Monty Hall Gone

from DEADLINE

Monty Hall Dies; ‘Let’s Make A Deal’ Host Was 96

by Bruce Haring

TV game show host and creator Monty Hall, the man who took Let’s Make A Deal from a daytime staple into prime time, has died of heart failure in Beverly Hills. He was 96 and died at home. His daughter, Joanna Gleason, confirmed his death to the New York Times. 

The show premiered in 1963 and, with some interruptions, continues to run. Contestants in outrageous costumes try to guess prices and see “what’s behind Door No. 1,” a line that bled into the popular culture.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Taco Bell Garb

from People

Taco Bell Is Launching a Clothing Line with Forever 21

RELATED: The Most Outrageous Taco Bell Menu Items of All Time

You’ll soon be able to wear your fast food pride on your sleeve—literally.

Taco Bell is teaming up with Forever 21 to launch a fashion line which they promise to be “hotter than Diablo Sauce.” We would be frauds (FRAUDS!) if we didn’t admit to kind of loving bargain clothing that displays a love of tacos.

The line, which comes out on October 11, includes a millennial pink pullover sweatshirt with the “Live Mas” logo embroidered on it and a tank top inspired by a fire sauce packet.

So far, the only items we’ve seen are those two pieces—modeled by Brittany Creech and Andrew McBurnie, super fans who you may remember bucked tradition and shot their senior portraits at Taco Bell.

[ click to continue reading at People ]

Ass Gold

from Reuters

Sri Lankan arrested for trying to smuggle 1kg of gold in his rectum

Customs officials find gold inside 45-year-old man after noticing his ‘suspicious movements’ at Colombo airport

A Sri Lankan man who raised suspicion by the way he kept looking around in an airport departure lounge was found to be carrying nearly 1kg (2.2lb) of gold stashed in his rectum.

The 45-year-old, who was headed for India, was arrested at Colombo airport on Sunday after customs officials noticed “suspicious movements”, said customs spokesman Sunil Jayarathne.

The man was carrying 904.77g of gold worth 4.5m rupees (£22,000), but was freed after a payment of 100,000 rupees, he said. Such methods of smuggling were not unusual, he said.

“The gold was wrapped in plastic bags inserted in to his rectum,” Jayarathne said, adding that there were four bags.

This is not the first such detection and this is a common method of smuggling.”

[ click to continue reading at Reuters ]

A Giant, Armed Military Nervous System. Cool

from Defense One

The Future the US Military is Constructing: a Giant, Armed Nervous System

BY PATRICK TUCKER

Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. John Richardson, gives a keynote address during the Naval Future Force Science and Technology (S&T) Expo, July 21, 2017. This is a slide from his presentation.

Service chiefs are converging on a single strategy for military dominance: connect everything to everything.

Leaders of the Air Force, Navy, Army and Marines are converging on a vision of the future military: connecting every asset on the global battlefield.

That means everything from F-35 jets overhead to the destroyers on the sea to the armor of the tanks crawling over the land to the multiplying devices in every troops’ pockets. Every weapon, vehicle, and device connected, sharing data, constantly aware of the presence and state of every other node in a truly global network. The effect: an unimaginably large cephapoloidal nervous system armed with the world’s most sophisticated weaponry.

In recent months, the Joint Chiefs of Staff put together the newest version of their National Military Strategy. Unlike previous ones, it is classified. But executing a strategy requiring buy-in and collaboration across the services. In recent months, at least two of the service chiefs talked openly about the strikingly similar direction that they are taking their forces. Standing before a sea of dark- blue uniforms at a September Air Force Association event in Maryland, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein said he had “refined” his plans for the Air Force after discussions with the Joint Chiefs “as part of the creation of the classified military strategy.”

The future for the Air Force? The service needed to be more like a certain electric-car manufacturer.

[ click to continue reading at Defense One ]

End Of The World Maybe Later

from CBS Philly

Doomsday Rescheduled: ‘Researcher’ Moves End Of The World To October

CBS Local — After Sept. 23 came and went without a rogue planet crashing into the Earth, some might think Christian numerologist David Meade would be out of the doomsday prediction

Meade predicted that a rogue planet named Nibiru would slam into the Earth on Sept. 23 and bring about a global apocalypse. NASA had publicly debunked the “Planet X” conspiracy theory in 2012, but it didn’t stop the self-published author from writing and speaking about the doomsday prediction.

Now that the fateful Saturday has passed, Meade has reportedly revised his schedule for the planet’s last day. The controversial doomsayer claims his Sept. 23 prediction was misinterpreted and that the world will actually end at some point starting in October. Meade now believes the new date will begin a seven-year period of world-ending events.

