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The New Twelve Apostles

from France 24

‘Twelve Apostles’ help migrants cross Mexico

© AFP | Undocumented migrants climb on a train known as “La Bestia” (The Beast), in the town of Las Patronas in Mexico’s Veracruz state hoping to reach the US

CÓRDOBA (MEXICO) (AFP) – It is pouring rain, but Norma Romero is standing by the train tracks as she does every night, ready to hand food to migrants crossing Mexico on the freight train known as “The Beast.”

In a few minutes, hundreds of undocumented migrants chasing the American dream will ride by atop the train as it passes through her village, Cordoba, crossing the eastern state of Veracruz on its way to the United States.

Romero is part of a group of 12 women who pass bottled water and bags of food up to the migrants to help them on their dangerous journey.

For years, she thought the men clinging to the cars were Mexicans train-hopping their way to another town instead of taking the bus.

Then one day “The Beast” ground to a halt in Cordoba, and the men jumped to the ground and begged her for help.

“They had Central American accents,” says Romero, 48.

“They were hungry. I had some bread and milk I’d just bought, and they asked me if they could have it.”

When she got home, she told her mother the story, and the two decided to cook the clandestine travelers a meal.

That was 23 years ago.

Every day since, Romero and a group of like-minded women dubbed “The 12 Apostles” have handed out food to the migrants to help them flee the poverty and gang violence ravaging their home countries.

[ click to continue reading at France 24 ]

Posted on August 19, 2018 by Editor

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Adored and Hunted – Aryana Sayeed

from Der Spiegel

‘I Am Very Aware of the Danger’

Aryana Sayeed, 33, is the only internationally known pop act in Afghanistan. She is adored by youth — and hunted by the Taliban.

By Susanne Koelbl

DER SPIEGEL: You’re beautiful, successful and independent — and, as a result, religious leaders would like to see you dead. How do you live with the fear?

Sayeed: During my time as a juror on the “Afghan Star” and “Voice of Afghanistan” talent shows, the death threats were the worst. Five mullahs issued a fatwa against me on TV, on a religious talk show, saying, “Whoever brings this woman’s head will ascend to heaven immediately.” While we were shooting, extremists killed eight colleagues in an attack on Tolo TV, which produces these programs. I’m still getting goose bumps.

DER SPIEGEL: Where does the hatred come from?

Sayeed: Radical mullahs say, “This woman comes from Europe and wants to put ideas into your women’s heads.” I teach women their right to be strong, to become independent, to stand up against injustice. But many men want to keep them as cleaners and baby machines, so they promise young men 72 virgins in paradise to blow themselves up to prevent the women from freeing themselves. It’s brainwashing.

DER SPIEGEL: Who wants 72 virgins?

Sayeed: The extremists play with the sexual frustration of young men. On the streets of Afghanistan, 99 percent of the passersby are men. When a woman in burka walks down the street, men stare at her bare hands and feet because the only women they usually deal with are their mothers and sisters. The young people are so hungry, so thirsty to catch even a glimpse of a woman.

DER SPIEGEL: Two years ago, tens of thousands of young men from Afghanistan came to Germany as refugees. How worried should parents be when their daughter becomes friends with a young Afghan?

Sayeed: The absolute majority of Afghans are innocent, decent people who would never harm anyone.

[ click to continue reading at Der Spiegel ]

Posted on August 18, 2018 by Editor

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Dastmalchian News

from Deadline

David Dastmalchian & Rhys Wakefield Join Hulu’s Femme Fatale Pilot ‘Reprisal’ From Warren Littlefield & A+E Studios

by Denise Petski

Photos courtesy of Persona PR/ICM Partners

David Dastmalchian (MacGyver, Twin Peaks) and Rhys Wakefield (True Detective, The Purge) are set as series regulars opposite Abigail Spencer and Mena Massoud in Hulu drama pilot Reprisal, from Warren Littlefield and A+E Studios.

Dastmalchian recently wrapped production on the upcoming film adaptation of James Frey’s A Million Little Pieces directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson, and Netflix’s Bird Box opposite Sandra Bullock and Sarah Paulson. He has also been cast for a key role in upcoming feature Die in a Gunfight, opposite Josh Hutcherson, Helen Hunt, Olivia Munn, and Kaya Scodelario, as well as psycho-thriller The Killing Kind,alongside Aaron Paul and Jane Lynch. His recent credits include Ant-Man and the Wasp, Blade Runner 2049 and recurring roles on MacGyver and Twin Peaks among others. Dastmalchian is represented by Hansen, Jacobson Teller Hoberman.

[ click to read full article at Deadline ]

Posted on August 17, 2018 by Editor

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Aretha Franklin Gone

from CNN

Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul, has died

By Lisa Respers France, Dan Gilgoff and Todd Leopold

Aretha Franklin, whose gospel-rooted singing and bluesy yet expansive delivery earned her the title “the Queen of Soul,” has died, a family statement said Thursday. She was 76.

Franklin died at 9:50 a.m. at her home in Detroit, surrounded by family and friends, according to a statement on behalf of Franklin’s family from her longtime publicist Gwendolyn Quinn.

Over the course of a professional career that spanned more than half a century, Franklin’s songs not only topped the charts but became part of the vernacular.

