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Books Rule Comic-Con Yeah!

from Publisher’s Weekly

No Lack of Major Prose Houses at Comic-Con

By Rich Shivener

From samplers and author panels to signings and galleys of science fiction and fantasy novels, major book publishers such as Penguin Random House and HarperCollins are once again investing heavily in promotional materials for the five days of Comic-Con International, held at the San Diego Convention Center. The annual pop-culture convention draws more than 130,000 attendees and offers programming related to comics, film, books and related media. Book publishers see it as an incredible promotional platform.

Comic-con may celebrate comics but the fans are on the lookout for books and related media of all kinds. Over the weekend, HarperCollins and its partners are set to preview an interactive, multimedia project based on writer James Frey’s Endgame trilogy, which chronicles teens hunting for ancient keys that could save the world. At its core, the project is an augmented reality game that allows players, using their smartphones, to scavenge for items around Comic-Con. Endgame is also getting the film treatment by 20th Century Fox. Frey, HarperCollins, Google’s Niantic Labs and 20th Century Fox collaborated on the project, and they’re planning panels, signings, access codes to games.

Comic-Con is a fitting place to launch the project because of its media convergence, says Sandee Roston, executive director of publicity of HarperCollins Children’s Books, the division that publishes the Endgame series.

“The innovative mobile game adds interactive real-world experiences to Endgame, merging story with social activation to create a fully immersive world,” Roston told PW on Friday.

[ click to continue reading at Publisher’s Weekly ]

Posted on July 27, 2014 by Editor

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The End Begins October 7. ENDGAME Is Coming.

Posted on July 24, 2014 by Editor

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The Revenge Of Frey

from Publishers Weekly

BEA 2014: Big Children’s Books at BEA

By Diane Roback, Carolyn Juris, John Sellers, and Matia Burnett

TROS
Endgame by James Frey is HarperCollins’s big YA title of the show; it releases in September with a one-million-copy first printing. A Google-based game and an in-book puzzle are part of the series’ multiplatform concept, and a film is in the works. In other Frey news, The Revenge of Seven, the second-to-last title in the Lorien Legacy series, arrives in late August with a 400,000-copy first printing. Other big fall titles from Harper include the second volume in the graphic novel adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book; The Guardian Herd: Starfire, first in a new series (“It’s Warriors with horses,” said publicity director Sandee Roston); The Swap by Megan Shull, a Freaky Friday–style story set in in middle school; Madeline Roux’s sequel to Asylum, titled Sanctum; Falling Into Place by Amy Zhang; and Positive, a memoir from 19-year-old first-time author Paige Rawl about her experiences with bullying while growing up with HIV.

[ click to read full article at Publisher’s Weekly ]

Posted on July 6, 2014 by Editor

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Jim Brosnan Gone

from The New York Times

Jim Brosnan, Who Threw Literature a Curve, Dies at 84

By 

Jim Brosnan in Chicago in 1964. “The Long Season,” his groundbreaking 1960 book, began as a diary. Credit Associated Press

Jim Brosnan, who achieved modest baseball success as a relief pitcher but gained greater fame and consequence in the game by writing about it, died on June 29 in Park Ridge, Ill. He was 84.In 1959, Brosnan, who played nine years in the major leagues, kept a diary of his experience as a pitcher, first with the St. Louis Cardinals and later, after a trade, with the Cincinnati Reds. Published the next year as “The Long Season,” it was a new kind of sportswriting — candid, shrewd and highly literate, more interested in presenting the day-to-day lives and the actual personalities of the men who played the game than in maintaining the fiction of ballplayers as all-American heroes and role models.

Written with a slightly jaundiced eye — but only slightly — the book is often given credit for changing the nature of baseball writing, anticipating the literary reporting of Roger Angell, Roger Kahn and others; setting the stage for “Veeck — as in Wreck,” the vibrant memoir of Bill Veeck, the maverick owner of several teams; and predating by a decade Jim Bouton’s more celebrated, more rambunctious (and more salacious) pitcher’s diary, “Ball Four.”

[ click to read full obit at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on July 5, 2014 by Editor

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“With that tush, who’d need to be literate?”

from The NY Daily News

Olivia Wilde responds to GQ film critic claiming she is too hot to portray a writer: ‘Kiss my smart a–’

Olivia Wilde has a witty response for someone who claimed she couldn’t have beauty and brains.

The actress portrays a writer in the romantic thriller “Third Person,” but GQ film critic Tom Carson didn’t find her believable in the role due to her looks.

“She’s supposed to be a writer … but your belief in that won’t outlast (Olivia) Wilde scampering naked through hotel corridors,” Carson wrote in his review of the film. “With that tush, who’d need to be literate? Who’d want to?”

When Jezebel tweeted about Carson’s backhanded compliment, Wilde responded with acerbic humor.

“HA,” she tweeted Tuesday. “Kiss my smart a–, GQ.”

