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Bullshit 451

from The LA Times

Bulldoze first, apologize later: a true L.A. landmark

by Christopher Hawthorne

The razing of Ray Bradbury’s home and a reprieve for Norms are the latest reminders of L.A.’s fuzzy historic preservation logicArchitect Thom Mayne, new owner of the late Ray Bradbury’s home, says he plans to build a wall on the property that will pay tribute to the writer. (Byron Espinoza)

It was beginning to feel like a demolition derby.

On Tuesday, word started to spread that the canary-yellow 1937 house in Cheviot Hills where the writer Ray Bradbury lived for more than 50 years was being knocked down.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The next day, the preservation group Los Angeles Conservancy added an alert to its website that the new owner of the 1957 Norms restaurant on La Cienega Boulevard, a time capsule of the space-age L.A. coffee-shop style known as Googie, had been granted a demolition permit on Jan. 5.

By week’s end, Googie fans at least could breathe a sigh of relief. At a Thursday hearing on Norms at the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission, an attorney for the owner said that there were “no current plans to demolish the property.” The commission voted to consider the building for cultural-monument status, protecting it for at least 75 days.

[ click to continue reading at LATimes.com ]

Posted on January 17, 2015 by Editor

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Glenn Horowitz Goes To Manhattan

from The New York Observer

Glenn Horowitz Bookseller to Open New Midtown Gallery With Photos of Giacometti

By 

Glenn Horowitz. (Jill Krementz)Glenn Horowitz photographed by Jill Krementz on January 11, 2015 in his Manhattan apartment on Central Park South.

This week, Glenn Horowitz Bookseller will open its new Manhattan gallery space Rare, along with the inaugural exhibition. Located on West 54th Street, across the street from MoMA’s sculpture garden, the 1,000-square-foot gallery will showcase first editions, manuscripts, letters, archival materials, fine art, and decorative arts spanning the 19th century to contemporary. Its first exhibition, titled “Matter/Giacometti,” opens this Thursday, January 15 (with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.) and will examine Swiss designer and photographer Herbert Matter’s book of the same title.

The book is an intimate portrait of the (also) Swiss artist whose signature tall, thin, figurative sculptures (the results of years of experimentations with movements like abstraction and surrealism) have become famous worldwide. But Matter’s book is a highly personal project that took 25 years to create, published after his death in 1986 by his wife.

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Posted on January 13, 2015 by Editor

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“It’s definitely not a normal book.”

from New Canaan News

Novel experience: Hit the jackpot by tracking down clues in James Frey’s new book

Meg Barone

Bestselling author James Frey speaks about his new book, ìEndgame: The Calling,î to a hometown crowd at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Meg Barone / New Canaan NewsBestselling author James Frey speaks about his new book, ìEndgame: The Calling,î to a hometown crowd at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Meg Barone

Authors of the latest entry into the literary dystopian adventure take readers beyond the pages of their book and into a ground-breaking multi-platform reading experience and worldwide search for the key to a cash jackpot.

James Frey, a New Canaan resident and bestselling author of “A Million Little Pieces” and other works, partnered with Nils Johnson-Shelton to write “Endgame: The Calling,” the first of a trilogy, which was published in October.

During an informal presentation and casual conversation Wednesday with about 100 people at the New Canaan Library, Frey talked about his creative process, the inspiration for his latest books, and revealed that even he does not know the answer to its puzzles. The authors’ invite readers to follow the adventures of 12 teens as catastrophic events lead them on a global quest in search of three ancient keys that will save not only their bloodlines but the world. Readers must find the clues hidden within the stories to solve the puzzles.

The first person to find the key for the first book will win $500,000 in American eagle gold coins, currently held at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The monetary worth of the prize increases with each book in the series to $1 million with the second novel and finally to $1.5 million with the third.

“It’s definitely not a normal book,” Frey said.

“It’s breaking from the rest of the pack and incorporating the reader,” said Shafer Jones, 15, of New Canaan, who sat in the front row with his family. Frey apologized to Jones and his family for his use of the “F” word in his remarks — and then continued to use it.

[ click to continue reading at New Canaan News ]

Posted on January 9, 2015 by Editor

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Memoir-Novels

from The New York Times

What Accounts for Our Current — or Recurrent — Fascination With Memoir-Novels?

Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. This week, Leslie Jamison and Daniel Mendelsohn discuss our interest in narratives that blur the line between the real and the fabricated.

Leslie Jamison CreditIllustration by R. Kikuo JohnsonBy Leslie Jamison

Why do we like that space of uncertainty in which we don’t know what’s been invented and what hasn’t?