“That’s when the action starts. Hold on and watch—wait until the middle of October and I don’t believe you’ll be disappointed,” he wrote on his website. The former student of astronomy at the University of Louisville says his predictions come from deciphering codes in the Bible as well as other ancient markers like the Great Pyramids.

[ click to continue reading at CBS Philly ]

The Invisible Arrow

from WIRED

MIGHT ONLY EXIST IN YOUR HEAD. AND EVERYONE ELSE’S

by 

WIRED

Past. Present. Future.

In physics, they are all the same thing. But to you, me, and everyone else, time moves in one direction: from expectation, through experience, and into memory. This linearity is called the arrow of time, and some physicists believe it only progresses that way because humans, and other beings with similar neurological wiring, exist to observe its passing.

The question of time’s arrow is an old one. And to be clear, it’s not whether time exists, but what direction it moves. Many physicists believe it emerges when enough tiny particles—individually governed by the weird rules of quantum mechanics— interact, and start displaying behavior that can be explained using classical physics. But two scientists argue, in a paper published today in Annalen der physik—the same journal that published Einstein’s seminal articles on special and general relativity—that gravity isn’t strong enough to force every object in the universe to follow the same past»present»future direction. Instead, time’s arrow emerges from observers.

This all goes back to one of the biggest problems in physics, knitting together quantum and classical mechanics. In quantum mechanics, particles can have superposition. That is, one electron might exist in either of two places, and nobody can say for sure which until it is observed. Where that electron might be is represented by probability. Experimentally, this checks out.

However, the rules change when electrons start interacting with many objects—like a bunch of air molecules—or decohere into things like dust particles, airplanes, and baseballs. Classical mechanics take over, and gravity becomes important. “The position of electron, each atom, is governed by a probability,” says Yasunori Nomura, a physicist at UC Berkeley. But once they interact with larger objects, or become things like baseballs, those individual probabilities combine, and the odds of all those collective electrons having superposition decreases. That’s why you never see a baseball simultaneously disappear into the left fielder’s mitt while also soaring into the upper deck.

That moment when particle physics merge with classical mechanics is called decoherence. In terms of physics, it is when time’s direction becomes mathematically important. And so, most physicists believe time’s arrow emerges from decoherence.

[ click to continue reading at WIRED ]

Asteroid Chasing

from AP

NASA’s asteroid chaser swings by Earth on way to space rock

By MARCIA DUNN

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA’s asteroid-chasing spacecraft swung by Earth on Friday on its way to a space rock.

Launched a year ago, Osiris-Rex passed within 10,711 miles (17,237 kilometers) of the home planet early Friday afternoon — above Antarctica. It used Earth’s gravity as a slingshot to put it on a path toward the asteroid Bennu.

Osiris-Rex should reach the small, roundish asteroid next year and, in 2020, collect some of its gravel for return to Earth. If all goes well, scientists should get the samples in 2023.

Friday’s flyby was a quick hello: The spacecraft zoomed by at about 19,000 mph (31,000 kph). NASA took precautions to ensure Osiris-Rex — about the size of an SUV — did not slam into any satellites.

[ click to continue reading at AP ]

Grace

from Interview

FIVE MINUTES WITH THE LEGENDARY GRACE JONES

By Michael-Oliver Harding

In an early scene of the new documentary Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami, the ferocious songstress and boundary-smashing model—whose prior silver screen highlights include portraying an Eiffel Tower-scaling Bond henchwoman and a centuries-old vampire stripper—signs autographs for fans huddled behind a barricade. One of them asks if she’d ever act in another movie, to which she commandingly answers, “My own!” This sets in motion a globetrotting journey a full decade in the making, acquainting us with Jones’ loved ones while peeling away her enigmatic, larger-than-life persona.

Director Sophie Fiennes is with the avant-pop legend when she delivers powerhouse performances in a Dublin theatre, attends church with her mother and revisits her Pentecostal upbringing in Jamaica, sips Cristal in her hotel room in a fur coat and reconnects with her former co-conspirator (and father to her son) Jean-Paul Goude in Paris. Over the course of the film, the subversive 69-year-old performer—who reminds us men should be penetrated at least once “so they know what it’s like to receive”—reveals herself like she seldom has before. Judging by the outpouring of praise during a post-screening Q&A at the Toronto International Film Festival last week, audiences were relieved that the ageless diva—who once threw her baby shower at the legendary Paradise Garage dressed as a toy soldier—has lost none of her bite or risk-taking spirit.