[ click to continue reading at NYDailyNews.com ]

Posted on June 27, 2014 by Editor

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Felix Dennis Gone

from The Financial Times

Felix Dennis, the improbable magazine entrepreneur

By Matthew Engel

Felix Dennis, center, with James Anderson, left, and Richard Neville, editors of Oz, after being found guilty of corrupting public morals in 1971. (United Press International)

Felix Dennis, whose death aged 67 was announced on Monday, was one of Britain’s most successful media entrepreneurs and by a long distance the most improbable. Reaction varied from amazement that he had lived as long as he did, to shock that such a seemingly unstoppable force had allowed a mere disease to get the better of him.

John Brown, a friend and business associate, compared him to Richard Branson in his willingness to court failure and, if it happened, shrug it off. “Felix had irrepressible energy, loads of ideas and faith in his own abilities. And he just charged ahead.”

He charged ahead out of the office too. Dennis had revelled in the Sixties lifestyle: “Free sex with no downside,” he would recall. “Women were walking down the street in miniskirts, in what looked like their underwear. It was almost too much for anyone to stand.” All his life there were a lot of cigarettes and whisky and wild, wild women – and drugs, including a spell as a crack addict. Some, however, thought that Dennis was inclined to overstate the quantity of drugs and sex, just a bit. He once claimed, in a newspaper interview, to have pushed a man over a cliff. And no one seemed to believe that at all.

He did find the time for a remarkably varied set of achievements. Dennis was a popular performance poet (particularly when he offered free wine from his cellar as well). He established the Heart of England Forest near his Warwickshire home, which now has more than 1m saplings. And he had a large, themed collection of bronze sculptures.

[ click to read full article at FT.com ]

Posted on June 24, 2014 by Editor

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Poetry Is The Key – and Not The Money.

from NY Times

Poetry: Who Needs It?

By 

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — WE live in the age of grace and the age of futility, the age of speed and the age of dullness. The way we live now is not poetic. We live prose, we breathe prose, and we drink, alas, prose. There is prose that does us no great harm, and that may even, in small doses, prove medicinal, the way snake oil cured everything by curing nothing. But to live continually in the natter of ill-written and ill-spoken prose is to become deaf to what language can do.

The dirty secret of poetry is that it is loved by some, loathed by many, and bought by almost no one. (Is this the silent majority? Well, once the “silent majority” meant the dead.) We now have a poetry month, and a poet laureate — the latest, Charles Wright, announced just last week — and poetry plastered in buses and subway cars like advertising placards. If the subway line won’t run it, the poet can always tweet it, so long as it’s only 20 words or so. We have all these ways of throwing poetry at the crowd, but the crowd is not composed of people who particularly want to read poetry — or who, having read a little poetry, are likely to buy the latest edition of “Paradise Lost.”

This is not a disaster. Most people are also unlikely to attend the ballet, or an evening with a chamber-music quartet, or the latest exhibition of Georges de La Tour. Poetry has long been a major art with a minor audience. Poets have always found it hard to make a living — at poetry, that is. The exceptions who discovered that a few sonnets could be turned into a bankroll might have made just as much money betting on the South Sea Bubble.

There are still those odd sorts, no doubt disturbed, and unsocial, and torturers of cats, who love poetry nevertheless. They come in ones or twos to the difficult monologues of Browning, or the shadowy quatrains of Emily Dickinson, or the awful but cheerful poems of Elizabeth Bishop, finding something there not in the novel or the pop song.

This is not a disaster. Most people are also unlikely to attend the ballet, or an evening with a chamber-music quartet, or the latest exhibition of Georges de La Tour. Poetry has long been a major art with a minor audience. Poets have always found it hard to make a living — at poetry, that is. The exceptions who discovered that a few sonnets could be turned into a bankroll might have made just as much money betting on the South Sea Bubble.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on June 15, 2014 by Editor

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Maya Angelou Gone

from TIME Magazine

Maya Angelou: A Hymn to Human Endurance

Maya Angelou in 1996.

Remembering a life of relentless creativity.

When Maya Angelou was 16 she became not only the first black streetcar conductor in San Francisco but the first woman conductor. By the time she was 40 she had also been, in no particular order, a cook, a waitress, a madam, a prostitute, a dancer, an actress, a playwright, an editor at an English-language newspaper in Egypt, and a Calypso singer (her one album is entitled “Miss Calypso.”) It wasn’t until 1970, when she was 41, that she became an author: her first book, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, told the story of her life up to the age of 17. That remarkable life story ended today at the age of 86.

In her last years Angelou’s work became associated with a certain easy, commercial sentimentality—she loaned her name to a line of Hallmark cards, for example—but there was nothing easy about her beginnings. She was born Marguerite Johnson in 1928 in St. Louis, Missouri. Her parents divorced when she was 3. When she was 7 her mother’s boyfriend raped her. She testified against him in court, but before he could be sentenced he was found beaten to death in an alley. Angelou’s response to the trauma was to become virtually mute – she couldn’t, or wouldn’t, speak in public for the next 5 years. She often cited this silent period as a time when she became intimately aware of the written word.