In May of 1856, a traveling panorama called “Arctic Regions!” arrived in Philadelphia, offering “a complete voyage from New York to the North Pole.” Posters bragged that it was “fresh from the hands” of a “great Master of American Artists” and could “transport us to the icy North,” promising a kind of paradox: that you could become aware of its artistic mastery by forgetting it was art at all.

This brings to mind a certain tension in how we read, as well, a dynamic David Shields has described in his relationship to autobiographical writing: “at once desperate for authenticity and in love with artifice.” There’s an electric charge in toggling back and forth between the shimmer of what’s been artfully constructed and the glint of what actually was. The reader is impressed by the panoramic architecture even as she forgets its presence.

This ambiguous territory has a more established place in poetry, a genre never filed into separate “fiction” and “nonfiction” areas on the shelves. But for narrative we’ve long been obsessed with partitioning the actual from the imagined, and the memoir-novel offers, finally, some relief from that Sisyphean taxonomy project. Shields describes the pleasure of “blurring (to the point of invisibility) . . . any distinction between fiction and nonfiction: the lure and blur of the real.”

So what’s the lure of the blur? Why do we like that space of uncertainty in which we don’t know what’s been invented and what hasn’t?

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on December 24, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME at New Canaan Library – January 7

from Hamlet Hub

James Frey Presents Endgame: The Calling at New Canaan Library

ENDGAME: THE CALLING by James Frey & Nils Johnson-Shelton is an engrossing novel at the core of a groundbreaking immersive, multi-platform reading experience. The ENDGAME trilogy follows twelve teens as catastrophic events lead them on a global quest in search of three ancient keys that will save not only their bloodlines but the world.

More than an apocalyptic adventure tale, each book in the series will feature an interactive puzzle comprised of clues that will lead to the location of a hidden key. The first eligible reader to solve the puzzle for the first book and find the key will win $500,000 worth of gold. Similar to the characters in the novels, readers will embark on their own hunt for a hidden key.

The subsequent two books in the Endgame series will have progressively larger payouts. For the lucky reader who is the first to solve the puzzle in the second installment, the prize is $1 dollars and a whopping $1.5 for the third book.

Join James Frey as part of the Authors on Stage on Wednesday January 7th, 2015 from 7:00 – 8:00pm in the Lamb Room.

[ click to read at HamletHub.com ]

Posted on December 22, 2014 by Editor

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Gift An e-Book This Holiday – People Love Books – FullFathomFive.com

And check out FullFathomFive.com for some great book ideas. Thanks.

Posted on December 21, 2014 by Editor

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Endgame : l’Appel de James Frey, interview Fnac

Posted on December 18, 2014 by Editor

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DOROTHY MUST DIE – Best Books of 2014

from KCUR Kansas City Public Media

Best Books Of 2014 For Children And Teens

By  & 

Books have the remarkable ability to enthrall, captivate and inspire. When kids are trapped indoors during the cold winter months books  can transport them into new and fascinating worlds.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and three Johnson County librarians review their top picks in children’s literature.

The Best Children’s Books of 2014:

From Kate McNair, young adult librarian at the Johnson County Library: 

  • Dorothy Must Die by D.M. Paige (Grades 8-12): Amy Gumm, the other girl from Kansas, has been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked to stop Dorothy who has found a way to come back to Oz, seizing a power that has gone to her head — so now no one is safe!

Up to Date Intern Eliza Spertus reads from “Dorothy Must Die” – CLICK TO LISTEN

[ click for all KCUR’s 2014 Best Book Picks ]

Posted on December 14, 2014 by Editor

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Gimme Books’ Star-studded Pop-up

from RACKED NY

Upcoming New York City Events with Zady, Coop & Spree, More!

by Rebecca Jennings

LOWER EAST SIDE—All weekend long, Gimme Books will host a literary star-studded pop up at 2 Rivington Street, where they’ll be appearances by authors Amy Sedaris, Meg Wolitzer, Emma Straub, James Frey, Laura Day, and the editors of Cherry Bombe. Meanwhile, peruse literary agents’ favorite books, Garance Doré-designed stationary, and t-shirts and bags by Prinkshop.

[ click to read more at ny.RACKED.com ]

Posted on December 12, 2014 by Editor

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Frey Rewrite

from The London Free Press

James Frey rewrites his story with ‘Endgame’ trilogy

By Mark Daniell, QMI Agency

When it comes to career reinventions, author James Frey is in a league of his own.

His latest project, Endgame, is a sci-fi series and a real-life puzzle. The prize? $500,000 in gold. It’s in a locked case that’s on display at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas. All you have to do is find the place on Earth where the key that will unlock the gold is located.

But first, a little history.

After his famous dustup with Oprah Winfrey following the news that he’d fabricated parts of his 2003 memoir, A Million Little Pieces, and its follow-up, My Friend Leonard, Frey became a pariah in the publishing industry.