She made “Respect,” written by Otis Redding, a call to arms. “(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman,” a Carole King song, was an earthy expression of sexuality. “Think,” which she wrote with her then-husband, Ted White, became a rallying cry for women fed up with loutish men.

The first woman admitted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, she had 88 Billboard chart hits during the rock era, tops among female vocalists. At the peak of her career — from 1967 to 1975 — she had more than two dozen Top 40 hits.

[ click to read full article at CNN ]

Posted on August 16, 2018 by Editor

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James Frey Reads from KATERINA in New Canaan

from New Canaan’s Hamlet Hub

Authors @ New Canaan Library Presents James Frey, Introducing New Novel, Katerina

by Katherine Blance

New Canaan Library welcomes bestselling author James Frey, speaking about his latest novel, Katerina, on Wednesday, September 26 at 6:30 p.m. in the Adrian Lamb Room. Copies of the book will be available for purchase, courtesy of Elm Street Books. Please register online at newcanaanlibrary.org.

From the New York Times bestselling author of A Million Little Pieces and Bright Shiny Morning comes Katerina, James Frey’s highly anticipated new novel. Set in both 1992 Paris and contemporary Los Angeles, Katerina tells the story of a young writer and a young model on the verge of fame in 1992, both reckless, impulsive, and deeply in love. Twenty-five years later, the writer is rich and famous and numb – until he receives an anonymous message that draws him back to the life, and possibly to the love, he abandoned years prior.

James Frey is originally from Cleveland, Ohio. He is the bestselling author of A Million Little Pieces, My Friend Leonard, Bright Shiny Morning and The Final Testament of the Holy Bible. He is married and lives in Connecticut.

[ click to continue reading at Hamlet Hub ]

Posted on August 15, 2018 by Editor

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Affordable Big-Block Monsters

from Driving Line

BIG CAR, BIG BLOCK: 5 V8 MUSCLE MACHINES YOU CAN STILL AFFORD

by Benjamin Hunting

Mercury MarauderThe Mercury Marauder X-100

Looking for a V8 classic but feeling squeezed out by muscle car pricing? Don’t worry, there’s an entire subset of stealth big block cars out there that the collector market has largely ignored, keeping them affordable and relatively plentiful as compared to their more celebrated siblings.

Full-size sedans and coupes were often available with range-topping, large-displacement eight-cylinder engines in the 1960s and early ’70s, but given that the primary demographic for these models were families and business executives, they mostly flew under the radar with the hot rod crowd. It’s a trend that continues today, even with personal luxury coupes that throw in a bit of style to go with their torque-happy drivetrains.

For most builders, these enormous engines can be considered mere starting points for generating huge power after a few judicious modifications, but even in stock form they are a lot of fun. Just remember that we’re quoting gross horsepower ratings for each of these models, as they were all introduced before SAE net ratings were adopted.

Let’s take a look at five fun big block V8 classic cars that you can still afford.

[  click to continue reading at Driving Line ]

Posted on August 13, 2018 by Editor

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The de Kooning Behind The Door

from artnet

Was This Mild-Mannered Schoolteacher Couple Behind the Unsolved Heist of a $160 Million de Kooning Painting?

Does a book of short stories hold a clue as to how Jerry and Rita Alter acquired a stolen de Kooning?

The stolen De Kooning seen hanging behind Jerry and Rita Alter's bedroom door. Photo by Rick Johnson, courtesy of Manzanita Ridge Furniture & Antiques.The stolen De Kooning seen hanging behind Jerry and Rita Alter’s bedroom door. Photo by Rick Johnson, courtesy of Manzanita Ridge Furniture & Antiques.

Last year, the University of Arizona Museum of Art in Tucson was thrilled to announce the long-awaited return of Willem de Kooning’s Woman-Ochre (1954–55), which had been stolen from the museum in 1985. Now, new details have emerged about the elderly couple who kept the painting in their bedroom for decades, suggesting they may have carried out the daring heist.

No one who knew Jerry and Rita Alter, mild-mannered former school teachers, ever suspected they were hiding a stolen masterpiece in their Cliff, New Mexico, home, but that’s exactly where Woman-Ochre turned up, 32 years after a pair of thieves first made off with it. Jerry died in 2012, and Rita in 2017, and their estate was purchased by Manzanita Ridge Furniture & Antiques of Silver City, New Mexico, for about $2,000.

One piece, a midcentury painting hanging behind the bedroom door, caught the store owners’ eyes. The shop put the painting on view, where eagle-eyed visitors quickly pegged it for a real De Kooning. A quick internet search turned up the story of the university’s stolen painting, and the work was promptly returned by Good Samaritan co-owners David Van Auker, Buck Burns, and Rick Johnson. (The museum traveled to Silver City this past weekend to celebrate the one-year anniversary of the artwork’s recovery, with a party and panel discussion.) Currently, the museum is raising money to repair the work so it can be returned to view.

