Planetary Defence System To Be Tested

from The Daily Mail

30-metre asteroid skimming past Earth in October will test Nasa’s doomsday ‘planetary defence system’

On October 12, the 2012 TC4 asteroid will be just 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometres) from Earth for the first time since it went out of range in 2012. Nasa is using the opportunity to test its 'planetary defence system'On October 12, the 2012 TC4 asteroid will be just 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometres) from Earth for the first time since it went out of range in 2012. Nasa is using the opportunity to test its ‘planetary defence system’

On October 12, a 30-metre is set to make a ‘close’ flyby of Earth.

The asteroid, named 2012 TC4, will pass just 4,200 miles (6,800 kilometres) from Earth for the first time since it went out of range in 2012.

Nasa is using this opportunity to test it’s ‘planetary defence system’ put in place to protect Earth from a doomsday asteroid threat.

Asteroid 2012 TC4 is estimated to be between 10 and 30 metres in size.

Michael Kelley, a scientist working on the Nasa TC4 observation campaign, said: ‘Scientists have always appreciated knowing when an asteroid will make a close approach to and safely pass the Earth because they can make preparations to collect data to characterise and learn as much as possible about it.

‘This time we are adding in another layer of effort, using this asteroid flyby to test the worldwide asteroid detection and tracking network, assessing our capability to work together in response to finding a potential real asteroid threat.’

[ click to continue reading at The Daily Mail ]

Eyeballs In My Anus

from Crazed.com

WYOMING MAN FOUND WITH 30 EYEBALLS IN HIS ANAL CAVITY

CASPER, Wyo. –

tilbott

Police made a routine traffic stop early Thursday morning and got more than they bargained for when Roy Tilbott, 51, stepped out of his El Camino for a field sobriety test and Casper police noticed several eyeballs slide from his right pant leg onto the road.

Feeling they could have a potential murderer on their hands, police quickly drew guns and cuffed Tilbott.

Tilbott assured police the eyeballs were not human, but instead cow eyeballs he had pilfered from Johnson Meats (a slaughterhouse) where Tilbott is employed as a butcher.

“Company won’t let us take animal scraps home and instead toss them in the landfill,” Tilbott said in the police report. “They’re a very wasteful company. We should be allowed to take scrap meat and other parts home. The company should start a green initiative. They don’t even have recycling at the plant.”

Tilbott explained his actions:  “I enjoy eating bovine eyeballs and smuggling them out in my colon was the only way I knew how to get them out without potentially getting caught and fired.”

Tilbott told police he estimates he has smuggled several thousand eyeballs from the plant over the past few months.

“I put them in soups,” Tilbott said in the police report. “They’re beneficial for erectile dysfunction, which I currently battle, but I also just like the texture and taste.”

[ click to read complete article at crazed.com ]

Sky Sex

from LifeBuzz

Couple Had Sex While Skydiving, And Gravity REALLY Helped.

By Camila Villafañe

Take a good look at this woman's face. That's the look of sheer and utter sexual gratification.CNN

Your significant other is always claiming the sex has become a little stale. So the typical solution seems to be to start trying all kinds of new positions, some of which are neck-breaking. But we follow the Kama Sutra because when it comes to sex, it’s sacred. But this unlikely couple decided to try something that was beyond wild. They decided to do it from thousands of feet in the air. Yeah! That’s right! We’re talking about having sex while skydiving. Not only were these two fearless, but they also made history in the process.

Take a good look at this woman’s face. That’s the look of sheer and utter sexual gratification.

Most women can only hope to achieve this level of orgasm and most men only dream of making it happen. Of course you’d have to be hurtling through the air at insane speeds, and if that parachute doesn’t open, that big O could be your last.

[ click to continue reading at LifeBuzz ]

Russo Bros.

from DEADLINE

Fox Sets Russo Brothers In Co-Finance & WW Distribution Deal For New Movie Projects

by Mike Fleming Jr

Jonathan Hordle/REX/Shutterstock

EXCLUSIVE: Avengers: Infinity War directors Joe and Anthony Russo are zeroing in on a major deal with 20th Century Fox for their unnamed production company that will fully launch in January after they complete back-to-back Avengers sequels. Sources said the Russo Brothers are closing a long term non-exclusive pact for Fox to co-finance and distribute worldwide features generated by the new venture. The company will have put pictures included, and the venture will provide the other half of the financing for its films. I understand there was competition among studios to land the deal.

