stiles Los Angeles Times (TNS)

LOS ANGELES — Perched atop the Santa Monica Mountains, there’s a prime chunk of real estate with stunning ocean views that’s owned by a wealthy former radio executive.

You won’t find a palatial mansion or an infinity pool there, however.

Instead, the former executive and county firefighters have transformed this picturesque property into a remote base for helicopters to refill their water tanks — a spot that’s helping prevent small fires from turning catastrophic.

Known as 69 Bravo, it’s the result of an unusual partnership between the executive, whose legal name is Simon T, and the Los Angeles County Fire Department. The county’s helicopters rely on the base as a quick and easy spot to refill water during blazes, such as the Palisades fire last month.

“You look at what this gives us, for all the residents that we serve,” said Jon O’Brien, a deputy chief at the department. “It’s unparalleled. I don’t think you can place a value on having a site like this.”

[ click to continue reading at The Bakersfield Californian ]

Posted on November 5, 2019 by Editor

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Lena On LA

from AdWeek

Lena Waithe on Why LA Was the Perfect Place to Make Her Dreams Come True

The prolific writer, producer and actor’s first feature film is debuting next month

By Lisa Lacy

Lena Waithe
Lena Waithe moved to Los Angeles from Chicago in 2006.
Photography by Lelanie Foster; styled by and wearing Richfresh;
hair by Dominique Evans; makeup by Rebekah Aladdin

Lena Waithe says she moved to Los Angeles from Chicago in 2006 knowing she wanted to conquer it. And with 22 projects in active development with some of the biggest names in the business—including Amazon, BET, Disney, HBO, Netflix, Showtime and Universal—as well as a star-making turn on the Netflix series Master of None, which earned her an Emmy, she’s arguably done just that.

Season 3 of The Chi, a drama Waithe created for Showtime about the South Side of Chicago, is now in production. She did a food tour of L.A. with David Chang for his new Netflix limited series Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner, premiering Oct. 23 (the show also features Chrissy Teigen and Kate McKinnon). And next month, she’s bringing her talents to the big screen with the film Queen & Slim, for which she penned the screenplay (it’s based on a story she wrote with author James Frey). The movie, about what happens to a couple on a first date after they get pulled over by the police, stars Jodie Turner-Smith and Get Out’s Daniel Kaluuya in the title roles.

[ click to continue reading at AdWeek ]

Posted on October 13, 2019 by Editor

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Bojack Angeleno

from Curbed

‘BoJack Horseman’ is the only show that really gets my city

Tucked into the often-bleak narrative are disarmingly familiar glimpses of Los Angeles life

By Alissa Walker

This is a still from the Netflix series Bojack Horseman. The still is of apartment complex in Los Angeles. There is a sign on the side of one of the buildings that reads: Le Triste apartments. A blue car is parked outside of the building. It is night.
From the dingbat apartments to the ever-present freeways, BoJack Horseman nails the tiniest details of LA’s urban streetscape. Netflix

To live in Los Angeles means forever catching glimpses of your street or favorite restaurant staged as a stand-in for someplace else. Moving around town becomes an exercise in avoiding those film shoots, a constant reminder that we reside on a giant soundstage, where at any given moment, a beloved block or building is being carefully snipped from the surrounding context.

In the last few years, however, shows have been set in actual LA neighborhoods, with characters referencing real places, sometimes with stunning geographic accuracy. There’s the show Love, which takes place in a well-known apartment complex in the Valley. In Transparent, the neighborhoods where the family members live, from Silver Lake to Marina del Rey, provide cues about their characters. LA’s noir past intersects with present-day addresses in the thriller Bosch. Issa Rae’s Insecure is probably the best example of the genre, offering a look at everyday life in South LA with locations as mundane as a Rite-Aid pharmacy.

But BoJack Horseman—the animated Netflix show by writer Raphael Bob-Waksberg and artist Lisa Hanawalt, who were high school friends—is the first show to create an entire Los Angeles universe that feels like it was made for people in LA.

For people who don’t live here, BoJack Horseman might appear to be an endless string of cliches: a narcissistic washed-up sitcom star (who is also a horse) voiced by Will Arnett, colonnades of palm trees, candy-colored convertibles, and jabs at celebrity culture. But tucked into the narrative are disarmingly familiar glimpses of actual Los Angeles—well, Los Angeles if it were mostly occupied by animals.