He wasn’t fazed.

The writer bounced back with his Los Angeles-set Bright Shiny Morning in 2008. He followed that with his best-selling series of young-adult science-fiction books, The Lorien Legacies.

Frey also found time to reimagine the life of Jesus Christ in his 2011 “fiction” book, The Final Testament of the Holy Bible.

“I don’t ever want to have a career that you can pin down,” Frey says animatedly in a mid-afternoon interview at the head office of his Canadian publisher. “I always admired (the director) Stanley Kubrick because he never did the same thing twice. If you look at his films, they’re completely different from each other. It was just him, doing whatever he wanted. I always thought that was the way to do it, so that’s what I’ve tried to do.”

[ click to continue reading at The London Free Press ]

Posted on December 10, 2014 by Editor

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Mysterious Galaxy Moves

from the Mysterious Galaxy website

Mysterious Galaxy San Diego

MG Store FrontAbove photo is classic CMB Mysterious Galaxy

Effective December 6, 2014, our new address will be …
5943 Balboa Avenue, Suite #100, San Diego, CA 92111
________________________________________________________________
In May 2013, Mysterious Galaxy San Diego celebrated twenty years in business as an independent specialty genre bookstore. Our tagline, “Books of Martians, Murder, Magic and Mayhem,” encompasses the genres for which we are widely known: science fiction, mystery, fantasy and horror. In recent years, we have expanded our galaxy’s borders by participating in community events, creating events of interest to our customers, and partnering with local non-profit organizations.

Mysterious Galaxy has an active young adult program, providing authors to visit, read, and teach at schools that partner with us. Our MG Junior section reflects this program and our passion for young adult literature … which we all enjoy. Our staff is composed of passionate and knowledgeable booksellers, and we share our enthusiasm for our genres through hand-selling, great customer service, and regular reviews in our print and electronic newsletters, as well as here on our website.

We are dedicated to providing readers and book collectors with a great selection of books, many of them signed first editions. Signed first editions are a byproduct of the author events in our store and books acquired at conventions or directly from publishers and authors.

The owners of Mysterious Galaxy are Terry Gilman, Maryelizabeth Hart, and Jeff Mariotte. They met and began talking about Mysterious Galaxy in late 1992 when they recognized a need for a genre store in San Diego and saw it as a way to share their passion for books, bookselling, and a love of reading with their community. Mysterious Galaxy opened to much fanfare on May 8, 1993. Among the authors who celebrated the opening of the store with hundreds of fans were Ray Bradbury, David Brin, and Robert Crais.

[ click to for directions and to read more at MystGalaxy.com ]

Posted on December 9, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME – James Frey || Reseña sin Spoilers

Muchas gracias, Ian Mellark

Posted on December 7, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME Worldwide

Posted on December 5, 2014 by Editor

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Safe Reads: ENDGAME

from Safe Reads

[ click to view at Safe Reads ]

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Editor

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Rearguard Action For God

from NewStatesman

The books of revelations: why are novelists turning back to religion?

There is a sense that, in recent years, novelists have formed part of a rearguard action in response to Richard Dawkins’s New Atheist consensus. Philip Maughan talks to Marilynne Robinson, Francis Spufford and Rowan Williams about God in literature.

by Philip Maughan

In the half light: biblical narratives, religious ritual and Christian art have a renewed appeal for baffled unbelievers

Close to the end of White Noise, Don DeLillo’s 1984 novel about a professor of Hitler studies who will do just about anything to ease his fear of dying, an elderly nun reveals the secret truth about faith. “Do you think we are stupid?” she asks Jack Gladney, bleeding from the wrist at a Catholic hospital following a botched murder attempt. “We are here to take care of sick and injured,” the old nun explains in a halting German accent. “Only this. You would talk about heaven, you must find another place.”

All the crosses, devotional images of saints, angels and popes that line the walls of the ward exist merely as set dressing. “The devil, the angels, heaven and hell. If we did not pretend to believe these things, the world would collapse,” she says. “As belief shrinks from the world, people find it more necessary than ever that someone believe. Wild-eyed men in caves. Nuns in black. Monks who do not speak.”

“I don’t want to hear this,” Gladney moans. “This is terrible.”

“But true,” the nun says.

Perhaps this goes some way to explaining the unlikely popularity of religion in contemporary fiction. So far this year we have seen the strange sanctification of a thalidomide victim who died in childhood (Orla Nor Cleary in Nicola Barker’s dazzlingly manic In the Approaches), an avowedly atheist dentist lured to Israel by the leader of an underground sect (Joshua Ferris’s Man Booker-shortlisted To Rise Again at a Decent Hour), a high court judge, Fiona Maye, ruling on whether a hospital has the right to administer a life-saving blood transfusion to a teenage Jehovah’s Witness (Ian McEwan’s The Children Act) and, most recently, the voyage of a prim evangelical on a mission to outer space (Michel Faber’s Book of Strange New Things).

