Franco Columbu Gone

from CNN

Franco Columbu, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s ‘best friend,’ dies at 78

By Lauren M. Johnson

Arnold Schwarzenegger stands next to Franco Columbu, hanging upside down, in this image from 1977.
Arnold Schwarzenegger stands next to Franco Columbu, hanging upside down, in this image from 1977.

Arnold Schwarzenegger is mourning the loss of the man he called his best friend — Italian bodybuilder Franco Columbu.

The 78-year-old Columbu was the best man at the wedding of Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver in 1986. He was also an actor.”

From the minute we met in Munich, you were my partner in crime. We pushed each other, we competed with each other, and we laughed at every moment along the way,” Schwarzenegger wrote in his tribute Friday. “I am devastated today. But I am also so, so grateful for the 54 years of friendship and joy we shared.”

[ click to continue reading at CNN ]

Dark Fate

from DEADLINE

‘Terminator: Dark Fate’: James Cameron On Rewired Franchise, Possible New Trilogy

By Geoff Boucher

EXCLUSIVE: James Cameron understands better than anyone that revisiting the past to alter the course of history is a dicey proposition at best, but that hasn’t stopped the Hollywood titan from taking on his latest cinematic mission: returning to The Terminator franchise that gave him the first signature success of his history-making career.

“It’s special,” Cameron said of the Terminator success that propelled him toward ever-grander spectacle projects like Aliens, The Abyss, Titanic, and Avatar. Sci-fi’s greatest showman moved on from his Skynet series in 1991, but now he’s reunited with his first great cinematic brand through Terminator: Dark Fatethe Skydance Productions and Paramount Pictures release that hits theaters November 1.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

The Person With a Phone on Their Face

from c|net

The fantasy of being disconnected

An overactive world is hard to break away from.

by SCOTT STEIN

Scott Stein/CNET

It takes a boat ride, in the middle of the Atlantic ocean, to get me to finally feel offline. Which makes me feel pretty sad. But it reminds me of the impossible goal I keep failing to attain: staying away from screens. Or, more accurately, the internet.

It feels impossible to disconnect because I work in tech. I review phones. I wear headsets (sometimes on vacation). I have watches on my wrists. What absurdity am I discussing, me being disconnected from tech? It’s more that I’ve realized my attention being sapped away. Or my kid saying to me, hey, spend less time on the screen. Which only proves that I’ve become known as the Person With a Phone on Their Face.

I’ve tried screen-time limitations, cutting off notifications and being in the present moment like Sherry Turkle, who’s studied online behavioral psychology for years, wrote about back in 2015 in her excellent book Reclaiming Conversation. I’ve never found screen timers to work. Not for me. They feel like fitness trackers without the coaching.

What has worked? Spending a week and a half, roughly, where I go as offline as I ever can. It’s become a tradition each summer: I’ve joined my in-laws to go across the Atlantic. I’ve done this, now, six times. 

I didn’t expect to be this person who cannot unplug. And you don’t need to be this person, either. But I’ve come to realize, the more I take this trip, that I love being forced to live without the internet.

[ click to continue reading at c|net ]

QUEEN & SLIM To Open AFI

from The Hollywood Reporter

Universal Drama ‘Queen & Slim’ to Open AFI Fest

by Etan Vlessing

Getty Images From left: Lena Waithe, Daniel Kaluuya, Melina Matsoukas

Universal’s Queen & Slim is set to open AFI Fest 2019, it was announced Tuesday.

The drama hails from Emmy-winning writer Lena Waithe and director Melina Matsoukas, who helmed Beyoncé’s “Formation” and the Nike “Equality” campaign, and stars Daniel Kaluuya and newcomer Jodie Turner-Smith, along with Chloe Sevigny.

Waithe wrote the script based on an original idea by best-selling author James Frey. Waithe also produces via her company Hillman Grad Productions, along with Matsoukas via her production company De La Revolución Films. Frey produces via his production company 3BlackDot, alongside Andrew Coles and Michelle Knudsen. Makeready’s Brad Weston and Pam Abdy also are producers.

Queen & Slim was financed by Makeready and will be distributed by Universal Pictures worldwide, with eOne handling distribution in select territories including the U.K. and Canada. The pic is slated to hit theaters Nov. 27.

[ click to read full article at THR ]

How Iggy’s Lived

from The New Yorker

The Survival of Iggy Pop

An inventor of punk rock on his long career, the future, and swimming in Miami.