But a recently discovered image is fueling speculation that the couple was personally responsible for the robbery, which occurred the day after Thanksgiving. The Alter’s nephew and estate executor, Ron Roseman, has produced a photograph of the Alters taken in Tucson the day before the heist, seated at a holiday dinner table during dessert. AZ Central, which first published the image, points out that the snapshot bears a striking resemblance to a police sketch of the robbery suspects.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on August 12, 2018 by Editor

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Easton Ellis on Cultural Relevance

from Rolling Stone

Bret Easton Ellis on Podcasts, Politics and How His Dark Satire Predicted Trump’s America

“If there is a sense of cultural irrelevance hovering around me, that’s fine,” says the screenwriter and novelist behind ‘American Psycho,’ ‘Less Than Zero’

By

Over the past three decades, novelist Bret Easton Ellis has dealt in ultraviolence, casual nihilism and the skewering of America’s superficialities. With his last book, Imperial Bedrooms approaching its 10-year anniversary, it began to seem that Ellis was spinning his wheels. With several savagely reviewed screenwriting ventures in recent years — the 2013 Lindsay Lohan/James Deen erotic thriller The Canyons didn’t exactly set the world on fire — the Bret Easton Ellis brand might not hold as much commercial clout as it once did. However, in his 54th year, Ellis is happy. American Psycho has become a millennial touchstone and the pilot for Less Than Zero — a proposed 10-part miniseries for Hulu based on Ellis’s first book — just wrapped. With age came calm, but the man who birthed Patrick Bateman still has the ability to royally piss people off.

After decades of playing possum with his homosexuality in the media and on the page — in his 2005 semi-autobiographical novel Lunar Park, the main character is married with kids — Ellis has reached a place where his identity, politics and worldview are an open forum. The Bret Easton Ellis Podcast, which debuted in 2013 with guest Kanye West, has been a soapbox for the Literary Brat-Packer to rant about whatever is on his mind, from film and music, to pop culture and politics. This year, Ellis took the podcast to Patreon, a subscription service that charges Ellis fans $1.50 per episode, or $10 a month for a membership where users can participate in Q&As with Ellis and his guests. In a time where paid podcasts are mostly viewed as a fool’s venture, Ellis sees it as an experiment in action — albeit one that might not be working out as great as he envisioned.

Catching up with Ellis from his Beverly Hills home, we discussed fear, liberal loathing and why he’s not afraid to be culturally irrelevant.

[ click to continue reading at Rolling Stone ]

Posted on August 11, 2018 by Editor

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Anne Frank Meets The Underground Railroad

Posted on August 9, 2018 by Editor

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World Dog-surfing Championships

Posted on August 7, 2018 by Editor

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Rubochon Gone

from AFP via Yahoo! News

World’s most-starred chef Joel Robuchon dead at 73

Robuchon, who was hailed as one of four "chefs of the century" by the Gault Millau industry bible in 1990, founded a string of restaurants that revolutionised fine dining across three continents, ratcheting up a whopping 31 Michelin stars

Paris (AFP) – Joel Robuchon, the world’s most-starred Michelin chef who tore down kitchen walls to give diners new insights into the art of haute cuisine, has died at 73, a French government spokesman said Monday.

Robuchon, who was hailed as one of four “chefs of the century” by the Gault Millau industry bible in 1990, founded a string of restaurants that revolutionised fine dining across three continents, ratcheting up a whopping 31 Michelin stars.

From Tokyo to Paris and Macao, foodies queue up for seats in his L’Atelier restaurants, where they can watch chefs in action, perched on high stools at a U-shaped bar.

“Joel Robuchon, a visionary chef who was the most starred in the world, leaves us today.

[ click to continue reading at Yahoo! News ]

Posted on August 6, 2018 by Editor

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Blood, Edge and Danger

from The Mirror

Inside world of bare-knuckle boxing where fights are full of blood, edge and danger and the injuries are very real

Know as Ultimate Bare Knuckle Boxing (UBKB) it’s run by Netflix star Shaun Smith who admits ‘because there are no gloves, the punches have far more impact’

By Tom Duffy & Andrew Gilpin

The vicious fight between Atkin and Clark (Image: Getty Images Europe)

Bare-knuckle boxers sit battered and bruised, their faces cut and bleeding, the bandages on their hands covered in blood.

These are men like Jay ‘BamBam’ Eggleston, 35 from Sheffield and Paul Stredder, 35 from the Wirral, who had to be checked over by a medical team during their brutal bouts last night.

As these shocking pictures reveal, all the matches were brutal, bloody affairs.

Bare-knuckle boxing now looks set to shed its underground image and become more mainstream as the sports moves from pubs and car parks to bigger, more established venues.

Last night at the Bowlers Exhibition centre in Stretford, Manchester, the main event saw two-time World Bare-Knuckle Boxing Champion Luke Atkin, 30, from York, take on Dom Clark, 35, from Bournemouth during the Rogue Elite world title bout.

It was a bout Clark won in a ferocious match up.

Know as Ultimate Bare Knuckle Boxing (UBKB) and run by promoter Shaun Smith, the sport sees men of all ages battle out one of the rawest forms of legalised sport.

The first formal bare-knuckle boxing bout in Britain was recorded in 1681 with the sport popularised by the end of the 17th century.

The introduction of gloves into boxing with the Queensberry rules in 1867 eventually pushed bare-knuckle underground.

[ click to continue reading at The Mirror ]

Posted on August 5, 2018 by Editor

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Long Tail Boat Racing

Posted on August 2, 2018 by Editor

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Shadowy Racing

from The Drive

Behind the Shadowy Billion-Dollar Payouts of F1, NASCAR, and IndyCar

We take an in-depth look at who makes the money—and how much—in the world’s top-tier racing series.