When you consider these alongside the large volume of books about Jesus published in the past few years – Colm Tóibín’s gory reimagining of the Gospels in The Testament of Mary, the enigmatic youth David from J M Coetzee’s The Childhood of Jesus, James Frey’s damaged Ben Zion in The Final Testament and Philip Pullman’s warring twins in The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ – you get a sense of bewildered fascination, of a sore that continues to itch.

[ click to read full article at NewStatesman ]

Posted on November 27, 2014 by Editor

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Frey On Kobo

from Kobo.com

The Many Sides of Endgame

5 Questions with author James Frey


James Frey (left) and Nils Johnson-Shelton

It all started with a simple goal: create an “experience.” After all is said and done however Endgame, the much anticipated new YA series by James Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton, may be the most ambitious multimedia experiment ever attempted in publishing.

Based around the story of a global game between 12 ancient cultures that will decide the fate of humankind, Endgame holds an elaborate code—one that will direct readers towards a key hidden somewhere in the real world. That key will open a case containing $500,000 in gold.

To enhance the hunt, Google’s Niantic Labs has made an alternate reality game based on the plot. Two more books are coming. Fox is developing a movie concurrently, and around it all is a scavenger hunt base on cryptic numbers, coordinates, and other details hidden in the book.

We caught up with the one half of the writing team, James Frey, an author best known for his 2003 smash hit A Million Little Pieces (and subsequent), to talk about the multifaceted new project.

What prompted you to branch out from writing for adults to YA?

Basically I branched into YA because I have a short attention span and I was kind of bored. I wanted to get away from the preciousness of the literary world and do more collaborative work, and also make stories for a different audience. I also really enjoy genre fiction in general and YA in particular, so I thought, “Why not?” I’m glad I’ve done it. It’s been a ton of fun and a real education and at times humbling. Endgame specifically has allowed me to do all kinds of things that I never would have the opportunity to do if I stuck with literary books—I mean, would I ever get to pitch Google the idea of making a mobile video game for Bright Shiny Morning or The Final Testament of the Holy Bible? No, I would not.

What were some of the challenges of writing for the genre? 

A main challenge for Endgame has been getting everything to work together in the way I want it to. Not just the story but the puzzle, the legal aspects of the prize, the collaboration with Niantic and the Alternate Reality Game, coordination with Fox and Temple Hill, getting Caesars to sign up for displaying the gold at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, the marketing, the promotion, the social media—all of it. As for the storytelling, my main challenge has been figuring out how to work with other writers. Working with Nils (my Endgame co-author) has been great, but there are still hiccups along the way. And I imagine there will be more as the Endgame world expands and gets bigger and bigger—but in the end these are all great problems to have.

[ click to continue reading at Kobo.com ]

Posted on November 26, 2014 by Editor

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JetBooks

from Publishers Weekly

HarperCollins to Provide Content for JetBlue

HarperCollins Publishers has signed on as the exclusive book content partner for JetBlue’s new inflight wi-fi program, Fly-Fi, which provides content to airline passengers. Beginning November 26, the publisher will provide excerpts from a selection of bestselling titles, and each e-sample will include buy buttons to a variety of retailers.

Excerpted titles include Flesh and Blood by Patricia Cornwell, Yes Please by Amy Poehler, Endgame: The Calling by James Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton, and Pete the Cat and His Magic Sunglasses by James Dean.

[ click to continue reading at PW ]

Posted on November 25, 2014 by Editor

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“Writers who can remember freedom”

from parker higgins dot net

“We will need writers who can remember freedom”: Ursula K Le Guin at the National Book Awards

Screen Shot 2014-11-19 at 8.39.31 PM

Ursula K. Le Guin was honored at the National Book Awards tonight and gave a fantastic speech about the dangers to literature and how they can be stopped. As far as I know it’s not available online yet (update: the video is now online), so I’ve transcribed it from the livestream below. The parts in parentheses were ad-libbed directly to the audience, and the Neil thanked is Neil Gaiman, who presented her with the award.

Thank you Neil, and to the givers of this beautiful reward, my thanks from the heart. My family, my agent, editors, know that my being here is their doing as well as mine, and that the beautiful reward is theirs as much as mine. And I rejoice at accepting it for, and sharing it with, all the writers who were excluded from literature for so long, my fellow authors of fantasy and science fiction—writers of the imagination, who for the last 50 years watched the beautiful rewards go to the so-called realists.