Every street scene sends me scrambling to hit pause. There are LA landmarks like Chateau MarmosetFred SeagullParrotmount Studios, and Moose-O & Frank Grill, but it doesn’t stop with obvious parodies—next door to Moose-O’s is Garcetti & Meatballs, the winkingest nod to our Italian-Jewish-Mexican American mayor. Billboard icon Angelyne is portrayed as an angelfish. Even small neighborhood businesses get cameos, like l.a. Aye-AyeworksSecret Hindquarters and confusingly named local grocery chains. A dutifully updated Instagram devoted to the hidden jokes has become the best way to catch the ones I’ve missed.

[ click to continue reading at Curbed ]

Posted on September 7, 2019 by Editor

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Dark Fate

from DEADLINE

‘Terminator: Dark Fate’: James Cameron On Rewired Franchise, Possible New Trilogy

By Geoff Boucher

EXCLUSIVE: James Cameron understands better than anyone that revisiting the past to alter the course of history is a dicey proposition at best, but that hasn’t stopped the Hollywood titan from taking on his latest cinematic mission: returning to The Terminator franchise that gave him the first signature success of his history-making career.

“It’s special,” Cameron said of the Terminator success that propelled him toward ever-grander spectacle projects like Aliens, The Abyss, Titanic, and Avatar. Sci-fi’s greatest showman moved on from his Skynet series in 1991, but now he’s reunited with his first great cinematic brand through Terminator: Dark Fatethe Skydance Productions and Paramount Pictures release that hits theaters November 1.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on August 29, 2019 by Editor

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Machete-maritan!

from Reuters

Actor Danny Trejo of ‘Machete’ fame pulls young boy from overturned car

LOS ANGELES, Aug 7 (Reuters) – Hollywood actor Danny Trejo, known for his tough-guy roles in such films as “Machete,” helped rescue a young boy who was trapped in a car that overturned in a Los Angeles traffic collision on Wednesday.

Trejo, 75, told television station KABC-TV he was on his way to an auto mechanic in L.A.’s Sylmar neighborhood when he saw a motorist run a red light and crash into another car, which flipped over onto its roof in the intersection.

The boy, strapped into his car seat in the back of the car, and his grandmother, who had been driving, were both trapped in the overturned, partially crushed vehicle.

“He was panicked, and I said, ‘OK, we have to use our superpowers,’ and so he screamed, ‘Superpowers!’ and we started yelling, ‘Superpowers,'” Trejo recounted. “We got kind of, like, a bond, I guess.”

[ click to continue reading at Reuters ]

Posted on August 11, 2019 by Editor

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Once Upon A Tarantino

from The New Yorker

Quentin Tarantino Tweaks History in “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood”

Forging a style from the scraps of a consuming culture, the director alters the history of the Manson Family murders.

By Anthony Lane

Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio star in Quentin Tarantino’s film. Illustration by Adrian Tomine

Cars and songs. To be exact: the sight of a car bowling along, at speed, while a song cries out on the soundtrack. That, in the end, is what Quentin Tarantino loves more than anything; more than crappy old TV shows, more than boxes of cereal, more than violence so rabid that it practically foams, and more, if you can believe it, than the joys of logorrhea. His latest work, “Once Upon a Time . . . in Hollywood,” is a declaration of that love. There are many scenes in which the characters—folks like Rick Dalton (Leonardo DiCaprio) and Cliff Booth (Brad Pitt)—motor around Los Angeles without a care. To call those scenes the best thing in the film is not a slight upon Tarantino. As he, of all people, is aware, they are the kinds of scene that play in our movie memories, years after the event, on a helpless and happy loop.

Rick Dalton is an actor, just about. It’s 1969, and he’s worried that, sooner or later, somebody will say that he used to be big in pictures. He’s not yet over the hill, but he’s well past the peak. Having starred in “Bounty Law,” on television, in the nineteen-fifties, he is reduced to playing heavies and scumbags; and their sole purpose, as an agent named Marvin Schwarzs (Al Pacino) explains to Rick, is to be bested by the hero. Getting bested is the worst. Viewers come to see you as expendable. Still, it’s a job, and Rick likes nothing more, even now, than sitting down with his buddy Cliff and a six-pack of cold ones, watching an episode of “The F.B.I.,” and waiting for the moment when the villain—Rick, of course—gets to deliver his scumbag line, with a sneer on his scumbag face.