BY JERRY PEREZ

GETTY / Scott Dixon is rumored to be the highest-paid IndyCar driver, earning around $2-3 million per year.

If you want to make a small fortune in auto racing, start with a huge fortune. That old saying is more relevant than ever. The finances behind high-stakes, competitive motorsports are ruthless—even more so than in any other mainstream sport.

The variables behind how teams, drivers, and sanctioning bodies like IndyCar, NASCAR, and F1 make their money aren’t only wildly complex, but they can also change frequently, depending on evolving business needs, market conditions, and any number of other factors. Plus, the principals are deeply secretive, with most members of the racing fraternity unwilling to discuss contracts, salaries, or sponsorship deals.

Racing is a performance business. Only the best, the fastest, and the smartest can survive for long. The historical, decades-long losses sustained by, say, the Cleveland Browns, would never fly in motorsports. Whether open-wheel or stock cars, the basic rules of capitalism are applied with neither mercy nor sentiment: a team with top-10 overhead can’t finish outside the top 10 and expect prime sponsors and drivers to stick around. The flashy decals will stop arriving and the talent will jump ship. And once that happens, it’s game over.

[ click to continue reading at The Drive ]

Posted on August 1, 2018 by Editor

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QUEEN AND SLIM – Lena Waithe Mashes It Up With James Frey

from INQUISITR

Lena Waithe Tabs Daniel Kaluuya To Star In New Movie, ‘Queen & Slim’

by

Get Out and Black Panther actor Daniel Kaluuya has been tabbed to take the lead role of Slim, in an upcoming film, Queen & Slim, a romance drama written by Emmy award-winning writer Lena Waithe.

According to the Hollywood Reporter, the script is being described as the black version of Bonnie and Clyde’s love story. The film will focus on a black couple out and about enjoying their first date together when things take a turn for the worse. The couple ends up killing a police officer in self-defense and have no other option but to head to Cuba.

“Queen & Slim is an exploration of America’s social and political climate through the lens of a genre-defying love story,” according to Variety.

The movie is said to be based on an idea and treatment from best-selling author James Frey (A Million Little Pieces) and story created by Waithe and Frey. Melina Matsoukas is also set to join the star-studded team as director, making this her directorial debut for a featured film. Matsoukas is known for her work on HBO’s Insecure and has directed a number of music videos, including Beyonce’s “Formation.”

[ click to continue reading at INQUISITR ]

Posted on July 31, 2018 by Editor

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Happy Half-century to The Big Mac

from AP

50 years on, McDonald’s and fast-food evolve around Big Mac

By CANDICE CHOI

As with many of its popular and long-lasting menu items, the idea for the Big Mac came from a franchisee.

In 1967, Michael James “Jim” Delligatti lobbied the company to let him test the burger at his Pittsburgh restaurants. Later, he acknowledged the Big Mac’s similarity to a popular sandwich sold by the Big Boy chain.

“This wasn’t like discovering the light bulb. The bulb was already there. All I did was screw it in the socket,” Delligatti said, according to “Behind the Arches.”

McDonald’s agreed to let Delligatti sell the sandwich at a single location, on the condition that he use the company’s standard bun. It didn’t work. Delligatti tried a bigger sesame seed bun, and the burger soon lifted sales by more than 12 percent.

After similar results at more stores, the Big Mac was added to the national menu in 1968. Other ideas from franchisees that hit the big time include the Filet-O-Fish, Egg McMuffin, Apple Pie (once deep-fried but now baked), and the Shamrock Shake.

“The company has benefited from the ingenuity of its small business men,” wrote Ray Kroc, who transformed the McDonald’s into a global franchise, in his book, “Grinding It Out.”

[ click to read full article at AP ]

Posted on July 30, 2018 by Editor

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Art of the Car

from artnet

Putting Art in the Back Seat, Kenny Schachter Goes to Venerate the Old Masters of the Racetrack at the Festival of Speed

With a lull in the art calendar, our columnist went off to pursue his second all-consuming passion—classic cars—at a tony British hillclimb.

Seventeen-time Le Mans entrant, and driver of my car, Nic Minassian. Photo courtesy of Kenny Schachter.

As an isolated, overweight child growing up in Long Island with zero exposure to culture, cars were my gateway drug to art. It was the industrial design that initially drew me in, and now I when I sit down to write I have a car directly under my desk, in my office that was once a garage and which I have since converted into a hybrid office-cum-carpark. The reasoning: when you drive a vehicle you don’t see it, and when you park, you leave it. I am drawn to the lines, smells, and furniture (aka car seats), all of it. I love to look at cars, except when I write about art—then I black out, see nothing but the page, and listen to the same song 200 times in a row. (The Strokes recently, ugh.)

Goodwood House, in Chichester, West Sussex, was built in 1600 and acquired by the Duke of Richmond in 1697; the 12,000-acre estate features car and horse racetracks, an airport, two golf courses, a hotel, and an organic farm. (I wandered into a pig patch and got challenged by a 300-pound beast.) The headquarters of Rolls Royce are also situated on the premises. There are George Stubbs hunting scenes, a Caneletto London-scape, Van Dycks, and a Veronese on the walls, lest I forget. The present Duke, Charles Richmond, established the Festival of Speed (FOS) 25 years ago, a hillclimbing event where competitors race against the clock on a vertiginous course—in this case, the service road in front of the Duke’s pile (UK slang for a rather large abode). Five years later he launched the Revival, where visitors dress in period attire to embrace the early days of motorsport.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on July 29, 2018 by Editor

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Save The Clark Bar!

from CNN

NECCO, the oldest American candy company, suddenly shuts its factory

by Talib Visram

The future of Sky Bars and Sweethearts is in limbo after the NECCO factory closed this week.