The Russo Brothers had a comfort level with and respect for Fox film chief Stacey Snider that goes back to her days at Universal. Snider was the entry point, and they met and hit it off with production chief Emma Watts, sources said. The duo has been working on the launch of this venture for over a year, with an eye toward directing films and producing others, and creating a feeder system for emerging talent. The Fox deal will allow them to start as a funded mini-major.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Back-Room Apollo 13

from WIRED

THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE BACK-ROOM TEAM THAT SAVED APOLLO 13

by 

IF EVERYTHING GOES smoothly, nobody remembers your work.

But on April 13, 1970, an oxygen tank explosion aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft set a harrowing mission into motion—and its success would turn a team of heartland boys into national heroes. A little more than two days into the mission’s voyage to the moon, the command module began to lose its supply of electricity and water. That’s when astronaut John Swigert uttered the phrase that would implant mission control in the public’s consciousness: “Houston, we’ve had a problem here.”

Houston—those working behind the scenes at NASA—is the focus of a new documentary that explores the history of the Apollo space program.

“Most of the attention around Apollo has focused on the astronauts,” says Keith Haviland, a producer of Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo, released last week. “But the film is about those people in the back room at NASA who really made the missions happen through planning, through monitoring the flights, through dealing with emergencies.”

[ click to continue reading at WIRED ]

Alice Cooper’s Electric Chair

from artnet

Alice Cooper Just Realized He Got a Warhol Electric Chair 40 Years Ago and Totally Forgot About It

The discovery could be the first major market test of a new Warhol authentication service.

by Eileen Kinsella

Andy Warhol with Alice Cooper in 1974. Photo by Bob Gruen. Courtesy Bob Gruen.Andy Warhol with Alice Cooper in 1974. Photo by Bob Gruen. Courtesy Bob Gruen.

How rock n’ roll is Alice Cooper? He is so rock n’ roll that he actually forgot about a canvas believed to be by Andy Warhol that he received as a gift in the 1970s and later put into storage.

Soon, that painting will see the light of day again—first in Cooper’s home, and then potentially on the market—thanks to advice from a Los Angeles collector and a San Francisco private dealer.

Back in the early 1970s, when Cooper was touring the world, he typically included an unusual theatrical element in his macabre shock rock act: an actual electric chair. Aware of his fondness for the sinister stage prop, Cooper’s then-girlfriend, Cindy Lang (a model who had appeared on the cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine), bought him an Andy Warhol red electric chair silkscreen in 1974. She paid $2,500 for it.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Moon Battle

from Bloomberg

The Battle for the Moon Begins

An increasing number of nations and companies are headed there. One group says the UN needs to start making more rules before it’s too late.

By Justin Bachman

A laser reflector was left on the moon for scientists to use as a measuring device. Photographer: NASA/Roger Ressmeyer/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

On the 48th anniversary of Neil Armstrong setting foot on the moon, an Illinois attorney hopes to pocket as much as $4 million at a Sotheby’s auction of a bag that Apollo 11 astronauts filled with rocks.

The bag’s history is as interesting as its travels: the U.S. government accidentally sold it in 2015, then fought the buyer, Nancy Lee Carlson, a suburban Chicago lawyer, to reclaim it. The feds lost that case last year and ceded the bag to Carlson, who is selling it Thursday.

The legal kerfuffle concerns the disposition of an important cultural item that NASA and others don’t believe should be in private hands. Spurred by the auction, a curiously named nonprofit called For All Moonkind is pushing the United Nations to protect the six Apollo landing sites and lunar items such as the bag.

“What we need to do is to create, basically, a Unesco for space,” said Michelle Hanlon, a Connecticut attorney who is leading the effort, referring to the UN world heritage designation.