[ click to continue reading at TNY ]

Posted on July 26, 2019 by Editor

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Norco ’80

from Inside Hook

Inside One of the Most Spectacular and Dangerous Bank Heists in U.S. History

An excerpt from Peter Houlahan’s thrilling new book, “Norco ’80”

BY PETER HOULAHAN

Inside One of the Most Spectacular and Dangerous Bank Heists in U.S. History

Inside the Mira Loma House, George Smith and Chris Harven had been smoking weed and working their way through a six pack of Budweiser to keep their nerves down and their courage up. Laid out on the carpet of a back bedroom, an arsenal of weapons and survival supplies were grouped by purpose and ready to be loaded into a half dozen military duffel bags. The two yellow McDonald walkie-talkie radios to be used between Billy in the getaway van, George inside the bank sat off to the side.

Chris, Russ, and George would each enter the bank armed with semi-automatic assault rifles, Chris with his HK93, Russ with the Colt Shorty AR-15, and George with the Heckler .308. Manny would have the riot gun.

The serial numbers on all the guns had been covered up with electrical tape to avoid being readable on bank surveillance tapes. Each of the men would carry at least one side arm, George with a Browning .45 semi-automatic pistol shouldered holstered and another at his hip. Both George and Chris had hundreds of additional rounds of ammunition in fully loaded magazines strapped across their chests. In the front seat of the getaway van, driver Billy Delgado would also have a Colt AR-15 to go along with the .45 Colt automatic handgun tucked into a holster strapped around his right ankle.

For the rifles, George and Chris had made dozens of “jungle clips” allowing them to eject an empty magazine, flip it over, and load a full one in its place in a matter of seconds. Piggybacking three forty-round magazines together up-down-up as George and Chris had done gave the weapon a devastating 120-round capacity, which they were capable of emptying on a target in a little over a minute. Chris Harven alone had seventeen forty-round magazines: 680 extra rounds in total. In addition to this, boxes of extra ammunition, over 3,000 rounds of varying calibers, had already been packed into duffel bags.

Zipped up in two of the bags destined for the trunk of each cold getaway car was survival gear that included map books, compass, water purification tablets, field glasses, mess kits, gas masks, emergency blankets, extra clothing, and insulin vials and three syringes for Russell Harven. Half a dozen hunting knives, a nine-inch Bowie knife, and two machetes were split among survival kits. A Remington hunting rifle with scope and hundreds of rounds of H&H .357 cartridges would go into each trunk. The H&H .357 cartridge was designed primarily for taking down large and dangerous game. In other words, an “elephant gun.”

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on July 12, 2019 by Editor

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Roth, Frey, Easton-Ellis

from Facebook

Posted on July 6, 2019 by Editor

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Alie Rivier Gutman to VP at Andrew Stearn Productions

from Deadline

Andrew Stearn Launches Production Company With Overall Deal At ABC Studios

By Nellie Andreeva

Alie Rivier Gutman

Former Working Title Television U.S. and John Wells Productions president Andrew Stearn is launching his own production company, Andrew Stearn Productions. It will be based at ABC Studios, a division of Disney Television Studios, with an overall deal.

At ABC Studios, Stearn will be joined by Alie Rivier Gutman, whom he has hired as VP for Andrew Stearn Prods. She most recently served as Director of Development and Production for James Frey’s Full Fathom Five, where she worked in TV and film on projects including the series Relationship Status (Verizon Go90),American Gothic (CBS), The Kicks(Amazon) and the feature film Eat, Brains, Love. 

[ click to continue reading at Deadline ]

Posted on May 29, 2019 by Editor

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Frieze LA Destroyed

from The Art Newspaper

Frieze LA diary: Leibovitz’s photo finish, Destroyer smashes it and a mushroom-powered rocket (doesn’t) take off

Plus, Suzanne Jackson’s modest gallery revival

MAXWELL WILLIAMS

Destroyer playing at the opening for Friedrich Kunath’s monograph, Sincerely Yours at Blum & Poe Photo: Max Williams