Angelou eventually regained her voice, but her life remained chaotic. She became a mother at 17, immediately after graduating high school. She bounced from city to city, job to job and spouse to spouse (she picked up the name Angelou from one of her husbands; “Maya” was her brother’s nickname for her). She spent years living in Egypt and then in Ghana. By the time she was 40 her life story and her distinctive, charismatic way with words had her friends—among them James Baldwin—begging her to write it all down. She finally did.

In I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings Angelou describes herself as “a too-big Negro girl, with nappy black hair, broad feet and a space between her teeth that would hold a number-two pencil.” Although generations of high school students have been assigned it, the book’s unsparing account of black life in the South during the Depression, and of her sexual abuse, is not easy reading. It is Angelou’s tough, funny, lyrical voice that transforms her story from a litany of isolation and suffering into a hymn of glorious human endurance. That extraordinary voice—dense, idiosyncratic, hilarious, alive—brought novelistic techniques to the task of telling a life story, and its influence on later generations of memoirists, from Maxine Hong Kingston to Elizabeth Gilbert, is incalculable. (Angelou also mixed fact and fiction, unapologetically, long before James Frey.) The themes she expounded in Caged Bird, of suffering and self-reliance, would be braided through the rest of her long life’s work. “All my work, my life, everything is about survival,” Angelou said. “All my work is meant to say, ‘You may encounter many defeats, but you must not be defeated.’ In fact, the encountering may be the very experience which creates the vitality and the power to endure.”

[ click to continue reading at TIME.com ]

Posted on May 29, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME: Million Dollar Cover

from The Guardian

Million dollar cover reveal for James Frey’s new Endgame series

Newsflash: Readers around the world are given the chance to win a million dollars in gold by solving the clues of a super-puzzle!

by Amber Segal

Endgame James FreyEmblazoned… Endgame: The Calling by James Frey. Photograph: HarperCollins

The first novel in James Frey’s Endgame series, The Calling, is set for release in 36 countries on 7 October 2014, and today publishers HarperCollins have revealed its golden cover. But there’s more!

As a surreal real-life tie-in, readers across the globe can solve clues both within the book and in the outside world to be in with a chance of winning the extraordinary prize this cover represents. Very mysterious! The prize, a million dollars in gold, is going to be displayed in a soon-to-be-revealed public location…

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

[ also check out USA Today ]

Posted on May 23, 2014 by Editor

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Buzz Books: Young Adult

from Publishers Marketplace

BEA In A Book, Featuring The Best of YA!

Available for free download now for Amazon KindleBarnes & Noble Nook, Apple’s iBookstore, the Google Play Books store, and Kobo.

This inaugural edition of Buzz Books: Young Adult provides substantial pre-publication excerpts from more than 20 forthcoming young adult and middle grade books. You now have access to the newest YA voices the publishing industry is broadcasting for the fall/winter season—for free to read on Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Google Play, Kobo and more.

Excerpts you can read right now include new work from established giants of the field (Ellen Hopkins; Garth Nix; Scott Westerfeld), authors best-known for their adult books (Carl Hiaasen; Michael Perry; Ben Tripp; Meg Wolitzer), and genuine newsmakers—including the first of James Frey’s attention-getting Endgame trilogy, which will include interactive elements developed in association with Google’s Niantic Labs.

[ click to continue reading at Publishers Marketplace ]

Posted on May 18, 2014 by Editor

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“A variety of scenes that reference gory, abusive and misogynistic violence” (or, Pre-censorship is so cool!)

from The New York Times

Warning: The Literary Canon Could Make Students Squirm

By 

A sophomore at the university, Bailey Loverin, and others have formally called for “trigger warnings” on class syllabuses that would flag potentially traumatic subject matter. CreditMonica Almeida/The New York Times

SANTA BARBARA, Calif. — Should students about to read “The Great Gatsby” be forewarned about “a variety of scenes that reference gory, abusive and misogynistic violence,” as one Rutgers student proposed? Would any book that addresses racism — like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” or “Things Fall Apart” — have to be preceded by a note of caution? Do sexual images from Greek mythology need to come with a viewer-beware label?

Colleges across the country this spring have been wrestling with student requests for what are known as “trigger warnings,” explicit alerts that the material they are about to read or see in a classroom might upset them or, as some students assert, cause symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder in victims of rape or in war veterans.

The warnings, which have their ideological roots in feminist thought, have gained the most traction at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where the student government formally called for them. But there have been similar requests from students at Oberlin College, Rutgers University, the University of Michigan, George Washington University and other schools.

The debate has left many academics fuming, saying that professors should be trusted to use common sense and that being provocative is part of their mandate. Trigger warnings, they say, suggest a certain fragility of mind that higher learning is meant to challenge, not embrace. The warnings have been widely debated in intellectual circles and largely criticized in opinion magazines, newspaper editorials and academic email lists.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on May 17, 2014 by Editor

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Little Shaq (from Shaq and Full Fathom Five Woo-hoo!)

from Shaq.com

Shaq to publish a children’s book series

Courtesy USA Today

Shaquille O’Neal can add a new title to his LinkedIn profile: “Children’s book author.”