The NECCO plant in Revere, Massachusetts, was shut suddenly Tuesday by its owner, Round Hill Investments LLC, The investment company, owned by billionaire C. Dean Metropolous, bought NECCO out of bankruptcy in May for $17.3 million.

The news was first reported by The Boston Globe.

“We are disappointed that Round Hill could not follow through on the enthusiasm it expressed when it acquired Necco barely two months ago,” said Revere Mayor Brian Arrigo in a statement.

Arrigo said he was disappointed that the city received no advance word about the plant’s closing, but he was encouraged that six private food service companies have already expressed interest in interviewing the former NECCO factory workers.

[ click to continue reading at CNN ]

Posted on July 26, 2018 by Editor

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Everything We Think We Know Is Wrong

from NPR

14,000-Year-Old Piece Of Bread Rewrites The History Of Baking And Farming

by LINA ZELDOVICH

When an archaeologist working on an excavation site in Jordan first swept up the tiny black particles scattered around an ancient fireplace, she had no idea they were going to change the history of food and agriculture.

Amaia Arranz-Otaegui is an archaeobotanist from the University of Copenhagen. She was collecting dinner leftovers of the Natufians, a hunter-gatherer tribe that lived in the area more than 14,000 years ago during the Epipaleolithic time — a period between the Paleolithic and Neolithic eras.

Natufians were hunters, which one could clearly tell from the bones of gazelles, sheep and hares that littered the cooking pit. But it turns out the Natufians were bakers, too –at a time well before scientists thought it was possible.

[ click to continue reading at NPR ]

Posted on July 24, 2018 by Editor

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James Frey to CAA – A MILLION LITTLE PIECES to Festivals

from Deadline

CAA Signs James Frey As Sam & Aaron Taylor-Johnson Ready ‘A Million Little Pieces’ Film For Fall Festivals

by Mike Fleming Jr

James FreyREX/Shutterstock

EXCLUSIVE: CAA just signed best-selling author James Frey. This comes as Brad Weston’s Makeready and The Picture Company prepare to launch A Million Little Pieces, the screen version of the semi-autobiographical and controversial addiction novel that was adapted into a feature by Aaron Taylor-Johnson and Sam Taylor-Johnson, the latter of whom directed her husband in the lead role. The film, which also stars Billy Bob Thornton, Giovanni Ribisi and Odessa Young (Assassination Nation), will be launched as an acquisition title in the fall festivals.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline ]

 

Posted on July 23, 2018 by Editor

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Go Ask Alice

from LEMONWIRE

“Go Ask Alice” (1973) offers an anti-drug message with a side of rock ‘n’ roll

By Dodie Miller-Gould

Now streaming on YouTube is a 1973 movie based on the once- alleged true story of a young drug addict named Alice. The movie is based on the book of the same name that was published in 1971. While the book’s origin was once steeped in controversy, it is mostly forgotten now.

“Go Ask Alice” the movie is significant to fans of rock music and history by the way it contextualizes rock music of the late 1960s and attempts to show the means by which even a girl from a good family can fall into the trap of drugs and their attendant misadventures.

“Go Ask Alice” 45 years later

Watching the film version of the book is as close to watching a time capsule as some people will get. There is a bit of editorializing as the opening credits appear and what sounds like a cover version of Jefferson Airplane’s “White Rabbit” plays. Viewers are shown “examples” of kids of the time period. Kids with glasses, boys with long hair; moody-looking girls with very long hair; there were even two black students. The song “White Rabbit” contains the line from which the title “Go Ask Alice” derives.  The fashions and the moods clue viewers in on what life was probably like 50 years ago. The movie is interesting on that basis alone.

“Go Ask Alice” and controversy

Years before James Frey and the “Million Little Pieces” scandal, there was “Go Ask Alice” and the theories about who wrote the book. The author is listed as “Anonymous.” The book was purported to be the real journal of a 15-year-old girl who was the Alice of the title.

Once thought to be nonfiction, “Go Ask Alice” is categorized as fiction now. The controversy about the book’s authorship has done nothing to negatively impact the book’s popularity. However, the American Library Association challenges the book’s suitability for young audiences because of its language and depictions of sex and drug use.

[ click to continue reading at LEMONWIRE ]

Posted on July 22, 2018 by Editor

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Giant Jeff Goldblum

from VICE

Finally, the World Has a Giant, Shirtless Jeff Goldblum Statue

Behold, one of the greatest artistic achievements of our time.

Photo via NowTV / Fever PR

Jeff Goldblum is iconic in everything he touches, but there is no role quite so canon as his turn as Dr. Ian Malcolm in Jurassic Park, and no scene that captures his essence quite as well as that brief, beautiful moment where he’s sweaty as all hell and shirtless for some reason.

It’s been 25 years since that cinematic touchstone graced this world, and to commemorate it, London’s NOW TV has constructed one of the greatest artistic achievements of our time: A 25-foot statue of a half-naked Jeff Goldblum.