Destroyer smashes it at Blum & Poe

There’s a certain candor in Friedrich Kunath’s paintings, which often have text crossing lush, romantic landscapes like an aerial banner with no airplane, that pairs well with music. For the launch of his monograph, I Don’t Worry Anymore, which includes contributions from a substantial cast of characters—the poet Ariana Reines, the novelist James Frey, and the former tennis player-turned-art collector John McEnroe—Kunath invited the Canadian troubadour Daniel Bejar, aka Destroyer, to perform in front of one of those dreamy landscapes. The upstairs gallery at Blum & Poe was packed (whether there were more people there to support Kunath or to see Destroyer, we may never know) and Destroyer’s songs felt exactly right: romantic without being mawkish, funny without being inane. The musician and the painter were a pairing no DJ could have mixed better. “This is big for me,” said Kunath, who was a huge fan of the musician. Bejar played a mix of old and new songs while propped on a stool on top of a bear rug with a camel sculpture in front of him. “I want to thank Friedrich for letting me out tonight,” he joked. “It’s nice to get out of Canada once in a while.”

[ click to continue reading at The Art Newspaper ]

Posted on March 2, 2019 by Editor

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Les secrets du Chateau

from Vanity Fair

Secrets of the Chateau Marmont

As the ultimate movie-colony clubhouse turns 90, Mark Rozzo prowls among the bungalows and crannies off Sunset Boulevard where mega-stars and ne’er-do-wells, from Garbo and Harlow to Lindsay and Britney, have whiled away nearly a century of enchanted evenings.

by MARK ROZZO

A photo of The Chateau Marmont.Photograph by Nikolas Koenig/OTTO.

In the late 1920s, as Hollywood was booming and Beverly Hills was sprouting a bumper crop of movie-colony mansions, the stretch between them was little more than sagebrush and scrub. It was known as No-Man’s Land. Winding through it was a forlorn trail with a presumptuous name: Sunset Boulevard. Where this unpaved road met Marmont Lane, catty-corner to an oasis-like complex of villas in mid-construction called the Garden of Allah, the attorney and developer Fred Horowitz became mesmerized by a barren hillside. One day in November of 1926, the story goes, he rolled up to the unpromising site in a town car, pulled out a snapshot he’d taken in the Loire Valley of the Château d’Amboise (where Catherine de Medici and Henry II of France shacked up in the 16th century), and, in a title-card moment from a silent movie, shouted: “YES.

Horowitz had found his spot. Here, on the north side of Sunset, he would build a brawny, earthquake-proof, seven-story, Manhattan-worthy apartment house in a fairy-tale French Gothic style: thick, buff-colored walls, spiky turrets, steep roofs, arched windows, raftered ceilings, and a vaulted colonnade, with the two flanks of the building folding in upon a grassy courtyard, all adding up to a veritable fortress of luxury, taste, and fantasy. His California castle—“distinctively furnished and decorated,” as the early ad copy put it—would have state-of-the-art kitchens and bathrooms. Promising Park Avenue-style discretion and privacy, it would be a sanctuary for New Yorkers moving West and for movie machersdesiring East Coast polish. Horowitz toyed with names: Chateau Sunset? Chateau Hollywood? He went with Chateau Marmont. It sounded French. Along with the Garden of Allah, the Chateau Marmont turned that faceless frontier into what would become the Sunset Strip.

[ click to continue reading at VF ]

Posted on February 8, 2019 by Editor

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Emma Roberts Reads KATERINA

from Just Jared

Emma Roberts Is All Smiles After Purchasing James Frey’s ‘Katerina’ in LA!

Emma Roberts Is All Smiles After Purchasing James Frey's 'Katerina' in LA!

Emma Roberts has some holiday reading in store!

The 27-year-old American Horror Storyactress was spotted heading out after purchasing a copy of James Frey‘s Katerina on Wednesday (December 26) in Los Angeles.

The novel, released earlier in 2018, is described as a sweeping love story alternating between 1992 Paris and Los Angeles in 2018.