I think hard times are coming when we will be wanting the voices of writers who can see alternatives to how we live now and can see through our fear-stricken society and its obsessive technologies to other ways of being, and even imagine some real grounds for hope. We will need writers who can remember freedom. Poets, visionaries—the realists of a larger reality.

[ click to continue reading Master Le Guin at parkerhiggins.net ]

Posted on November 20, 2014 by Editor

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Amazon Books .book

from Sky News

Amazon Wins Right To Sell .Book Domain Names

The online retailer pays up to $10m at a private auction for the right to control and sell domains ending in .book.

An Amazon distribution centre in ScotlandOne of the online retailer’s massive fulfilment centres

Amazon has won the right to sell domain names ending in .book after beating off competition from eight other companies including Google.

It is understood to have paid up to $10m (£6.3m) at a private auction, just days after shelling out $4.6m (£2.9m) for .buy – but it was beaten to the rights to .cloud by Italian company Aruba.

Other top-level domains settled in recent days include .dog, .live, .online, .tennis and .chat.

The two remaining domain name extensions due to be auctioned off by 19 November are .dot and .apartments.

The auctions are a result of a decision by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (Icann) – which governs domain names.

[ click to continue reading at Sky News ]

Posted on November 14, 2014 by Editor

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Full Fathom Five Fiction Contest

from MediaBistro

Full Fathom Five Digital Hosts Fiction Writing Contest

By Maryann Yin

Full Fathom Five DigitalFull Fathom Five Digital, an eBook imprint headed by A Million Little Pieces author James Frey, is hosting a fiction contest. One grand prize winner will receive $10,000.

The judges intend to name four finalists; those participants will be offered a guaranteed publishing deal. Depending on the quality of the submissions, the organizers may present a publishing contract to non-finalists as well.

Only manuscripts that contain 50,000 words or more will be accepted; writers can turn in either original unpublished stories or self-published books. A deadline has been set for November 30, 2014. Follow this link to learn about all the rules.

[ click to read at MediaBistro.com ]

Posted on November 11, 2014 by Editor

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Insomniac

from thump

Pasquale Rotella: “When People Read My Book About SFX It Will Blow Their Minds”

By Aron Friedman

You could say that Pasquale Rotella is America’s answer to ID&T founder Duncan Stutterheim. In 1992, the same year that Duncan threw his first party in Zaandam, Netherlands, Pasquale organized his first illegal rave in Los Angeles. Just like ID&T, Rotella’s Insomniac Events has grown into a dance empire in the last twenty years, organizing events for hundreds of thousands of people.

Yet there’s an important difference between the two: ID&T is now part of SFX, and Insomniac is part of Live Nation – two competing music giants, both intent on world domination in the dance scene. During Amsterdam Dance Event a few weeks ago, we talked to Rotella about his role in LA’s rave scene, his plans to bring Electric Daisy Carnival to Europe, and his book that will come out in May.

THUMP: When did you start organizing events in LA?
Pasquale Rotella
: There was already a lively underground warehouse scene in LA in the late 80s. But when the riots happened in 1992, the police started shutting down all the illegal parties. Most of the promoters that remained were really shady. Sometimes they’d print flyers for fake parties, where you had to drive two hours to get there, only to find out that there was no party. The only parties that were still going were a few grisly afterparties where drugs like crystal meth entered the scene.

It had lost its shine. I missed the vibe of the old raves. But then I went to England and got really inspired. When I came back to LA, I threw my very first rave. My second rave, Insomniac, was exactly how I had pictured it. It was an illegal rave in a warehouse on the infamous Crenshaw Blvd. That was known as a really bad neighborhood, but the party was amazing. I decided to turn Insomniac into a weekly event, and after that it really took off. At first we’d have about 300 people there, but that quickly grew to 12,000 every week.

[ click to continue reading at thump ]

Posted on November 9, 2014 by Editor

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Endgame Straits

from The New Straits Times

Endgame by James FreyEnd game in mind

By Stuart Danker

The latest book from James Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton will keep readers busy deciphering the codes within, writes Stuart Danker

ENDGAME: The Calling is the latest novel by authors James Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton. The duo have numerous bestselling titles between them, namely A Million Little Pieces and I Am Number Four (Frey), and the Full Fathom Five series (Johnson-Shelton).

I recently had the opportunity to interview Frey in conjunction with the launch of his book. “Yeah, there are writers who tend to procrastinate. I do it sometimes. But to get going again, I just keep reminding myself that writing is also a job, and I have to work like everyone else,” he tells me.

He works on the premise that a few pages a day is all he needs to be happy with, and it is a pretty effective method, seeing as how he’s just put another book on the shelves.