It was an audacious move on the artist’s part to even try to recreate such an impeccable expression of the human form, but the risk paid off. No detail was spared: The stubble is perfectly rendered, so subtle you’d miss it if you didn’t take a closer look. His hand hangs loose from the wrist in that quintessentially Goldblum-ian attitude of effortlessness, of ease with the self. And those eyes: They gleam with a confluence of fear and knowledge—a mirror image of the look Goldblum flashed the camera just after Dr. Malcolm nearly lost his life to a T. Rex.

[ click to continue reading at VICE ]

Posted on July 18, 2018 by Editor

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Seventy Years of Hells Angels

from RealClearLife

Hells Angels at 70: Rebels With a Cause

The infamous motorcycle gang now does brisk business selling branded merchandise and politicking.

By Kevin B. Sullivan

Motorcycles are parked on the street outside the Hells Angels motorcycle club headquarters in New York. (AP Photo/Tom Hays, File)

In the early hours of December 11, 2016, while cruising New York City’s East Village neighborhood, 25-year-old David Martinez and his friends encountered a problem. Driving down E. 3rd Street, the group suddenly found themselves stuck behind a livery cab. Noticing an orange parking cone obstructing their way around the cab, Martinez hopped out of the passenger side door of his black Mercedes-Benz in order to move the cone and squeeze by the livery cab.

Unfortunately for Martinez and his companions, that cone had been deliberately placed there by the notorious Hells Angels Motorcycle Club, who have long called that stretch of 3rd Street between First and Second avenues home. The club’s illegal practice of saving spaces for motorcycles in front of their East Village clubhouse was common knowledge for those in the local know, but one with potentially deadly consequences for the uninitiated.

A melee ensued over the cone, as Martinez and his friends clashed with a handful of Hells Angels members. It was then that Anthony Iovenitti – a security guard and reported “prospect” with the club – pulled a firearm and shot Martinez in the stomach.

[ click to continue reading at RCL ]

Posted on July 17, 2018 by Editor

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Lost Kubrick Script Found

from The Guardian

Lost Stanley Kubrick screenplay, Burning Secret, is found 60 years on

Script co-written by director is so close to completion it could be developed into a feature film

Stanley Kubrick on the set of Barry Lyndon in 1975The legendary American director Stanley Kubrick on the set of Barry Lyndon in 1975. Photograph: Corbis via Getty Images

His first world war classic, Paths of Glory, is one of cinema’s most powerful anti-war movies, widely acclaimed as a masterpiece, as was his Roman epic, Spartacus, both of which starred Kirk Douglas. Now a “lost” screenplay by director Stanley Kubrick has been discovered – and it is so close to completion that it could be developed by film-makers.

Entitled Burning Secret, the script is an adaptation of the 1913 novella by the Viennese writer Stefan Zweig. In Kubrick’s adaptation of the story of adultery and passion set in a spa resort, a suave and predatory man befriends a 10-year-old boy, using him to seduce the child’s married mother.

He wrote it in 1956 with the novelist Calder Willingham, with whom he went on to collaborate on Paths of Glory the following year.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on July 15, 2018 by Editor

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KISS Bag

Posted on July 14, 2018 by Editor

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Resale Royalties

from The Observer

Should Artists Get Royalties if Their Work Is Resold? Europe Says Yes, US Says No

Frank Stella’s Delaware Crossing (estimated at $8 to 12 million) and Picasso’s Femme assise sur une chaise(estimated at $25 to 35 million) from the collection of A. Alfred Taubman being sold at Sotheby’s in 2015. Tristan Fewings/Getty Images for Sotheby’s

Artist resale royalties in the United States, like Old Marley in the Dickens story, are as dead as a door-nail. On Friday, July 6, an appellate court in California ruled that the state’s 1977 Resale Royalties Act, which grants artists an unwaivable right to five percent of the proceeds on any resale of their artwork under specified circumstances, is incompatible with federal Copyright law and deserved to be struck down.

California was the only state to adopt such a law in the U.S. But all have somehow been thwarted. A similar effort in New York State did not get as far as a vote, and federal legislation—the A.R.T. [American Royalties Too] Act—introduced in 2014 into the House of Representatives by Democratic Congressman Jerrold Nadler, and in the Senate by Tammy Baldwin (D-WI) and Ed Markey (D-MA) also has not advanced. “It isn’t a matter that artist resale royalties are incompatible with the U.S. constitution,” said Boston-based art lawyer Nicholas O’Donnell. “It’s just incompatible politically, as there really isn’t any interest in this concept on the part of any party.” Again, dead as a door-nail.

Let’s run an obituary.

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Posted on July 13, 2018 by Editor

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Mont Blanc Tunnel Cool

from WIRED

JULY 16, 1965: MONT BLANC TUNNEL OPENS

by Keith Barry

1965: After 19 years of planning and construction, the Mont Blanc Tunnel officially opens. The new tunnel stretches 7 miles, linking the French town of Chamonix and the Italian town of Courmayeur. Buried 1.5 miles under the Alps’ highest peak, it becomes the world’s deepest road tunnel beneath rock and gains infamy after a deadly 1999 fire.