[ click to continue reading at JustJared.com ]

Posted on December 27, 2018 by Editor

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RIVAL X RAZER Holiday Showdown Tournament

from PRNewswire

RIVAL X RAZER Holiday Showdown Tournament Culminates In $150,000 Prize Pool, Finals Hosted By AT&T In Los Angeles

3BLACKDOT, Razer, and AT&T host the top players who will compete on the Razer Phone 2 in final match in Los Angeles alongside guest influencers

LOS ANGELES, Dec. 7, 2018 /PRNewswire/ — Razer™, the world’s leading lifestyle brand for gamers is collaborating with 3BLACKDOT, the leading Influencer-driven studio, and AT&T to produce the RIVAL X RAZER Holiday Showdown. This two-week event will feature 3BLACKDOT and Section Studios highly rated arena battle mobile game, “RIVAL: CRIMSON X CHAOS.” Participants will have the opportunity to play RIVAL: CRIMSON X CHAOS for a chance to win over $150,000 in total cash, Razer Phone 2, and other prizes.

The RIVAL X RAZER Holiday Showdown will take place from Thursday, December 6th and will conclude with a final event on December 15th at the new AT&T store in Los Angeles, California.  From December 6th to December 11th fans looking to compete in this exciting event can download RIVAL: Crimson X Chaos from the Google Play Store and Apple App Store and compete in daily quests and leaderboard challenges for a chance to win daily cash and in-game prizes.  The top 24 players will be flown to Los Angeles to compete in the championship event. “Since launching Rival: Crimson x Chaos, fans around the world and our 3BLACKDOT influencers have been playing Rival and absolutely love this game,” says Rahshiene Taha, VP of Marketing at 3BLACKDOT. “The Rival x Razer Holiday Showdown takes it to a new level. There nothing like the energy of a live event that brings fans and our 3BLACKDOT influencers together and we couldn’t be more excited!”

Retailers and carriers around the world are making significant efforts in attracting the fast-growing mobile gaming community to their stores with tournaments, large prize pools, and other forms of entertainment.  Michael Breslin, Razer Mobile’s Global Head of Sales & Marketing, said: “Mobile gaming is the fastest growing platform in the space, with mobile gamers logging over 200% more game time than through any other platform,” adding “since Razer Phone 2 was designed specifically with mobile gaming in mind, we wanted to partner with companies whose mission to entertain and engage mobile gamers aligned with ours, and we found that in 3BLACKDOT and AT&T.”

“We’re thrilled to help bring the RIVAL X RAZER Holiday Showdown to gamers, culminating with the championship event at our newest L.A. retail location,” said Shiz Suzuki, assistant vice president of AT&T Sponsorships and Experiential Marketing. “Our commitment to gamers is all about enhancing their experience. We’re excited to see that come to life through this tournament where fans will have the opportunity to win cash and prizes, including the Razer Phone 2 –  just like the pros.”

[ click to continue reading at PRNewswire ]

Posted on December 7, 2018 by Editor

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Sunset

from The New York Times

Where the Real Los Angeles Meets the Dream

On Sunset Boulevard, two Californias — the lived place and the one seen on screen — run parallel for 22 snaking miles.

Photographs by Jake Michaels / Text by  / Produced by

Like Broadway in New York and Ocean Drive in Miami, Sunset Boulevard in Los Angeles is both a real street and a myth. It’s where you go to gas up at the Arco station (5007 Sunset Boulevard) or grab a meal at In-N-Out Burger (7009 Sunset), and also to chase the dream of fame and eternal sunshine. Remarkably, Sunset lives up to the postcard.

Drive east to west, from where the street begins downtown to where it ends 22 twisting miles later at the Pacific Ocean, and at any point along the route, you will see the images that movies, TV shows and magazines have implanted in your brain.

In hip and historically Mexican Echo Park and Silver Lake, you’ll find trendy boutiques beside a 99 Cents Only store (3612 Sunset), and cool kids scarfing down tacos at Guisados (1261 Sunset).

In Hollywood, there are always weird Hollywood people, and tourists hoping to see weird Hollywood people, walking around near where Sunset meets Vine.

Moving west into Beverly Hills and Bel-Air, the street becomes wide and lush and curving. The sidewalks and pedestrians disappear, and the wealthy residents in their mansions hide from the celebrity-home bus tours behind walls of hedgerow — the Sunset of “Sunset Boulevard” and “Million Dollar Listing Los Angeles.”

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on January 22, 2018 by Editor

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Crazy College Kids From The Past

from The LA Times

In an era of USC-UCLA pranks, one stood out. Sixty years later, its mystery is solved

by Zach Helfand

USC prankstersFrom left to right: Dave Visel, Mike Loshin, Wally Karabian, Jerry VanWert and Steve Marienhoff. (Photo courtesy of Maria Aparicio)

A septuagenarian professor and former USC student, having caught wind of a forthcoming story in the Los Angeles Times, recently sent a cryptic email to the newspaper.