For someone whose works have been adapted to visual media, Frey confides that he doesn’t always write with the intention of having his books translated for the silver screen. “The book is always the most important thing. I’ll never know if something will get made, so you have to assume the book will live only as a book.”

Endgame: The Calling takes readers on a journey through myriad cultures and places. Suffice to say, it would have entailed a huge amount of research to get things right. Frey credits the web as his source of research, saying that writing this book would not have been possible without the use of the Internet. As someone who combines more modern forms of media and marketing with traditional print, Frey definitely knows how to utilise the Internet to its maximum potential.

[ click to continue reading at New Straits Times ]

Posted on November 1, 2014 by Editor

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Bath

[ Buy ENDGAME: THE CALLING now at Amazon.com ]

Posted on October 20, 2014 by Editor

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What do you get when you cross two writers, Google, and three MIT Ph.D graduates?

from BUSTLE

James Frey’s ‘Endgame: The Calling’ Puzzle And 6 Experimental YA Novels That Twist How We Think of Books

What do you get when you cross two writers, Google, and three MIT Ph.D graduates? A YA book that is about to start a real-life treasure hunt. James Frey, in conjunction with his co-author Nils Johnson-Shelton, created Endgame: The Calling (HarperCollins) as an armchair treasure hunt, a novel that would include secret codes and clues to the location of — wait for it — a key that will unlock a bulletproof glass case filled with $500,000 worth of gold coins.

I’ll pause while you run to go buy the book.

OK, now that your Goonies-style treasure mapping supplies are in stock, there’s more. It’s not going to be easy. Those three MIT Ph.Ds? They are the ones that designed the puzzle and hid the key, so I hope your math skills are top-notch. And Google Niantic built the accompanying mobile game. This is no nonsense.

And, yes, I have read the book, but no, I am not already halfway around the world digging in abandoned wells, because my copy did not have the final puzzle. No hints. No spoilers. It’s up to you.

The story within Endgame: The Calling follows 12 teenagers who are all fighting to save their line of the human race in a game against each other. They’re solving riddles, as well, and the one who finds the key will survive. The other 11 and the rest of their heritage lines will be extinct. So, yes, their stakes are higher than yours are.

The teenagers’ story is a page-turner in itself, so just make sure you don’t pass by those clues too quickly.

Frey isn’t the first writer to test the bounds of what readers consider a novel. In the adult world, we have loads of experimental fiction from people like Shaun Tan, Italo Calvino, Ali Smith, and others. In YA, it may be more rare, but these six authors are stepping up to the plate with some novel (I had to) takes on creating books.

[ click to continue reading at BUSTLE ]

Posted on October 17, 2014 by Editor

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The First 21st Century Book

from Terry Ambrose

Is the first 21st Century book here?

Endgame by James FreyInternational bestselling author James Frey was in San Diego on October 15 to promote his new project, “Endgame: The Calling.” For this interview, Frey said that what he’s trying to accomplish in this new project is to marry technology with traditional storytelling to create “the first 21st Century book.”

“First and foremost,” said Frey, “Endgame is a book that tells a story like any other book. Hopefully, people will read it and love it and get excited by it. The book has a puzzle written into it and readers can just read the book and love the book or they can choose to engage the puzzle and try to solve it. The first person to solve the puzzle will receive a key that opens a case at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas with $500,000 of gold in it.”

Frey said this project was inspired by “Masquerade,” which was written by Kit Williams. Frey read “Masquerade” when he was ten-years-old and, like many others, holds fond memories of that experience. He said, “It was a book that I loved that I thought was awesome and that somehow became more than a book to me. It made me go back and read it over and over again. It got me excited about it, and it was fun and cool and weird and thrilling.”

[ click to continue reading at TerryAmbrose.com ]

Posted on October 16, 2014 by Editor

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It’s A Myth That Kids Don’t Read Anymore

from Bloomberg BusinessWeek

Print Alive and Kicking at Book Fair Feting Digital

Frankfurt Book FairA worker sorts copies of James Frey’s book ‘Endgame’ at the Oetinger trade fair booth at the Frankfurt Book Fair, on Oct. 7, 2014. Photographer: Arne Dedert/picture-alliance/dpa via AP Photo

The book of the future could be crowdfunded, self-published or tied to a video game — you might even have voted on a key plot twist. Still, there’s a good chance you’ll be able to read it on paper.

At this year’s Frankfurt Book Fair, the publishing world’s largest gathering, an industry that has been upended by digitalization and the rise of Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN:US) went in search of new business models. As reading habits change and e-books take center stage, the appetite for good storytelling is stronger than ever.