Until the opening of the tunnel, road traffic in the Alps between France and Italy wended its way over hairpin turns and sharp grades, with mountain passes closed the majority of the year because of snow. Italian construction teams began drilling a tunnel into Mont Blanc (or Monte Bianco on their side) to build a year-round route in 1946. The next year, France and Italy signed an agreement to build the tunnel together.

Construction, however, did not begin in earnest until May 30, 1959, with the help of an 82-ton tunnel-boring machine. Tunneling began at 4,091 feet on the French side and at 4,530 feet on the Italian side.

It took 783 tons of explosives to complete the drilling. The French and Italian teams met Aug. 4, 1962, with a discrepancy of only 5.12 inches between the two sides.

[ click to continue reading at WIRED ]

Posted on July 7, 2018 by Editor

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California Missions

from The LA Times

A history of California’s missions

Spanish explorer Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo sails into San Pedro Bay and claims the California coast for the king of Spain.

Spanish Catholic missionaries from the Jesuit order begin colonizing Baja California, beginning with Loreto. Sixteen more missions will follow in the next 70 years.

About 300,000 Indians live in Alta California, organized into about 80 autonomous groups, sustaining themselves mostly through hunting, gathering and fishing.

Spain expels the Jesuits from Baja California and gives control to another Catholic order, the Franciscans.

Spanish soldiers and Franciscan friars, led by 55-year-old Father Junípero Serra, found the first Alta California mission in San Diego. Spain’s king is eager to strengthen his hold on the region before Russian fur-traders can move south from Alaska. Once baptized, Indian converts (known as “neophytes”) are typically forced to remain and are taught farming, weaving, carpentry and leather-working.

As the missionaries advance up the coast, European diseases spread among Indians, killing thousands. A native group attacks the Mission San Diego, killing Father Luís Jayme.

Serra dies at age 70 in Carmel, having established nine missions. Father Fermín Lasuén takes over the chain. Friars and soldiers expand the network of farms and ranches, using Indian converts as captive laborers.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on June 12, 2018 by Editor

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Racy KATERINA Billboard Rejected by Javitz Center

from The San Francisco Chronicle

Publishers embrace, and ponder, audiobooks’ rise

NEW YORK (AP) — As the audiobook market continues to boom, publishers find themselves both grateful and concerned.

The industry gathered over the past week for BookExpo and the fan-based BookCon, which ended Sunday at the Jacob Javits center in Manhattan. The consensus, as it has been for the past few years, is of a stable overall market: physical books rising, e-book sales soft and audio, led by downloaded works, expanding by double digits.

…Conventiongoers lined up to meet Sally Field, Tony Kushner and Charlaine Harris, among others. They also stood (and sat) patiently for the once-notorious James Frey, whose “Katerina” will be publushed this fall by Gallery Books, a Simon & Schuster imprint.

A decade ago, Frey’s addiction memoir “A Million Little Pieces” was revealed as being extensively fabricated and the author himself was chewed out on television by Oprah Winfrey, but not before her initial endorsement had helped the book sell millions. But Winfrey and Frey later reconciled, Frey now openly writes fiction and Gallery is openly promoting his old work, whether billing “Katerina” as “Written in the same percussive, propulsive, dazzling, breathtaking style as ‘A Million Little Pieces'” or highlighting the memoir in a billboard ad for his new novel.

“‘A Million Little Pieces’ is a beloved and brilliant book, regardless of the controversy, so we did not think twice about using it in our advertising,” Gallery spokeswoman Jennifer Robinson said.

But one change was made for the convention.

“The Javits Center did reject our first design for the billboard as it showed a bit too much flesh,” Robinson said. “We had to make a little less of ‘Katerina’ visible.”

[ click to continue reading at the Chronicle ]

Posted on June 11, 2018 by Editor

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Won’t You Be My Neighbor

from The Village Voice

“Won’t You Be My Neighbor?” and Mister Rogers Insist Humanity Can Be Better Than This

by LARA ZARUM

If your cold, cold heart doesn’t melt at some point during Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, the documentary about Fred “Mister” Rogers, well, I don’t know what to do for you. Watching this movie is like freebasing sincerity — a scarce resource in our current entertainment hellscape. It’ll give you warm fuzzies for days.

Won’t You Be My Neighbor? takes us back to an honest-to-God simpler time, when the idea of a minister with an “abiding interest in children,” as one newscaster describes Rogers in the doc, didn’t immediately raise eyebrows. Early in the film, the late Rogers — whose legendary children’s show, Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood, aired for more than thirty years starting in 1968 — expresses his desire to help children make sense of the world “through the mass media.” He made this comment back when television was still a fairly newfangled technology, and when a few well-intentioned folks like Mister Rogers thought to use “mass media” to spread wholesome education rather than dogged consumerism.

Through archival footage of Rogers both on and off the set of his iconic show, as well as interviews with his family, friends, and former crew members, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? draws a flattering yet complex portrait of its subject, who died of cancer in 2003. What is most remarkable is Rogers’s grasp, even in the medium’s nascent years, of how television can shape young minds. “What we see and hear on the screen is part of who we become,” he insisted. Rogers understood, earlier than most, that television — that oh-so-intimate medium that catches us at home, unguarded, the screen perhaps just inches away from our faces — profoundly alters the way we see one another and ourselves. “Television,” young Rogers argued, “has the chance of building a real community out of an entire country.”