Sixty years ago, the professor, Dayle Barnes, belonged to an organization at USC called the Trojan Squires, which pulled off one of the most memorable in a long line of pranks in USC’s rivalry with UCLA. For the game at the Coliseum in 1957, UCLA’s student section had planned a series of card stunts. The UCLA students were to hold up placards that would combine to form Bruins-friendly words and pictures.

Except when the students actually did hold up their cards, they had been altered by a band of USC saboteurs. In each stunt, the unwitting UCLA students revealed a different pro-USC message. It caused such a stir that Sports Illustrated wrote about the prank — without interviewing its creators.

Barnes wrote in the email that reporting about the prank’s creators would be a “tough assignment” given “the complete secrecy with which the clandestine group of Trojan Squires” operated.

He explained that though he was part of the Squires, the prank was conceived and executed by a small, elite unit within the organization, operating under deep cover. Barnes didn’t know their identities.

“That is not to deny, however, that more than a few of that year’s membership were eminently qualified, by background and personality, successfully to conduct a covert assignment,” he wrote.

The mystery endured among the dwindling population of USC and UCLA alumni who keep score of such pranks. There would be no answer for 60 years.

Until now.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on November 14, 2017 by Editor

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Paglia on Hefner

from The Hollywood Reporter

Camille Paglia on Hugh Hefner’s Legacy, Trump’s Masculinity and Feminism’s Sex Phobia

by Jeanie Pyun

With the death of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner on Sept. 27, cultural historian and contrarian feminist Camille Paglia spoke to The Hollywood Reporter in an exclusive interview on topics ranging from what Hef’s choice of the bunny costume revealed about him to the current “dreary” state of relationships between the sexes.

Have you ever been to a party at the Playboy Mansion?

No, I’m not a partygoer! (Laughs.)

So let me just ask: Was Hugh Hefner a misogynist?

Absolutely not! The central theme of my wing of pro-sex feminism is that all celebrations of the sexual human body are positive. Second-wave feminism went off the rails when it was totally unable to deal with erotic imagery, which has been a central feature of the entire history of Western art ever since Greek nudes.

So let’s dig in a little — what would you say was Playboy’s cultural impact?

Hugh Hefner absolutely revolutionized the persona of the American male. In the post-World War II era, men’s magazines were about hunting and fishing or the military, or they were like Esquire, erotic magazines with a kind of European flair.

Hefner reimagined the American male as a connoisseur in the continental manner, a man who enjoyed all the fine pleasures of life, including sex. Hefner brilliantly put sex into a continuum of appreciative response to jazz, to art, to ideas, to fine food. This was something brand new. Enjoying fine cuisine had always been considered unmanly in America. Hefner updated and revitalized the image of the British gentleman, a man of leisure who is deft at conversation — in which American men have never distinguished themselves — and the art of seduction, which was a sport refined by the French.

Hefner’s new vision of American masculinity was part of his desperate revision of his own Puritan heritage. On his father’s side, he descended directly from William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower and was governor of Plymouth Colony, the major settlement of New England Puritans.

But Hefner’s worldview was already dated by the explosion of the psychedelic 1960s. The anything-goes, free-love atmosphere — illustrated by all that hedonistic rolling around in the mud at Woodstock in 1969 — made the suave Hefner style seem old-fashioned and buttoned up. Nevertheless, I have always taken the position that the men’s magazines — from the glossiest and most sophisticated to the rawest and raunchiest — represent the brute reality of sexuality. Pornography is not a distortion. It is not a sexist twisting of the facts of life but a kind of peephole into the roiling, primitive animal energies that are at the heart of sexual attraction and desire.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Editor

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The What?

from KCET

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying ‘the’ Before Freeway Numbers

by Nathan Masters

1939_parkway_plan_1920.jpgThis 1939 plan, developed by the city of Los Angeles, refers to its proposed freeways by name rather than number. Priority parkways are highlighted in color in this 1943 reprinting of the plan from “Freeways for the Region.” Courtesy of the Metro Transportation Library and Archive.