The retired basketball player will author a new series of books called Little Shaq for early readers. It will be based on O’Neal’s childhood and feature a series of adventures of a young Shaq and his cousin Barry.

“I am excited to be working with Bloomsbury on this project that will reach young, independent readers,” O’Neal said in a statement. “Education is a cause that is very important to me and I love that this series will combine reading with my love of basketball. It’s a slam dunk for literacy!”

The first book is scheduled to be published in 2015.

[ click to continue reading at Shaq.com ]

Posted on May 15, 2014 by Editor

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TSP: Way, Way Over The Rainbow

from The Star Press

Way, way over the rainbow

Novelist Danielle Paige flips the script on the land of Oz in 'Dorothy Must Die.'

Farley Mowat – nature lover,

It’s possible that the old Wicked Witch of the West had a point.

Debut novelist Danielle Paige fantastically flips the fantasy script on the wonderful land of Oz and its denizens in “Dorothy Must Die, the first book in a new young-adult series.

Dorothy Gale, the plucky heroine from the L. Frank Baum works and classic 1939 Judy Garland movie, is now the big heavy, and it’s another girl from Kansas who’s tapped to take out the pigtailed menace and her little dog, too.

Amy Gumm, with her pink hair and knock-off clothing, is a teenager who’s willing to do anything to get out of her trailer-park life in Flat Hill. Though armed with tons of gumption, she’s not liked at school or at home, where her single mom leaves Amy to fend for herself in an oncoming tornado.

It’s a doozy, too, and like the one that took Dorothy on a magical journey decades before, this windy disaster transports Amy to Oz.

[ click to continue reading at The Star Press ]

[ click to pick DOROTHY MUST DIE now at Amazon ]

Posted on May 10, 2014 by Editor

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Farley Mowat Gone

from Quill & Quire

Beloved Canadian author Farley Mowat dead at 92

Farley_Mowat
Photo by Fred Phipps

Farley Mowat – nature lover, gadfly, and author of the Canadian classics Never Cry Wolf and Lost in the Barrens – has died at the age of 92.

The iconic Canadian author of novels, memoirs, non-fiction books, and books for children, was born in Belleville, Ontario, in 1921 (his father claimed he was conceived in a canoe). He enlisted in the army during the Second World War and was sent overseas, where he fought in the bloody and extended Italian campaign that cost many Canadian soldiers their lives. According to Sandra Martin’s obituary in The Globe and Mail, it was in Ortona that Mowat started drafting the manuscripts that would become the canonical children’s tales The Dog That Wouldn’t Be and Owls in the Family.

Beloved for his children’s writing and his passion for environmental causes, Mowat’s career was not without controversy. Particularly damaging to the author’s reputation was a 1996 cover article in Saturday Night magazine that claimed Mowat had exaggerated or outright falsified facts and other information in his first book, People of the Deer, set among the Inuit of the Arctic. The author of the article, John Goddard, also claimed infelicities in The Desperate People, the sequel to People of the Deer, and Mowat’s classic memoir, Never Cry Wolf. Years before James Frey was excoriated on Oprah’s couch, Mowat found himself forced to defend his approach to what is now known as “creative non-fiction,” saying he preferred truth to facts and that he wrote in a grey area between the two.

Perhaps Mowat’s most memorable defence of his practice occurred onstage at Toronto’s International Festival of Authors in 1999. When interviewer Peter Gzowski asked about his fidelity to facts in his writing, Mowat exploded, “FUCK the facts!”

Of his own writing, Mowat was self-effacing. “I’m a simple man,” he told Q&Qin 2008. “I loathe all talk of ‘artistry’ in writing.

[ click to read full obit at Quill & Quire ]

Posted on May 7, 2014 by Editor

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The Dark Side Of The Rainbow

from The Huffington Post

The Dark Side of the Rainbow: 9 Good Guys Gone Very, Very Bad

by Danielle Page – Author, ‘Dorothy Must Die’

When I told people I had written a book in which Dorothy Gale of Kansas was the villain, almost everyone had the same response: “Uh, what?”

The Dorothy of L. Frank Baum’s Oz books is the Little Miss Perfect of children’s literature. She’s got a sweet, wide-eyed innocence and an ever-optimistic outlook on life. She sees the good in everyone and tries to treat others as she’d like to be treated. Dorothy’s got her values in order too: this is the girl who could have been princess of her own personal fairyland, but decided to go back to Kansas instead–because she missed her family.

In the popular imagination, Dorothy Gale is about as Good as it gets. In my book, Dorothy Must Die (HarperCollins, $17.99), she’s a vain, evil dictator who needs to be taken out before she destroys Oz.

Where do I get off messing with Dorothy like this? Look, just hear me out.

I like Dorothy, I promise! One thing I love about Baum’s character is that, for all her sweetness, she’s no Pollyanna. She has a no-nonsense, Midwestern toughness about her that makes her easy to admire. She’s a nice girl, sure, but she’s not a doormat. Mess with her, and she just might melt you. (By accident, of course.)