When Interview meets her the following evening for an expeditious five-minute chat in the dining room of an opulent Yorkville hotel, Jones is feasting on a hearty meal of steak frites. “I have to eat and talk, darling, so I’m afraid you’ll hear my munching on your recorder.” And with that said, Jones proceeded, her wit unimpaired and her laughter as rip-roaring as ever.

[ click to continue reading at Interview ]

Party At My Place This Saturday

from RAWSTORY

The Rapture starts on Saturday as ‘Planet Nibiru’ collides with Earth — according to Christian numerologist

by SARAH K. BURRIS

End times and Rapture (Photos: Screen capture and Pixabay)

The end is nigh, according to Christian numerologist David Meade.

Citing verses in Luke 21:25 through 26, Meade thinks that the recent events like the solar eclipse and Hurricane Harvey are signs of the apocalypse. To make matters worse, there’s been an uptick in meteors falling to Earth. But rather than look at the science behind the increase in severity of storms or focus on the fact that most calendar years see two solar eclipses somewhere in the world, Meade sees a sign, The Sun reports.

“There will be signs in the sun, moon and stars. On the Earth, nations will be in anguish and perplexity at the roaring and tossing of the sea. People will faint from terror, apprehensive of what is coming on the world, for the heavenly bodies will be shaken,” says Luke 21:25.

“Men’s hearts failing them for fear, and for looking after those things which are coming on the Earth: for the powers of heaven shall be shaken,” Luke 21:26 continues.

For Meade, that translates into the end of the world and the Rapture being predicted for this Saturday, Sept. 23, 2017. Meade says he used numerological codes in the Bible to generate a “date marker” in the pyramids of Giza in Egypt.

Nibiru is “a supposed planet discovered by the Sumerians,” according to NASA. The first time it was predicted to fly by Earth and cause troubles were May 2003. It was also linked to the end of the world prediction for 2012.

“If Nibiru or Planet X were real and headed for an encounter with the Earth in 2012, astronomers would have been tracking it for at least the past decade, and it would be visible by now to the naked eye,” NASA explained.

Another passage in Revelation 12:1-2 predicts the second coming of Christ.

[ click to continue reading at RAWSTORY ]

Schrader on The Extinction Of The Human Race

from VARIETY

Paul Schrader on the Extinction of the Human Race and His New Film ‘First Reformed’

By Brent Lang

It’s no surprise that Paul Schrader, a filmmaker associated with such dark classics as “Taxi Driver” and “American Gigolo,” has a pessimistic streak. But it’s still bracing to hear him argue that humanity, as we know it, is unlikely to last through the next century.

In an interview at the Toronto Film Festival, Schrader said he believes that global warming is accelerating at such a rate that there’s little that can be done to arrest the ecological changes. His Cassandra-like streak informs “First Reformed,” his new drama that’s been screening to strong reviews at the fall festivals. The film grapples with issues of faith while also sounding a warning about the destruction of the natural world. It follows Ethan Hawke as a small-town priest who toys with becoming a suicide bomber in the service of a radical form of environmentalism. Schrader spoke to Variety about religion in film, working with Hawke, and why he believes the world will be well rid of the human race.

[ click to continue reading at VARIETY ]

South Park F†ckery

from The Hollywood Reporter

‘South Park’ Episode Triggers Viewers’ Amazon Alexa and Google Home

by Ryan Parker

The 21st season of South Park premiered on Wednesday and, as the show usually does, touched on multiple current topics.

The episode, “White People Renovating Houses,” mostly skewered the white nationalist movement, poking fun at members’ obsession with waving the Confederate flag.

But it was another aspect of the storyline that was messing with some viewers’ smart speakers.

Both Alexa and Google Home were featured in “White People Renovating Houses,” and the cartoon characters yelling commands at their cartoon models for 30 minutes played havoc on some actual Alexa and Home models.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Harry Dean Stanton Gone

from Fox News

Harry Dean Stanton dead at 91

Character actor Harry Dean Stanton, who appeared in such films as “Cool Hand Luke,” “Kelly’s Heroes,” “The Godfather Part II” and “Alien,” has died at age 91, Fox News confirmed Friday.

Stanton passed away from natural causes at Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles.

Before finding fame in Hollywood, the Kentucky native previously served in the Navy during World War II and fought in the Battle of Okinawa. After his service, Stanton pursued acting on-stage in a University of Kentucky production of “Pygmalion.”

Once Stanton moved to Los Angeles to further pursue his craft, he appeared in his first film, “Tomahawk Trail,” in 1957.