Southern Californians have a distinctive – “Saturday Night Live’s” Fred Armisen and Kristen Wiig might say funny – way of giving directions. To get from Santa Monica to Hollywood, take the 10 to the 110 to the 101. Burbank to San Diego? The 134 to the 5. And, if you can, always avoid the 405.

Why the definite articles? After all, a resident of the Bay Area enjoys coastal drives along “101” or takes “80 east” to Sacramento. Most of North America, in fact, omits the “the” before route numbers.

The answer begins with the region’s early embrace of the freeway. Long before the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act of 1956 gave most U.S. cities their first freeways, Los Angeles had built several. These weren’t simply extensions of federal interstate highways through the city; they were local routes, engineered to carry local traffic and (partly) paid for by local funds. It only made sense that, as they opened one by one, they’d get local names, ones that succinctly denoted their route or destination. The freeway through the Cahuenga Pass thus became the Cahuenga Pass Freeway, and Angelenos knew the freeway to San Bernardino as the San Bernardino Freeway.

State highway officials did affix route numbers to these freeways. But clarity dictated that Southern Californians continue to use their descriptive names. In their early years, most Los Angeles-area freeways bore signs for multiple numbered highway routes. The Pasadena Freeway, for example, was Route 6, 66, and 99, all at once. The Harbor Freeway carried both Route 6 and Route 11. The Hollywood, Route 66 and 101. Who wouldn’t prefer the simplicity of a name over a confusing array of numbers?

[ click to continue reading at KCET ]

Posted on September 14, 2017 by Editor

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No drones L.A.!

from The Los Angeles Times

Should the LAPD use drones? Here’s what’s behind the heated debate

by Kate Mather

For more than three years, a pair of drones donated to the Los Angeles Police Department was locked away, collecting dust after a public outcry over the idea of police using the controversial technology.

Seattle police saw a similar backlash when they wanted to use the devices, grounding their drone program before it even took off. And recently, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s use of a drone has been criticized by activists as well as civilian oversight commissioners who want the agency to stop.

On Tuesday, the LAPD again waded into the heated debate, saying the department wanted to test the use of drones in a one-year pilot program.

Drones have been hailed by law enforcement across the country as a valuable technology that could help find missing hikers or monitor armed suspects without jeopardizing the safety of officers. But efforts to deploy the unmanned aircraft have frequently drawn fierce criticism from privacy advocates or police critics for whom the devices stir Orwellian visions of inappropriate — or illegal — surveillance and fears of military-grade, weaponized drones patrolling the skies.

The LAPD saw that resistance Tuesday even before department brass unveiled details of their proposal to the Police Commission. About three dozen activists gathered before the board’s morning meeting to denounce any use of drones by the department. When the presentation ended, some of those activists leapt to their feet.

“Drone-free LAPD, no drones L.A.!” they chanted.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on August 16, 2017 by Editor

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Angelyne Identified

from The Hollywood Reporter

The Mystery of L.A. Billboard Diva Angelyne’s Real Identity Is Finally Solved

by Gary Baum

An Angelyne billboard in the 1990s.Scott McKiernan/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Way before Paris Hilton and Kim Kardashian, the enigmatic blonde bombshell was famous for being famous, perpetually driving the streets of Hollywood in that pink Corvette. But her true identity has remained secret all these years … until now.

“Would you be interested in a story on Angelyne’s true identity?” the man wrote last fall under a pseudonym, referring to the enigmatic L.A. billboard diva who has been a pop culture icon of self-creation and self-marketing since the early 1980s — and is now regarded as a forerunner to Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian and every personal-brand hustler on social media. “I have many details on her life — all well documented — from when her parents met to early adulthood. It’s very different from her public, concocted story — and more interesting.”

Angelyne is one of the vanishingly few contemporary public figures whose background has remained shrouded in mystery, along with the conceptual artist Banksy, Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto and aircraft hijacker D.B. Cooper. The man, who claimed to work in an undefined role for the federal government, said he was a hobbyist genealogist, occasionally taking on paid assignments in the field as an amusing side gig. A few years earlier, he’d decided it’d be fun to set himself the challenge of cracking Angelyne’s case. “And I did,” he explained.