[ click to continue reading at The Huffington Post ]

Posted on May 3, 2014 by Editor

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Cliffs Notes AutoGen

from The Washington Post

Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say

By 

Claire Handscombe has a commitment problem online. Like a lot of Web surfers, she clicks on links posted on social networks, reads a few sentences, looks for exciting words, and then grows restless, scampering off to the next page she probably won’t commit to.

“I give it a few seconds — not even minutes — and then I’m moving again,” says Handscombe, a 35-year-old graduate student in creative writing at American University.

“It’s like your eyes are passing over the words but you’re not taking in what they say,” she confessed. “When I realize what’s happening, I have to go back and read again and again.”

To cognitive neuroscientists, Handscombe’s experience is the subject of great fascination and growing alarm. Humans, they warn, seem to be developing digital brains with new circuits for skimming through the torrent of information online. This alternative way of reading is competing with traditional deep reading circuitry developed over several millennia.

“I worry that the superficial way we read during the day is affecting us when we have to read with more in-depth processing,” said Maryanne Wolf, a Tufts University cognitive neuroscientist and the author of “Proust and the Squid: The Story and Science of the Reading Brain.”

[ click to continue reading at The Washington Post ]

Posted on April 10, 2014 by Editor

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DOROTHY MUST DIE – Exclusive Trailer

from USA Today

Exclusive trailer: Preview the book ‘Dorothy Must Die’

Whitney Matheson, USA TODAY

Beneath that sweet exterior, Dorothy Gale is a cold, hard witch.

That’s the idea behind a new young-adult book, anyway — and I think it’s one that might prompt teens (and their parents) to take another plunge into the land of Oz.

In her dark new novel, Dorothy Must Die, Danielle Paige re-imagines the fantasy landscape we grew up with. Her world paints the Scarecrow as a character who “conducts inhumane experiments on winged monkeys,” the Tin Man as a trained killer, the Cowardly Lion as a “monster out for blood” and Dorothy as a power-hungry woman who must be stopped.

Today I’m debuting the trailer for the book, which goes on sale next week. Intrigued? A whopping 12 free chapters have been posted on Epic Reads. For $1.99 you also can grab No Place Like Oz, Paige’s prequel e-book.

[ click to continue reading at USAToday.com ]

Posted on April 8, 2014 by Editor

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Fahrenheit 1984

from BuzzFeed

9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature

by 

2. Fahrenheit 451 (1984)

Fahrenheit 451 (1984)Via en.wikipedia.org

Mostly text and a few graphics, and set five years after the novel concludes, protagonist Guy Montag is now an agent for the Literary Underground, whose sentries speak to one another in quotes from great books. His mission: break into the New York Public Library where illegal books have been transferred to micro cassette (Hey, it was 1984!) and upload them to the Undergrounds’ Information Network.

Ray Bradbury collaborated with the game’s designers on the script. Carisse McClellan is back as Montag’s partner in crime. There’s also a super intelligent computer named (what else?) RAY.

Enemies: Fireman, 451 Patrols, Electric Hounds.

Weaponry: A lighter called “The Flame of Knowledge.”

Can I Play It? You can download it here, then find a Commodore 64 or make your computer impersonate one.

[ click to read more at BuzzFeed.com ]

Posted on March 30, 2014 by Editor

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Atalanta’s Up For Sale

from The Sierra Vista Herald

Bisbee landmark Atalanta’s up for sale

Owner wants to move to Israel

Gallery Image

BISBEE — After 38 years in the business, Old Bisbee business owner Joan Werner is putting Atalanta’s Music and Books up for sale.

Atalanta’s in the old J.C.Penney’s building has been a jumping off point for many local writers and a favorite place to come for book signings by well-known authors like J.A. Jance since Werner opened the doors 18 years ago.

After Werner first bought the building, she has slowly been making changes, renovating it with eco-friendly materials and converting it to solar-power. It is the first business operation in Bisbee to be powered completely by the sun.

She moved to Bisbee on New Year’s Eve in 1974 and went to work for the old chili sauce cannery in Elfrida. Then she started working for Circles Robinson who owned the Red, Black and Green Record Store in the old Woolworth building that had been turned into a mini-mall. She began buying up used books, records and tapes and they split the profit from the sales.

Werner does have a person interested in buying the shop, but nothing concrete yet. She hopes to get $80,000 for it, which includes the first year’s rent and utilities. The space would then be leased year-to-year. Whoever gets it also gets a 7,000-member list of loyal customers.

For more information on Atalanta’s, check out the Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/AtalantasBisbee or contact Werner at (520) 432-9976.

[ click to read full at article at SVHerald.com ]

Posted on March 28, 2014 by Editor

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Dorothy Must Peek!

from MTV

‘Dorothy Must Die’ Will Change How You Feel About Oz — Get A Sneak Peek Now

Read three chapters of the upcoming YA book now.

By Brenna Ehrlich

Was the Wicked Witch of the West really that bad, or did she just get a bad rap? Was Dorothy really just a sweet-faced girl from Kansas, or a ruthless dictator? YA author Danielle Paige tackles those questions and more in her upcoming novel, “Dorothy Must Die,” a Oz revival story that makes “Return To Oz” look like a Disney-fied dream.