But as important as securing symbols of that first foray to a celestial body may be, the fight is a small illustration of the potential exploitation to come. As more nations and companies plan missions to the moon, the real fear isn’t of some spacefaring Indiana Jones so much as the impacts of numerous lunar landings or, say, a massive mining operation.

[ click to continue reading at Bloomberg ]

Your Daddy Is A Neanderthal

from New Scientist

We may have mated with Neanderthals more than 219,000 years ago

By Aylin Woodward

Ancient human skullsWe have a thing for Neanderthals – ZUMA Press, Inc/Alamy Stock Photo

It’s a sex-laced mystery. If modern humans didn’t reach Europe until about 60,000 years ago, how has DNA from them turned up in a Neanderthal fossil in Germany from 124,000 years ago?

The answer seems to be that there was a previous migration of early humans – more than 219,000 years ago. One that we’re only just starting to reveal from piecemeal evidence that is DNA extracted from fossilised bones.

The story, as far as we knew it, was that the ancestors of modern humans diverged from Neanderthals and Denisovans between 550,000 and 765,000 years ago. While Neanderthals and Denisovans inhabited Eurasia, modern humans stayed in Africa until about 60,000 years ago. Then they entered Europe, too.

[ click to continue reading at New Scientist ]

Space Hotel

from MASHABLE

Looking for a vacation splurge? Consider this space hotel

BY MARGARET SULLIVAN

A rendering of the space hotel MarinaIMAGE: MIT MARINA PROJECT TEAM

Do you have a hankering for adventure and several million dollars laying around? Then this might be the perfect getaway opportunity for you, if you can hold on tight for a few years.

NASA recently held a competition, which was won by a team of graduate students from MIT, to design a commercially enabled habitable module for use low in Earth’s orbit.

Translation: the MIT team basically just won a competition to design a luxury space hotel.

The hotel would float just about 100-1,200 miles above Earth’s surface, and be made up of eight inflatable rooms arranged in a circle, kind of like a ceiling fan, attached to a NASA space station at the center.

[ click to continue reading at MASHABLE ]

Romero Gone

from Deadline Hollywood

George A. Romero Dies: ‘Night Of The Living Dead’ Director Was 77

by Greg Evans

George A. Romero, the director who all but invented the modern zombie genre with his 1968 horror classic Night of the Living Dead, has died at 77 of lung cancer.

Infused with social commentary and a realistic, midnight-movie terror, Romero’s brazenly stark thriller, and the sequels that followed, made as large an impact on the genre and a culture’s nightmares as any horror film since the Universal Studios monster chillers of the 1930s.

The Pittsburgh native’s low-budget, black and white film went from cult favorite to blockbuster franchise with Romero’s 1978 sequel Dawn of the Dead, 1985’s Day of the Dead (1985), Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2007) and finally 2009’s Survival of the Dead. His take on the vampire genre, Martin, was released in 1978, and he wrote the 1990 Night remake, directed by Tom Savini.

As a producer, Romero delivered TV’s seminal 1980s horror anthology Tales From the Dark Side.

“Hard to quantify how much he inspired me & what he did for cinema,” tweeted Hostel director Eli Roth. (See other Hollywood reactions here.)

[ click to read full obit at Deadline ]

Oil Porn

from Dangerous Minds

ARTIST PAINTS ‘ORGASM FACES’ BASED ON STILLS FROM VINTAGE PORN FILMS 

by Cherrybomb

A painting from artist Alexandra Rubinstein’s series “Looking for Mr. Goodsex.”

In her bio, Russian born Brooklyn-based artist Alexandra Rubinstein notes that she is focused on “crushing the patriarchy one male figure at a time” and boy, do we need you now more than EVER Ms. Rubinstein. Alexandra’s works are quite provocative, to say the least—and even the titles of her work, such as her amusing 2014 series “Men Eating Pussy” which features paintings of men muff diving that was created using vintage stills from pornographic movies, though in Rubinstein’s paintings the female recipient has been replaced by “negative space.”

For this post, I’m going to focus on another one of Rubinstein’s collections “Looking for Mr. Goodsex.” For the 2013/2014 series, Rubinstein painted portraits inspired by un-cropped stills taken from films such as Deep Throat and others that originated during the “Golden Age” of porn.