Stanton later landed roles in numerous hit films, including “Cool Hand Luke,” “The Godfather: Part II,” and “The Missouri Breaks,” which featured his lifelong friend Jack Nicholson.

Stanton’s film career continued to flourish in the ‘80s with classics, such as “Escape from New York,” “Paris, Texas,” and “Pretty in Pink.”

In 1990, he played an ill-fated private investigator in “Wild at Heart,” which was directed by David Lynch. The filmmaker went on to cast Stanton again in “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me” in 1992 and “The Straight Story” in 1999.

[ click to continue reading at Fox News ]

Trigonometry Revisited

from PHYS.ORG

Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.

The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry – the study of triangles – by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been hidden until now.

Known as Plimpton 322, the small tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now southern Iraq by archaeologist, academic, diplomat and antiquities dealer Edgar Banks, the person on whom the fictional character Indiana Jones was based.

It has four columns and 15 rows of numbers written on it in the cuneiform script of the time using a base 60, or sexagesimal, system.

“Plimpton 322 has puzzled mathematicians for more than 70 years, since it was realised it contains a special pattern of numbers called Pythagorean triples,” says Dr Daniel Mansfield of the School of Mathematics and Statistics in the UNSW Faculty of Science.

“The huge mystery, until now, was its purpose – why the ancient scribes carried out the complex task of generating and sorting the numbers on the tablet.

“Our research reveals that Plimpton 322 describes the shapes of right-angle triangles using a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles. It is a fascinating mathematical work that demonstrates undoubted genius.

“The tablet not only contains the world’s oldest trigonometric table; it is also the only completely accurate trigonometric table, because of the very different Babylonian approach to arithmetic and geometry.

[ click to continue reading at PHYS.ORG ]

The What?

from KCET

The 5, the 101, the 405: Why Southern Californians Love Saying ‘the’ Before Freeway Numbers

by Nathan Masters

1939_parkway_plan_1920.jpgThis 1939 plan, developed by the city of Los Angeles, refers to its proposed freeways by name rather than number. Priority parkways are highlighted in color in this 1943 reprinting of the plan from “Freeways for the Region.” Courtesy of the Metro Transportation Library and Archive.

Southern Californians have a distinctive – “Saturday Night Live’s” Fred Armisen and Kristen Wiig might say funny – way of giving directions. To get from Santa Monica to Hollywood, take the 10 to the 110 to the 101. Burbank to San Diego? The 134 to the 5. And, if you can, always avoid the 405.

Why the definite articles? After all, a resident of the Bay Area enjoys coastal drives along “101” or takes “80 east” to Sacramento. Most of North America, in fact, omits the “the” before route numbers.

The answer begins with the region’s early embrace of the freeway. Long before the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act of 1956 gave most U.S. cities their first freeways, Los Angeles had built several. These weren’t simply extensions of federal interstate highways through the city; they were local routes, engineered to carry local traffic and (partly) paid for by local funds. It only made sense that, as they opened one by one, they’d get local names, ones that succinctly denoted their route or destination. The freeway through the Cahuenga Pass thus became the Cahuenga Pass Freeway, and Angelenos knew the freeway to San Bernardino as the San Bernardino Freeway.

State highway officials did affix route numbers to these freeways. But clarity dictated that Southern Californians continue to use their descriptive names. In their early years, most Los Angeles-area freeways bore signs for multiple numbered highway routes. The Pasadena Freeway, for example, was Route 6, 66, and 99, all at once. The Harbor Freeway carried both Route 6 and Route 11. The Hollywood, Route 66 and 101. Who wouldn’t prefer the simplicity of a name over a confusing array of numbers?

[ click to continue reading at KCET ]

Creepy.

from The Telegraph

‘Inspirational’ robots to begin replacing teachers within 10 years

by Henry Bodkin

Robots will begin replacing teachers in the classroom within the next ten years as part of a revolution in one-to-one learning, a leading educationalist has predicted.

Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham, said intelligent machines that adapt to suit the learning styles of individual children will soon render traditional academic teaching all but redundant.

The former Master of Wellington College said programmes currently being developed in Silicon Valley will learn to read the brains and facial expressions of pupils, adapting the method of communication to what works best for them.

Automated teaching machines would be “extraordinarily inspirational”, Sir Anthony said.

“You’ll still have the humans there walking around during school time, but in fact the inspiration in terms of intellectual excitement will come from the lighting-up of the brain which the machines will be superbly well-geared for.

“The machines will know what it is that most excites you and gives you a natural level of challenge that is not too hard or too easy, but just right for you.”

He expected the National Union of Teachers to be “very alarmed” by the prospect.

[ click to read full article at The Telegraph ]