MTV News is exclusively premiering chapters four through six of the novel today. You can check out chapters one to three on Epic Reads, and the next couple excerpts later this week on Just Jared Jr and Hypable.

“Dorothy Must Die” — which comes just in time for the 75th anniversary of L. Frank Baum’s “The Wizard of Oz” — tells the tale of trailer park resident Amy Gumm, who gets swept away from her dreary life during, you guessed it, a tornado.

Landing in the familiar — albeit fictional — land of Oz, Gumm is surprised to find that it’s not all gumdrops and friendly (and cowardly) lions. Dorothy, along with Glinda, has grown mad with power, and it’s up to Gumm, and The Revolutionary Order of the Wicked, to bring Oz back to its former glory. Oh, yeah, and to off the pig-tailed one once and for all.

“Dorothy Must Die” will hit shelves on April 1 — and the CW soon enough — but you can check out a good chunk below right now-abouts. Read up!

[ click to read “Dorothy Must Die” now ]

Posted on March 22, 2014 by Editor

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A variation on the dos-à-dos binding format

from VISUAL NEWS

A Very Rare Book Opens 6 Different Ways, Reveals 6 Different Books

POSTED BY 

6-way-book

Book binding has seen many variations, from the iconic Penguin paperbacks to highly unusual examples like this from late 16th century Germany. It’s a variation on the dos-à-dos binding format (from the French meaning “back-to-back”). Here however, the book opens six different directions, each way revealing a different book. It seems that everyone has a tablet or a Kindle tucked away in their bag (even my 90 year old grandma), and so it sometimes comes as a surprise to remember the craftsmanship that once went along with reading.

SEE ALSO HOME SWEET TOME: A HOUSE CUT INTO A BOOK

The book, which comes from the Rogge Library in Strängnäs, features devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther’s Der kleine Catechismus). Each of the books is held closed with its own ornate metal clasp, and was probably far more decorative than useful. Just imagine finding where you left off! See more images of this book and other rare examples on the National Library of Sweden’s Flickr page.

[ click to continue reading at VisualNews.com ]

Posted on March 17, 2014 by Editor

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Keith Richards’ “Gus & Me”

from paste magazine

Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards is Writing a Book for Kids

By Chelsea Conte
Rolling Stones' Keith Richards is Writing a Book for Kids

It looks like Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards is back to writing, but not lyrics to songs. He’s penning a children’s book called Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar. The book is about Richards’ grandfather Theodore Augustus Dupree, who was in a jazz band and introduced the renowned talent to music at a young age.

“The bond, the special bond, between kids and grandparents is unique and should be treasured,” Richards said in an interview with the Guardian.

[ click to continue reading at paste ]

Posted on March 15, 2014 by Editor

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World’s Most Stunning Libraries

from Fodor’s Travel

BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE, SITE RICHELIEU

Where: Paris

Originally built in the 18th century, French architect Henri Labrouste renovated the Bibliothèque Nationale’s Richelieu site from 1854 to 1875, after he completed the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève. The Labrouste reading room now bears his name. The library’s collection includes rare books, illuminated manuscripts, prints, photographs, musical scores, and coins and medals that once belonged to French kings. Since the construction of the Bibliothèque Nationale François-Mitterand, the Richelieu library—undergoing a massive renovation through 2017—now hosts temporary exhibits, often culled from its impressive collections.

[ click to continue reading at Fodor’s ]

Posted on March 14, 2014 by Editor

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Killing Monster Frost

from The New York Times

The Road Back: Frost’s Letters Could Soften a Battered Image

By JENNIFER SCHUESSLER

Few figures in American literature have suffered as strangely divided an afterlife as Robert Frost.

Even before his death in 1963, he was canonized as a rural sage, beloved by a public raised on poems of his like “Birches” and “The Road Not Taken.” But that image soon became shadowed by a darker one, stemming from a three-volume biography by his handpicked chronicler, Lawrance Thompson, who emerged from decades of assiduous note-taking with a portrait of the poet as a cruel, jealous megalomaniac — “a monster of egotism” who left behind “a wake of destroyed human lives,” as the critic Helen Vendler memorably put it on the cover of The New York Times Book Review in 1970.

Ever since, more sympathetic scholars have tried, with limited success, to counter Mr. Thompson’s portrait, which was echoed most recently in a short story by Joyce Carol Oates, published by Harper’s Magazine last fall, depicting Frost as repellent old man angrily rebutting a female interviewer’s charges of arrogance, racism and psychological brutality to his children.

But now, a new scholarly work may put an end to the “monster myth,” as Frost scholars call it, once and for all. Later this month, Harvard University Press will begin publishing “The Letters of Robert Frost,” a projected four-volume edition of all the poet’s known correspondence that promises to offer the most rounded, complete portrait to date.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on February 5, 2014 by Editor

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The Author Chaplin

from AFP via Yahoo! News

Charlie Chaplin’s only novel to be released

Rome (AFP) – A virtually unknown novel by Charlie Chaplin — the only book the silent film comic ever wrote — is being made public for the first time.