By Amanda Petrusich

Stories about Pop’s misbehavior are lewd, captivating, and plentiful. In recent years, his work has grown more interior. Photograph by Ryan McGinley for The New Yorker

In late July, in a brief window between professional appointments, Iggy Pop drove to the mouth of Biscayne Bay, so that he could bob in its tropical waters. In 1995, he had bought what he described as “a very seedy condo” in Miami, and he has had a home in the city ever since. The extremity of the place—it is both environmentally tenuous and aesthetically vulgar—seems to suit Pop, who, in the late nineteen-sixties, as a member of the Stooges, helped invent and refine punk rock, a genre of music so menacing and physically savage that it is sometimes shocking that Pop has made it to the age of seventy-two. After he moved to Miami, he started swimming every day. “I didn’t know anybody,” he said. “I’d go to the beach and come home, go to the beach and come home. I tried to build myself back up from twenty years in harness—New York City, the modern American record industry, gruelling economy touring. I quit smoking here.”

From afar, Pop resembles a bronze statuette. He is lithe, sinewy, and deeply tanned, with a torso that, for decades, has appeared so exquisitely and minutely muscled that an onlooker might reasonably assume it was painted on. In recent years, his midsection has relaxed a bit, but he assured me, while patting it, that it remains quite firm. His hair is blond, shoulder length, pin straight, and parted in the middle, and his eyes are an oceanic blue. Though he has had Lasik surgery—“In Colombia, before it was legal here”—his vision is still imperfect, a malady he chalks up to doing too much intravenous cocaine. He has retained a bit of a round, Midwestern accent from his upbringing, outside Detroit. In conversation, he is nearly guileless, and he listens intently and carefully. Periodically, his face will collapse into a benevolent grin.

[ click to continue reading at TNY ]

More ST-J on A MILLION LITTLE PIECES

from The Guardian

Sam Taylor-Johnson: ‘I’ve lost people very dear to me through addiction’

The film-maker on adapting James Frey’s controversial rehab memoir A Million Little Pieces, whether she’s still making art and the joy of chickens.

by Tim Lewis

Since leaving the art world to become a film-maker, Sam Taylor-Johnson has shown impressive range. Her debut feature film, Nowhere Boy (2009), was a tender depiction of John Lennon’s childhood. She followed it with the less tender Fifty Shades of Greyin 2015. Now she’s back with A Million Little Pieces, an adaptation of James Frey’s scandalous semi-memoir about his rehab after years as an alcoholic and drug addict. Taylor-Johnson co-wrote the screenplay with her husband, Aaron Taylor-Johnson, who also stars in the film. They live, most of the time, in Los Angeles.

You read A Million Little Pieces when it came out in 2003. It obviously stayed with you?
Yeah, it did. I remember reading it and being really overtaken by it; I think is the right word. I was in the world with him and on the journey. Then when it got optioned by whatever studio it was and it was going to be made into a big movie and there was this director and that director, I’d always have a tinge of jealousy. Even though I wasn’t a film-maker then, I’d be like: “What an amazing piece of material to have.” So I tracked it for a long time and I’d always keep my ear to the ground.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Loud Enough To Knock You Down

from The Drive

Colorado Race Track’s ‘Largest Burnout’ World Record Claim Denied by Guinness

A total of 170 cars performed a simultaneous burnout at the KBPI Rock & Roll Car Show in Colorado, but they all forgot to do one thing.

BY CHRIS CHIN

Earlier this week, several videos shared to social media claimed to have broken the official Guinness World Record for the most cars to perform a simultaneous burnout. The video’s creators claimed that it was an “official world record attempt,” but now it turns out Guinness has reportedly denied the claim simply because there wasn’t an official judge present at the event.

The videos seen below show the record attempt at the KBPI Rock & Roll Car Show this past weekend at Bandimere Speedway in Jefferson County, Colorado from both the air and from spectators on the ground. An alleged total of 170 cars lined up along the base of a hill next to the Speedway’s main dragstrip. As the videos depict, a huge plume of white tire smoke can be seen from the line of cars as they all perform a stationary burnout.

[ click to continue reading at The Drive ]

Sketch Artist

from The Observer

Who Is Loretta Fahrenholz, the Artist Who Directed Kim Gordon’s New Music Video?

By Helen Holmes

Musician, style icon and provocateur Kim Gordon is practically inextricable from the art world. As the vocalist, bassist and guitarist for Sonic Youth, she helped solidify a streak of 1990s’ cool into an instantly legible visual aesthetic. Now, with the release of her debut solo album on the horizon, this week Gordon released a music video directed by the German experimental artist Loretta Fahrenholz that adds a fascinating new layer of nuance to her combative, bruising body of work. Fahrenholz, who is represented in New York by the gallery Reena Spaulings and in Berlin by Galerie Buchholz, may not be as well known as one of the biggest rock stars in America, but her perspective is just as demandingly intense.

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Frey and Taylor-Johnson on A MILLION LITTLE PIECES

from Vogue UK

“We Were Living And Breathing It”: Sam Taylor-Johnson On Making A Million Little Pieces With Her Husband

by LIAM FREEMAN

JEFF GROS

Vogue sat down with James Frey, author of the infamous 2003 memoir A Million Little Pieces, and his friend Sam Taylor-Johnson, who has directed her husband Aaron Taylor-Johnson in a hotly-anticipated film adaptation hitting cinemas next week.