Verlag Friedrich Oetinger GmbH, a children book’s publisher that sells the Hunger Games series in Germany, is a case in point. While investing heavily in digital products and even creating its own coding unit, managing director Till Weitendorf isn’t turning his back on print.

For the first time, she said, representatives from gaming companies such as Ubisoft Entertainment were present at the fair in search of partners. The trend is already taking off. “Endgame,” a book by American author James Frey, is being turned into an augmented-reality game by Google Inc. (GOOG:US)’s Niantic Labs.

As it publishes the German translation of “Endgame,” Oetinger is also trying to ease the passage from offline to online reading with Tigercreate, a platform to transform illustrated children books into animated, interactive e-books. The process used to require expensive programming for each new book and device, according to Weitendorf. Around 40 publishers have already signed up to use the platform, he says.

[ click to read full article at Bloomberg BusinessWeek ]

Posted on October 15, 2014 by Editor

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Write Win Publish Cool

from Ridgefield’s HamletHub

Connecticut’s Full Fathom Five Digital Holding Fiction Contest

Written by Sally Allen

Connecticut-based e-books publisher Full Fathom Five Digital, founded by bestselling author James Frey, has announced a $10,000 fiction contest on its website.

“We are searching for some of the best original fiction out there, and hosting a contest to find it,” the post reads.

Submissions must be written for Adult, New Adult, and/or Young Adult audiences and fall into one of the following genres: Horror, Romance, Science Fiction/Fantasy, or Mystery/Thriller.

In addition to the one Grand Prize award of $10,000, four finalists will receive a publishing deal. Non-finalists will also be eligible to receive a publishing contract.

The contest opened Oct. 1 and continues through Nov. 30 at 11:50 p.m. Eastern Standard Time.

For the full contest rules and guidelines, visit the Contest page at Full Fathom Five’s website.

[ click to read at Ridgefield’s HamletHub ]

Posted on October 6, 2014 by Editor

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OFFICIAL TRAILER: Endgame Is Coming

Posted on October 5, 2014 by Editor

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“Autumn has arrived in the quaint commuter town of Darien….”

from The Times of London

James Frey: ‘There’s $500,000 prize to be won in my new novel’

Barbara McMahon

The latest book series by the Million Little Pieces author offers readers the chance to win half a million in gold

Autumn has arrived in the quaint commuter town of Darien, where the leaves are ablaze in a glory of gold before the cold weather sweeps in. This is the kind of quietly prosperous Connecticut town where masters of the universe kiss their picture-perfect families goodbye and commute to their Manhattan desks, a place where the well-ordered streets are lined with large mansions, complete with three car garages and expensively landscaped gardens. Both film versions of The Stepford Wives and the 2008 adaptation of Richard Yates’s novel Revolutionary Road, starring Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio, were filmed here.

[ click to continue reading at The Times ]

Posted on October 1, 2014 by Editor

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‘I want to make everybody who hates me give up.’

from The Wall Street Journal

James Frey Hasn’t Given Up on Writing

A decade after his controversial memoir, the author blends fiction and reality in a new way

“I want to prove them all wrong,” says James Frey, author of the contentious 2003 book “A Million Little Pieces,” and, more recently, creator of the best-selling series of young-adult science-fiction books “The Lorien Legacies.” “I want to make everybody who hates me give up.”

It has been a remarkable 10 years for Mr. Frey, who came under fire for fabricating parts of “A Million Little Pieces,” initially billed as his memoir. After he admitted that some of the details were fictional, he was excoriated on Oprah Winfrey’s couch, he lost a book contract and his agent left him. “I was toxic,” he says. “I was radioactive.”

But he didn’t give up writing. For his latest project, Mr. Frey, 45, blends fiction and reality in a different way. On Oct. 7 he will release “Endgame,” a novel that will simultaneously launch with a YouTube channel, 50 social-media accounts and a real-life puzzle. (A videogame will come soon after.) The first reader to solve the puzzle in the story gets $500,000 in gold coins, provided by Mr. Frey himself.

It’s the latest major release from his media and entertainment company, Full Fathom Five, which operates, Mr. Frey says, much like an artist’s studio. Just as the artists Takashi Murakami or Jeff Koons develop concepts and have assistants help carry them out, Mr. Frey comes up with most of the books’ ideas and hires others to write the final product. When the story sells to a publishing house, he splits the proceeds. For example, he came up with the plot for the company’s first book, “I Am Number Four,” hired a writer for the text and then published it under the pseudonym Pittacus Lore. It went on to become a No. 1 best-seller, and the film adaptation grossed $150 million world-wide.

Mr. Frey is working with about 25 authors, all of whom are paid anywhere from $5,000 to $50,000 per book, along with a percentage of any profits. (The percentage varies by contract.)