“Footlights”, which will be unveiled in London later Tuesday, was written by Chaplin in 1948 and later transformed into his film “Limelight”, in which a washed-out clown saves a dancer from suicide.

The book is being published in English by the Cineteca di Bologna, an Italian film restoration institute which has been working with Chaplin biographer David Robinson on reconstructing drafts found in the Chaplin archives.

Charles Spencer Chaplin was born in London in 1889 to poor parents, who struggled to make a living as music hall entertainers. As an adolescent, he began working in music halls in Soho, before eventually becoming an actor with a theatre troupe.

According to Robinson, the relationship between drunken clown and desperate ballerina in the much later “Footlights” was likely inspired by his meeting with legendary Russian dancer Vaslav Nijinsky in 1916.

[ click to read full article at Yahoo! News ]

Posted on February 4, 2014 by Editor

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Let’s Read Physical

from The Telegraph

‘Wearable’ book allows reader to feel emotions of characters

Students have created a “wearable” book that enables you to feel the characters’ feelings as you read the story

By 

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a “wearable” book which allows the reader to experience the protagonist’s emotions.

Using a combination of sensors, the book senses which page the reader is on and triggers vibration patterns through a special vest.

“Changes in the protagonist’s emotional or physical state trigger discrete feedback in the wearable [vest], whether by changing the heartbeat rate, creating constriction through air pressure bags, or causing localised temperature fluctuations” the researchers said.

The vest contains a personal heating device to change skin temperature and a compression system to convey tightness or loosening through airbags.

The vest also changes vibrations to match the mood of the book.

[ click to continue reading at The Telegraph ]

Posted on January 29, 2014 by Editor

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Join New Canaan Resident & Author James Frey for Lunch

from Hamlet Hub

Join New Canaan Resident & Author James Frey for Lunch

Join worldwide bestselling author and New Canaan resident James Frey at The Bedford Post ‘Literary Lunch Series’ on Thursday February 27 from 11.30am – 2.00pm.

Frey is the author of controversial bestsellers “A Million Little Pieces”, “My Friend Leonard”, “Bright Shiny Morning” and “The Final Testament of the Holy Bible”. Frey is also the Founder and CEO of Full Fathom Five, a transmedia production company responsible for the New York Times–bestselling young adult series “The Lorien Legacies”. The first book of which “I Am Number Four” (2010) was made into a hit feature film by DreamWorks Studios. His next book, “Endgame”, will be released in October 2014 in partnership with Harper Collins, Google and 20th Century Fox.

This forthcoming event has caused a great deal of excitement in our household. My husband and I are avid readers of Frey’s.

A couple of month’s ago I attended the Anjelica Huston literary lunch at the Bedford Post, which was excellent. The informal style enables you to relax, chat, eat good food then listen to the author speak freely.

[ click to read at HamletHub.com ]

Posted on January 25, 2014 by Editor

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He didn’t show an ounce of self-doubt

from Psychology Today

You Remember James Frey?

Is he an example of a writer who completely outgrew his addiction?

by Stanton Peele in Addiction in Society

Recovery manual, or what?

It’s hard to summarize the James Frey story. He wrote a wildly best-selling memoir about his drug and alcohol addiction, A Million Little Pieces, in which it turned out he exaggerated the extremity of his behavior and for which Oprah famously confronted him on her show.One thing that was ignored about Pieces was that it was anti-12-step and that Frey opposed the disease theory of addiction throughout his book, including his stay at Hazelden (the name of the rehab was disguised).

“I’d rather have that (relapse and death) than spend my life in Church basements listening to people whine and bitch and complain. That’s not productivity to me, nor is it progress. It is the replacement of one addiction with another.”

“I know I won’t ever believe in the Twelve Steps. People like you keep saying it’s the only way, so I’m thinking that I might as well just put myself out of my misery now and save myself and my family the pain.”

“Addiction is not a disease…Diseases are destructive medical conditions that human beings do not control…I don’t think it does me any good to accept anything other than myself and my own weakness as a root cause.”

Everyone just assumed Frey was a 12-stepper, and that his book was a recovery manual—in his earlier appearances on Oprah he seemed to play to this assumption, without declaring himself one way or the other.

Flash forward. Frey took a hit from Oprah and his publisher, but he recovered to write several more adult best sellers and then started his own production company. In subsequent Oprah shows he and the host kissed and made up. Frey has emerged from the entire experience fundamentally unapologetic about it.

He was thrilling, condescending, rude, empowering, and haughty. “He didn’t show an ounce of self-doubt,” says Philip Eil, then a first-year nonfiction student. “Not a second of wavering. He was 110 percent that there was no truth, that he would live forever through his books.”

Meanwhile, Frey turned himself into a highly profitable industry (now called Big Jim Industries!) and wrote the best-selling young-adult series “The Lorien Legacies,” of which the first book, I Am Number Four, was made into a hit film by DreamWorks.

So, there is a lot of good news about Frey, and many people find Frey is an extremely good story teller and writer.