Later, at the 101 Coffee Shop in Hollywood, the genealogist — who looks like Michael Kelly’s contained political operative Doug Stamper from House of Cards — unfurled an elaborate story of Angelyne’s past, based on material he contended he’d enterprisingly pulled and synthesized from a global network of public databases. He laid down a folded printout of a row of yearbook photos.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on August 4, 2017 by Editor

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Russo Bros.

from DEADLINE

Fox Sets Russo Brothers In Co-Finance & WW Distribution Deal For New Movie Projects

by Mike Fleming Jr

Jonathan Hordle/REX/Shutterstock

EXCLUSIVE: Avengers: Infinity War directors Joe and Anthony Russo are zeroing in on a major deal with 20th Century Fox for their unnamed production company that will fully launch in January after they complete back-to-back Avengers sequels. Sources said the Russo Brothers are closing a long term non-exclusive pact for Fox to co-finance and distribute worldwide features generated by the new venture. The company will have put pictures included, and the venture will provide the other half of the financing for its films. I understand there was competition among studios to land the deal.

The Russo Brothers had a comfort level with and respect for Fox film chief Stacey Snider that goes back to her days at Universal. Snider was the entry point, and they met and hit it off with production chief Emma Watts, sources said. The duo has been working on the launch of this venture for over a year, with an eye toward directing films and producing others, and creating a feeder system for emerging talent. The Fox deal will allow them to start as a funded mini-major.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on July 25, 2017 by Editor

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Romero Gone

from Deadline Hollywood

George A. Romero Dies: ‘Night Of The Living Dead’ Director Was 77

by Greg Evans

George A. Romero, the director who all but invented the modern zombie genre with his 1968 horror classic Night of the Living Dead, has died at 77 of lung cancer.

Infused with social commentary and a realistic, midnight-movie terror, Romero’s brazenly stark thriller, and the sequels that followed, made as large an impact on the genre and a culture’s nightmares as any horror film since the Universal Studios monster chillers of the 1930s.

The Pittsburgh native’s low-budget, black and white film went from cult favorite to blockbuster franchise with Romero’s 1978 sequel Dawn of the Dead, 1985’s Day of the Dead (1985), Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2007) and finally 2009’s Survival of the Dead. His take on the vampire genre, Martin, was released in 1978, and he wrote the 1990 Night remake, directed by Tom Savini.

As a producer, Romero delivered TV’s seminal 1980s horror anthology Tales From the Dark Side.

“Hard to quantify how much he inspired me & what he did for cinema,” tweeted Hostel director Eli Roth. (See other Hollywood reactions here.)

[ click to read full obit at Deadline ]

Posted on July 16, 2017 by Editor

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Mahoney

from The Hollywood Reporter

Meet the High Priest of Hollywood Tattoo Artists

by Gary Baum

Mahoney doesn’t share prices but larger custom pieces cost thousands, depending on the time required.Photographed By Brian Bowen Smith

Johnny Depp calls him brother. Adele and Angelina are clients. After 40 years of body ink, Mark Mahoney, whose style now dominates the craft, has become an icon of the Sunset Strip.

A life spent injecting ink into flesh has taken Mark Mahoney, Hollywood’s most influential and respected tattoo artist, across the human experience. He began tattooing drunk Hell’s Angels beneath a swastika flag in a Massachusetts motorcycle club, then made his way for a time to Manhattan, where he set up shop at the bohemian Chelsea Hotel. (Sid Vicious was a client.) Now, with the fully mainstream acceptance of what was an outlaw aesthetic when he started in the business 40 years ago, he finds his booked-six-months-out appointment calendar filled with green-juice-toting “mothers and their daughters from Beverly Hills. I feel like I’m dreaming.”

Also stars: David Beckham is covered in Mahoney’s work, a fine-line style involving solely black-and-gray ink known as “single needle” that he has popularized — and that a coterie of younger practitioners has propagated on increasingly dewier millennial dermis. Other clients include Adele, Angelina Jolie, Rihanna, Jared Leto and Lana Del Rey, who cast him as her muse in two music videos.

In the past, he offered his services to rivals 2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G. — the latter just days before he was killed. (Quincy Jones has joked that musicians thank “God and Mark Mahoney” at the Grammys; awards season in general is particularly busy for him, with extra house calls and visits to the Four Seasons hotel on Doheny Drive.) Longtime patron and friend Mickey Rourke stopped calling to get together after he couldn’t be squeezed in before a boxing match in Russia. “People have told me he’s gettin’ over it,” says Mahoney. “But it breaks my f—in’ heart.”

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on May 22, 2017 by Editor

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