Full Fathom Five has sold about 60 books to publishers, and has released about 30. Mr. Frey smiles when he thinks of those who have doubted him along the way. After the release of his novel “Bright Shiny Morning” in 2008, he says that a critic “just ripped me to shreds, but then he said he might as well be firing paintballs at Godzilla, meaning I was Godzilla.” Mr. Frey remembers thinking, “That’s what I should try to do to everybody—make them feel like they’re firing paintballs at Godzilla.”

[ click to continue reading at The Wall Street Journal ]

Posted on September 25, 2014 by Editor

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“A book can be more than what’s on the page.”

from USA Today

Book Buzz: James Frey’s ‘Endgame’ has a golden prize

Kelly Lawler, USA TODAY

AP Treasure Hunter FugitiveReaders of the new ‘Endgame’ series from James Frey will have a chance to find a golden treasure. (But not this one, which is from the the SS Central America.) (Photo: Donn Pearlman, AP)

The treasure hunters of the world may want to dust off their tools.

James Frey’s new new novel Endgame: The Calling features an interactive puzzle which, when solved, has a $500,000 prize at the end. The puzzle will lead readers to a key, and that key will unlock $500,000 worth of gold on display at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas.

It’s the first in a planned trilogy penned by Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton, which follows 12 characters on a quest for three ancient keys that will save “not only their bloodlines but the world.” The subsequent two books in the trilogy will also have interactive puzzles with much larger payouts: $1 million and $1.5 million, respectively.

“The mega puzzle included in the first book deploys technology and social media in a way that brings people beyond their borders,” Frey said in a news release. “A book can be more than what’s on the page. It can take you out into the real world; it can take you out into the digital world. The stakes are not only high for the characters in Endgame, they are high for the readers who try to solve the puzzle too.”

[ click to continue reading at USA Today ]

Posted on September 23, 2014 by Editor

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“A unique dystopian adventure with anchors to the real world… set to become a cultural phenomenon.”

from Kate’s Harper News

Kids Books: Endgame: The Calling – James Frey

Folks in the kids department have spent a long time getting ready for this juggernaut from James Frey (of I am Number Four fame) and his co-writer is Nils Johnson-Shelton, author of several bestselling children’s series.

Inspired in part by the 1987 megahit Masquerade, this inaugural book in a dystopian adventure series incorporates an elaborate puzzle for which Frey has brought on professional cryptographers.

The puzzle invites readers into Endgame in a very real way: like Masquerade, there’s actual gold—in this case bullion worth “hundreds of thousands of dollars”– for the reader who solves the puzzle at the heart of Endgame.

Here’s Frey explaining the project:

There’s more about the prize in USA Today’s 9/22/14 “Book Buzz” column: James Frey’s ‘Endgame” has a golden prize.

“A unique dystopian adventure with anchors to the real world… set to become a cultural phenomenon.”
— ALA Booklist

[ click to continue reading at http://KatesHarperNews.wordpress.com ]

Posted on September 21, 2014 by Editor

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“I have never loved dialogue in a novel more….”

from The Guardian

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige – review

‘Dorothy was a monster. A completely terrifying, sweet-talking, party-obsessed, mean, creepy monster’

Danielle Paige, Dorothy Must Die Amy Gumm was just a girl from Kansas: unpopular, lippy and practically hunted by her school’s very own personal demon, the “ever lovely” Madison Pendleton. Then, one day, a tornado hits her home and Amy is swept away to Oz. Only, it’s not the Oz she’s read about, this Oz has no cheerful munchkins or joyful parades; here in Oz Dorothy rules, and Oz has paid a heavy price for it. Torture, imprisonment and evil punishments are all Amy finds in this new, drained version of the magical land she knew as a child, and she’s a much bigger part of it than she thinks. She’s been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked with one mission and one mission only: Dorothy must die.

I’ll admit, at first I didn’t understand all the hype over this book; I mean, a retelling of the Wizard of Oz where Dorothy is evil? It kind of just sounded bizarre. But THEN, I read it and whoa. This book was insanely addictive, it blew me away on so many different levels. Dorothy was a monster. A completely terrifying, sweet-talking, party-obsessed, mean, creepy monster. She is the queen of evil characters in YA. Her insanity just pours out of the pages along with her unnatural lip glossed smile and hypnotic red heels. Yes, the ruby slippers are hypnotic. Paige went there.

As for our heroine Amy Gumm, how can we not adore her? She’s feisty, brave, insecure, grounded, sarcastic (ALWAYS sarcastic, I have never loved dialogue in a novel more) and most importantly, real! She isn’t your typical, crazy talented, beautiful selfless character, she has a real story and a personality you can really relate to.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on September 14, 2014 by Editor

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