[ click to continue reading at The Village Voice ]

Posted on June 10, 2018 by Editor

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The Water Wars

from the LA Times via Bristol Herald Courier

One of LA’s oldest community gardens thrived for decades. Then the water wars began

For more than 40 years, Italian, Mexican, Croatian, Filipino, Indonesian and Laotian gardeners have built productive mini-farms on the parcels. Jason Neubert / Los Angeles Times

LOS ANGELES — The old Italian men pass their mornings near the top of the hill, tending thick grape vines and rows of fava beans, smoking crumbling Toscano cigars, staying out of the house. If you try to call Francesco “Frank” Mitrano at home, his wife will brusquely tell you that he’s at “the farm.”

The farm is a patch of soil by the 110 Freeway, where he harvests enough tomatoes from his crop to make spaghetti sauce for his family’s weekly Sunday dinner. “Twenty-one people,” he exclaims.

A half-century ago, Filipino seafarers re-created a piece of the old country on this weedy hillside in San Pedro.

Italian fishermen quickly joined them, as did others with horticultural skills honed all over the world — Mexico, Laos, India, Japan, Indonesia, Croatia, Hawaii, Louisiana, Arizona and Lawndale.

More than 250 parcels are connected by a maze of trails and pipes and hoses. Avocado trees soar as high as 60 feet. Giant banana leaves, ratoons of sugar cane and bright orange guavas — set amid a jumble of sheds, trellises, fences and retaining walls — give the hill the look of a rural village carved from jungle.

The community garden — thought to be the oldest in Los Angeles — grew quietly and off the grid, with unlimited water and little oversight.

But now, in a time of drought, it faces an existential crisis after the city drastically cut its water supply.

Though the heavy rains helped last year, the plots they have nurtured for decades are getting thirstier every day.

Mitrano, 83, barrel-chested with a burl of a nose and a sail rigger’s forearms, sneered at the hose that dribbled at his feet.

“No hay presion,” said Mitrano, using Spanish, the lingua franca of the garden. There is no water pressure.

[ click to continue reading at Bristol Herald Courier ]

Posted on June 9, 2018 by Editor

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Andrew Solomon On Suicide

from The New Yorker

Preventable Tragedies

By Andrew Solomon

Anthony Bourdain was almost inconceivably high-functioning; the gap between public triumph and private despair is treacherous. Photograph by Mike Coppola / Getty

The pattern of highly accomplished and successful people committing suicide is transfixing. It assures the rest of us that a life of accolades is not all that it’s cracked up to be and that achieving more will not make us happier. At the same time, it reveals the fact that no one is safe from suicide, that whatever defenses we think we have are likely to be inadequate. Kate Spade’s handbags were playful and fun. Her quirky look was unmistakable and bespoke exuberance. Anthony Bourdain was almost inconceivably high-functioning, and won so many awards that he seemed ready to give an award to his favorite award. High-profile suicides such as these cause copycat suicides; there was a nearly ten-per-cent spike in suicides following Robin Williams’s death. There is always an upswing following such high-profile events. You who are reading this are at statistically increased risk of suicide right now. Who knows if Bourdain had read of Kate Spade’s suicide as he prepared to do the same thing? We are all statistically more likely to kill ourselves than we were ten years ago. That increased vulnerability is itself depressing, and that depressing information interacts with our own unguarded selves. If life wasn’t worth living for people such as Bourdain and Spade, how can our more ordinary lives hold up? Those of us who have clinical depression can feel the tug toward suicide amped up by this kind of news. The gap between public triumph and private despair is treacherous, with the outer shell obscuring the real person even to those with whom he or she had professed intimacy.

There has long been an assertion popular in mental-health circles that suicide is a symptom of depression and that, if we would only treat depression adequately, suicide would be a thing largely of the past. We learn of Kate Spade’s possible marital woes as though marital woes rationalized a suicide. It is true that, in someone with a significant tendency to suicide, external factors may trigger the act itself, but difficult circumstances do not usually fully explain someone’s choice to terminate his or her own life. People must have an intrinsic vulnerability; for every person who kills himself when he is left by his wife, there are hundreds who don’t kill themselves under like circumstances.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on June 8, 2018 by Editor

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Karma

from Real Clear Life

Plot Twist: The Strange Story of Douglas Parkhurst

He became a hero in the last moment of his life—but did he redeem himself?

By Steve Huff

It was the first day of June, the unofficial beginning of summer, and a maroon car was careening across a Little League baseball field in Sanford, Maine’s Goodall Park. Players rushed to get out of the way as the driver—police later identified her as 52-year-old Carol Sharrow— barely missed them, curving toward home base then away again. She was looking for an exit and spotted a gate. More kids were in danger on the other side.

A witness named Justin Clifton later told a Maine news station what happened next. He said he “saw the car pull out of the […] and this guy had some kids with him.”

Clifton said that when the car “came to the gate, the older guy pushed the kids right out of the way. He took the hit for the kids.”

So, Douglas Parkhurst, age 68, died taking that “hit for the kids.” The Vietnam vet was the hero of the moment and a tragic one at that. A man who in photos appeared ruddy, fit for his age, with a winning smile. It was a moving, powerful story.

For the second time in five years, Douglas Parkhurst’s name was in the news along with the phrase “hit-and-run driver.”

The first time was a very different story.

[ click to continue reading at RCL ]

Posted on June 6, 2018 by Editor

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