The response to James Frey’s 2003 memoir A Million Little Pieces is the stuff most authors only dream of. His unflinching retelling of his alcoholism, drug addiction and subsequent rehabilitation, aged just 23, spent 15 consecutive weeks on the New York Times bestseller list. Three years later, in 2006, controversy hit when it was revealed that Frey had embellished certain details. Yet, while he was publicly criticised for this – in particular by one of his most ardent supporters, Oprah Winfrey; at the time, A Million Little Pieces was the fastest-selling book in her television books club’s 10-year history – his captive audience only grew, and to date it’s sold more than 10 million copies worldwide.

Frey sold the film rights to A Million Little Pieces in the early 2000s, however, the movie was never made. Until now. Directed and co-written by Sam Taylor-Johnson, a friend of Frey’s and director of Nowhere Boy and Fifty Shades of Grey, the film debuted at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival. Taylor-Johnson collaborated on the script with her husband Aaron Taylor-Johnson, who stars as Frey, and he’s joined on screen by Charlie Hunnam, Juliette Lewis and Odessa Young as Frey’s fellow patient and girlfriend Lily.

Vogue sat down with Frey and Sam Taylor-Johnson to hear about the making of the long-awaited big screen adaptation.

[ click to continue reading at Vogue ]

Chicken Wars

from The New York Times

A Popeyes Chicken Sandwich and a Tactic to Set Off a Twitter Roar

“Look at how much attention they’re getting — it’s impressive,” the executive editor of a trade magazine said.

Chick-fil-A, above, took on its rival Popeyes in a social-media match this week. 
Chick-fil-A, above, took on its rival Popeyes in a social-media match this week. Credit: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg

By David Yaffe-Bellany

The first Popeyes tweet seemed innocent enough — a photograph of the chain’s new fried-chicken sandwich (chicken breast, brioche bun, pickles, sauce) beneath an artfully garbled caption: “So. Good. Forgot. How. Speak.”

But as a social media battle has captivated the internet this week and generated long lines at Popeyes locations across the country, that tweet from last week now has the feel of an opening salvo. Things grew heated on Tuesday, when Chick-fil-A tweeted what appeared to be a coded response to the Popeyes announcement, extolling the virtues of its “original” chicken sandwich.

Popeyes replied a few hours later: “…y’all good?” 

Soon, the “passive-aggressive chicken sandwich debate,” as one news article put it, had escalated into a Twitter battle royal, as other fast-food companies started promoting their own sandwiches. Shake Shack tried to rise above the fray, promising a chicken sandwich “without the beef.”

As the Twitter commotion intensified, the Popeyes chicken sandwich reportedly sold out at some locations.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

A MILLION LITTLE PIECES Director on FIFTY SHADES

from THE LIST

Sam Taylor-Johnson would never want to repeat Fifty Shades directing experience

Sam Taylor-Johnson
Sam Taylor-Johnson

Sam Taylor-Johnson says she had an “intense and maddening” experience while working on the first instalment of the Fifty Shades of Grey’ film series

Sam Taylor-Johnson would “never want to repeat” the time she spent working on ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’.

The 52-year-old filmmaker, who is married to Aaron Taylor-Johnson, 29, confessed that her intense experience directing the first instalment of the erotic drama film series, based on the novel trilogy by E.L James, is not one she wishes to repeat. 

In an interview with the Sunday Times’ Stella magazine, she said: “Making that movie taught me so much that I didn’t want to learn and I would never want to repeat those lessons, but it did make me focus on what I do want to do.

“It was an intense; maddening experience – but then, would I have made this movie had not gone through that? It’s that thing of never looking back.”

The ‘Nowhere Boy’ director recently worked on 2018 drama film, ‘A Million Little Pieces’ – based on the novel by James Frey – which follows a young drug-addled writer coming to the end of his time at a detox facility.

Sam’s husband Aaron plays James and Sam revealed that after reading the book originally following its publication in 2003, she knew immediately that she wanted to transform the story into a film.

[ click to continue reading at THE LIST ]

People livin’ in competition

from The Atlantic

How Life Became an Endless, Terrible Competition

Meritocracy prizes achievement above all else, making everyone—even the rich—miserable. Maybe there’s a way out.

by Daniel Markovits, Professor at Yale Law School

EDMON DE HARO

In the summer of 1987, I graduated from a public high school in Austin, Texas, and headed northeast to attend Yale. I then spent nearly 15 years studying at various universities—the London School of Economics, the University of Oxford, Harvard, and finally Yale Law School—picking up a string of degrees along the way. Today, I teach at Yale Law, where my students unnervingly resemble my younger self: They are, overwhelmingly, products of professional parents and high-class universities. I pass on to them the advantages that my own teachers bestowed on me. They, and I, owe our prosperity and our caste to meritocracy.