[ click to continue reading at Psychology Today ]

Posted on January 23, 2014 by Editor

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A MONSTER FOR TEA by Walter Williams

Order “A MONSTER FOR TEA” now at Amazon.com

Posted on January 20, 2014 by Editor

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PW Exclusive: James Frey Talks Endgame

from Publisher’s Weekly

PW Exclusive: James Frey Talks Endgame

By Rachel Deahl

credit: Leon Alberti

James Frey doesn’t do things in a quiet way. Since his literary career imploded after questions surfaced about the veracity of his addiction memoir, A Million Little Pieces, Frey has moved on to bigger projects. In 2010 he launched his own company called Full Fathom Five, to package young adult novels and series. While some in the press railed against the outfit as a “fiction factory,” it has been productive. FFF was behind the YA series-turned-film I Am Number Four and, yesterday, announced its most ambitious project to date: a multi-platform series called Endgame that will feature a geo-location game (created by Google), a series of books and novellas co-written by Frey (to be published by HarperCollins), and a forthcoming film adaptation (being produced by 20th Century Fox).

Endgame, for which the film rights alone fetched a reported $2 million, is the kind of elaborate project, exploiting IP across a range of media, that many in publishing feel is the future. Frey talked to PW about the series, the intricacies of orchestrating a story that will exist in multiple forms, and whether he’s still angry about being ambushed on Oprah.PW: Can you explain how the project came together? Were you conceiving of the storyline, initially, as just a book? A book and a movie?

JF: It was conceived as a project that would exist across multiple platforms, and that the story would be told in books, novellas, games, film, and TV. [We also knew it] would have a social media presence, and exist in places – such as search results and mapping coordinates and YouTube – that aren’t traditionally mediums for storytelling and writing.

PW: When did the gaming element come into play?

JF: My first conversations with Google Niantic were approximately a year ago.

[ click to continue reading at PublishersWeekly.com ]

OTHER MENTIONS…

— HarperCollins to Publish New Novels by James Frey – NEW YORK TIMES
— Google’s Niantic follows Ingress with Endgame – C|NET
— ‘Pieces’ Author Frey Has Multibook, Media Deal – ABC NEWS
— James Frey wins $2m deal for young adult SF novel – THE GUARDIAN
— ‘Pieces’ author Frey has multibook, media deal – WASHINGTON POST
— HarperCollins, Google’s Niantic Labs, 20th Century Fox Collaborate With Bestselling Author James Frey On Next Generation Cross-Media Project, ENDGAME – WALL STREET JOURNAL MARKETWATCH
— ‘Pieces’ author Frey has multi-book, media deal – THE JAMAICA OBSERVER

Posted on January 16, 2014 by Editor

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Going hot and heavy over Endgame

from Deadline Hollywood

Fox Takes James Frey’s ‘Endgame’ In Year’s First 7-Figure Deal With Google In The Mix

By 

image courtesy of THRUPDATED: 9:48 PMFox landed James Frey’s Endgame, and the deal was around $2 million with Temple Hill partners Wyck Godfrey and Marty Bowen. Details will be forthcoming, but Google is involved. Fox joins sister company HarperCollins, which bought publishing rights. Here is what the book’s about: In a world similar to Earth, there are 12 bloodlines, or races. Each bloodline has a champion between the ages of 13 and 17 who is trained as a warrior and is always ready to do battle. When they turn 18, the teen warrior behind them gets promoted. This has been the case for hundreds of years, but no one remembers why — they’re always ready for some sort of battle to take place, but it never does. But the tradition continues. And then one day they’re called to fight, and all the bloodlines but the winners will be exterminated. They’re fighting to be the last race. WME brokered.

EARLIER EXCLUSIVE, 2:56 pm PST: In the first bidding battle of the new year, Fox and Warner Bros are going hot and heavy over Endgame, a Hunger Games-type young-adult novel by James Frey.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline.com ]

Posted on January 11, 2014 by Editor

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R29: James Frey’s 6 Books You Need To Read This Winter

from Refinery 29

James Frey’s Reading List: 6 Books You Need This Winter

,  SENIOR EDITOR

openerEven if one of your New Year’s resolutions wasn’t to read more, we think we could all benefit from less Bachelor-watching and more Bovary. PS, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo was a book first. Jersey Shore wasn’t.

To help you get your literature on during the long, dark winter nights, we turned to author James Frey for a winter-reading hit-list. Whether you’re a fan of Frey or not, we think his six picks, which range from a tale of models-turned-terrorists to a kid’s book you’ll want to steal from your nephew, are the perfect (equally gripping) alternatives to, say, Emily Thorne’s quest for vengeance. PPS: Us Weekly doesn’t count as reading, either.

[ click to check the list at Refinery 29 ]

Posted on January 8, 2014 by Editor

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THE RAVEN (Harper & Brothers, 1884)

from The Library of Congress

LC banner
From the Rare Book and Special Collections Division
Title: The raven – [Catalog record]

LC Digital Collections Home | Higher Quality Images

Image 1 of 134,

LC Digital Collections Home | Higher Quality Images

[ click to view at The Library Of Congress ]

Posted on January 7, 2014 by Editor

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