There’s also a few pictures from one of her most recent accomplishments, a series called “Thirsty” in which the artist reproduced images from vintage Playgirl magazines then covered up the bare crotches of the vintage studs with fully functional, wall-mounted bottle openers. Rubinstein’s goal with “Thirsty” was to convey the role of a woman as a consumer for a change and not the object or vehicle utilized to promote or sell something. Since I’ve mentioned the words “porn” and “pussy” a few times in this post, I hope you’ve arrived at the conclusion that the images in this post are somewhat NSFW.

[ click to continue viewing at Dangerous Minds ]

Pieces of Donkeys Who Are Damned

from The New Yorker

The Toscanini Wars

No maestro was more revered—or more reviled. On the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of his birth, it’s time to give him a fair hearing.

By David Denby

What is the most familiar piece of classical music? The most thoroughly roasted chestnut? A piece so overplayed that it has passed into the automatic schlock-recognition zone of every American? Surely it is the final, galloping section of Rossini’s “William Tell” Overture—the Lone Ranger music, the musical image of righteousness on horseback. The music seems almost a joke. But there was one conductor who rode this piece as if his life, and the lives of his players, depended on it.

I remember my parents calling me out of my bedroom. The year was 1952, so I must have been eight. On our television, a tiny black-and-white screen sunk into a large mahogany console, an old man with a full head of white hair and an elegantly clipped mustache was beating time with his right arm and leading a furious performance of the horse music. I certainly knew the tune (“The Lone Ranger” TV series began running in 1949), but I didn’t know it could sound like this—the skittering string figures played with amazing speed and clean articulation, the entire piece brought off with precision and power, the muscular timpani strokes outlining phrases and asserting a blood-raising pressure under the crescendos. You can easily see this performance right now, exactly as I did, on YouTube: Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony in the televised concert of March 15, 1952. If you listen with good headphones, the sound, though hard-edged, is solid and clear, and the astonishing performance comes through. Toscanini was then two weeks shy of his eighty-fifth birthday.

For many years, Arturo Toscanini was the pinnacle of musical excitement for classical-music lovers in this country—and also for many casual listeners, who enjoyed the sensation of having their pulse rate raised. He was at the center of an American experiment in art and commerce that now scarcely seems credible: late in the Depression, in 1937, RCA, which owned two NBC radio networks, created a virtuoso orchestra especially for him, and kept it going until 1954. The NBC Symphony gave concerts in New York that were broadcast on national radio, and then, starting in 1948, on national television.

RCA hyped Toscanini, and the media responded gratefully, some would say shamelessly: Toscanini was widely profiled and photographed, lionized and domesticated by Life and countless other publications. His NBC years were probably the high-water mark of classical music’s popularity in America. Some of that popularity was doubtless swelled by the excruciating and often condescending music explainers ubiquitous on the radio, in books, in schools, all eager to sell great music to the masses. Still, it was not unusual for earnest middle-class children to struggle with an upright at home, to sing Handel in a school chorus, to play Mendelssohn in the school orchestra. At the time, both amateur and professional musicians, listening to the NBC Symphony broadcasts, did their best to play along.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

We Could Be Next

from The Daily Express

END OF WORLD WARNING: Watch biggest explosion EVER on Moon as NASA warns we could be next

A METEOR with the explosive power of TEN cruise missiles has struck the Moon – sparking a massive explosion visible with the naked eye.

By PAUL BALDWIN

MoonThe moon was struck by a meteor creating the an explosion visible with the naked eye / GETTY

And terrifyingly the 56,000 mph collision – captured by NASA scientists highlighting the catastrophic danger planet earth faces from similar meteors – was caused by a space rock weighing no more than 88 lbs (40 kilos).

Despite the meteor’s tiny proportions – about the size of a small boulder and the weight of an average 10-year-old boy – the impact damage was colossal and the explosion shone with the brightness of a magnitude 4 star.

A similar strike against a city on earth would create a crater 65feet (20m) deep and create a devastating kill zone equivalent to TEN Tomahawk cruise missile striking in exactly the same place.

Experts fear the death toll would run into thousands.

[ click to continue reading The Daily Express ]