Two decades ago, when I started writing about economic inequality, meritocracy seemed more likely a cure than a cause. Meritocracy’s early advocates championed social mobility. In the 1960s, for instance, Yale President Kingman Brewster brought meritocratic admissions to the university with the express aim of breaking a hereditary elite. Alumni had long believed that their sons had a birthright to follow them to Yale; now prospective students would gain admission based on achievement rather than breeding. Meritocracy—for a time—replaced complacent insiders with talented and hardworking outsiders.

[ click to continue reading at The Atlantic ]

Easy Rider Gone

from Dark Horizons

R.I.P. Peter Fonda

By Garth Franklin

The “Easy Rider” himself, Peter Fonda, has died – the famed actor passing away at 79 from lung cancer.

Fonda had an interesting childhood – a difficult and distant relationship with his famous father Henry Fonda, he accidentally shot himself in the stomach and nearly died on his 11th birthday, 

He made his Hollywood debut in 1963 with “Tammy and the Doctor” co-starring Sandra Dee along with WW2 drama “The Victors” the same year followed by Robert Rossen’s “Lilith” in which he received acclaim. He turned biker for Roger Corman in 1966’s “The Wild Angels” and a role in the Jack Nicholson-penned “The Trip”.

Fonda and Dennis Hopper then conceived, co-wrote with Terry Southern and raised the finance for counterculture hit “Easy Rider” which made over $60 million worldwide over three years from a $400,000 budget.

[ click to continue reading at Dark Horizons ]

Plants Are Clocks

from Yahoo! News

Plants can tell time even without a brain – here’s how

Anyone who has travelled across multiple time zones and suffered jet lag will understand just how powerful our biological clocks are. In fact, every cell in the human body has its own molecular clock, which is capable of generating a daily rise and fall in the number of many proteins the body produces over a 24-hour cycle. The brain contains a master clock that keeps the rest of the body in sync, using light signals from the eyes to keep in time with environment.

Plants have similar circadian rhythms that help them tell the time of day, preparing plants for photosynthesis prior to dawn, turning on heat-protection mechanisms before the hottest part of the day, and producing nectar when pollinators are most likely to visit. And just like in humans, every cell in the plant appears to have its own clock.

[ click to continue reading at Yahoo! News ]

Neuralink

from The Observer

Elon Musk’s ‘Brain Chip’ Could Be Suicide of the Mind, Says Scientist

By Sissi Cao

Elon Musk
Elon Musk says merging biological intelligence and artificial intelligence is important to help human beings deal with the AI apocalypse. JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images

Almost exactly a month ago, Elon Musk introduced a room of engineers and curious consumers to a sci-fi-sounding invention made by his neurotechnology startup Neuralink: an implantable “brain chip” that will “merge biological intelligence with machine intelligence.”

Per Musk’s description, this chip will be installed in a person’s brain by drilling a two-millimeter hole in the skull. “The interface to the chip is wireless, so you have no wires poking out of your head,” he assured.

Musk argued that such devices will help humans deal with the so-called AI apocalypse, a scenario in which artificial intelligence outpaces human intelligence and takes control of the planet away from the human species. “Even in a benign AI scenario, we will be left behind,” Musk warned. “But with a brain-machine interface, we can actually go along for the ride. And we can have the option of merging with AI. This is extremely important.”

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Campus Fight Night

from The Mirror

Inside student fight night where young men box unlicensed in front of glamorous women

EXCLUSIVE: Boxing’s governing bodies are deeply concerned about the lack of control surrounding white-collar events – but for ungrads in Cardiff, it is the night of the term

By Lucy Clarke-Billings Deputy News Editor

As punches are thrown, the crowd goes wild (Image: Gentlemen’s Fight Night)

Blood splatters across the ring as crowds of barely-clad women scream hysterically.

Two sweaty undergraduates are fighting for glory and their reputations are at stake.

Men clutching cans of Stella jump to their feet, bellowing “hit him” and “go on, son” at their flailing flatmates.

As the referee raises his whistle, a confused woman shouts: “Who won?”

“I’m not sure it matters,” comes the reply. “They’re both getting laid tonight.”

At one of the most popular university fight nights in the UK, students are battling it out to the delight of their peers.

Between bouts, glamorous undergrads in skin-tight mini-dresses dance in the walkways, swinging bottles of wine among friends.

Organisers of the event say they take a number of safety precautions including on site medical professionals, an accredited referee and insurance.

But the event is unlicensed and unregulated by the governing body for amateur boxing, which has repeatedly warned of the dangers.

Three fighters told Mirror Online none of them were medically assessed either before stepping into the ring or after.

[ click to continue reading at The Mirror ]