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Full Fathom Five Digital’s Samantha Streger on “Getting Past Genre in Digital Acquisitions”

from Digital Book World

Getting Past Genre in Digital Acquisitions

By:

SSF3The growth of ebook publishing has heralded the growth of genre publishing—and it’s no wonder: Readers gravitate toward online communities that mirror their interests. By publishing genre-oriented ebooks, publishers and authors can cater to established communities of readers.

And since ebooks can often be produced inexpensively and sold at lower prices than many of their print counterparts, they’re perfect for those communities of voracious readers. At the height of the ebook boom, a low-priced, commercial genre title could find amazing traction. The author Amanda Hocking is one famous example of this type of success. Between 2010 and 2011, her self-published, $2.99 paranormal romance ebooks sold over a million units.

But the boom years are over, and many of the hit-making formulas acquiring editors and indie authors developed just a few years ago are bringing diminishing returns. Facing a much more competitive market than ever before, digital fiction publishers need to rethink their acquisition strategies.

Today, a paranormal romance ebook priced at $2.99 is just one of many thousands of paranormal romance ebooks priced at $2.99 or less. And that’s to say nothing of the huge number of ebooks that are available for free. Many publishers have found that the value of giving away free ebooks in order to build up reviews has all but disappeared.

Genre fiction in particular risks becoming a victim of its own success. Because it’s become an established winner in the digital space, the marketplace is now so over-saturated that digital publishers can’t afford not to think more creatively about how they acquire new content.

That was our guiding principle in October 2014 when we launched Full Fathom Five Digital. We planned to release commercial fantasy, romance, horror and thriller ebooks—but how to stand out in a sea of these genres? The experiment is still in its early days, but we’ve already learned a lot about what seems to work and what doesn’t when it comes to digital acquisitions. Here are five of them:

[ click to continue reading at Digital Book World ]

Posted on June 3, 2015 by Editor

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Thank you Thank you iKrimson

from Deviant Art

[ click to view at DeviantArt.com ]

Posted on June 2, 2015 by Editor

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‘Please give me another book.’

from Bend, Oregon’s The Bulletin

Best-selling author to launch imprint for children’s books

By Alexandra Alter / New York Times News Service

Novelist James Patterson is so prolific, his annual output rivals that of many small publishing houses. Last year, with help from his stable of co-authors, he published 16 novels and sold around 20 million copies of his books.

Now Patterson is seeking to extend his brand further, by creating his own publishing imprint, Jimmy Patterson.

The imprint, which will be part of Little, Brown & Co., will release eight to 12 children’s books a year, with a focus on middle grade and young adult fiction.

Patterson will oversee it all, choosing manuscripts and shaping the marketing plan for each title. He will publish four to six of his own children’s books a year under the new imprint and will acquire books by other writers.

“We’re not going to buy a lot of books, but if we buy them, we’re going to publish them with gusto,” said Patterson, who announced the initiative during BookExpo America, the publishing industry’s annual trade convention.

A handful of other writers have moved into publishing roles and created their own imprints and book packaging businesses. Author Lizzie Skurnick started a young adult imprint, Lizzie Skurnick Books, which publishes new editions of classic young adult novels dating from the 1930s to the 1980s. Novelists Lauren Oliver and James Frey both created their own book packaging companies, allowing them to acquire and commission works by other writers and sell them to publishers.

[ click to read full article at The Bulletin ]

Posted on May 31, 2015 by Editor

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Here’s a tasty one to end the week.

from Deadline Hollywood

James Frey Sci-Fi Book Proposal Has Fox 2000 & Publishers In Launch Mode

by 

EXCLUSIVE: Here’s a tasty one to end the week. I’m hearing that James Frey has hatched a proposal for an untitled science fiction space franchise: book publishers are hot and bothered, and Fox 2000 is in talks to set it up as a feature with Marisa Paiva overseeing for the studio. The working title is Space Runners, but I don’t have any more specific information than that. This would be produced by Joe and Anthony Russo, who’d be producing with Frey and Mike Larocca. from the Russo’s Getaway Productions banner. They are already plenty busy as directors, with Captain America: Civil War, the next two Avengers installments, and the Ghostbustersspinoff that has Channing Tatum attached.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline.com ]

Posted on May 30, 2015 by Editor

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Ignore the critics because what do they know?

from The Telegraph

10 rules for making it as a writer, by Dennis Lehane

By , Arts and Entertainment Editor

Dennis Lehane at Hay Festival 2015Dennis Lehane, author of Mystic River, at the 2015 Hay Festival Photo: Warren Allott

Dennis Lehane is the author of a dozen novels including Mystic River, Gone Baby Gone and Shutter Island. His television credits include seasons of The Wire and Boardwalk Empire. His latest book, World Gone By, is out now.

Read whatever you can lay your hands on

We were working class. There were no books. There were some encyclopaedias – I always say it was the day my father didn’t see the salesman coming. And there was a Bible. I read the Bible from cover to cover when I was a kid. The Bible is an amazing piece of narrative storytelling. Then my mother heard from the nuns – probably the only nice thing a nun ever said about me – that I liked to read. So my mother took me to the library. To this day, I’m a big benefactor of libraries. Without libraries I couldn’t be sitting here.

Write out of necessity

I started writing when I was too poor to go out and entertain myself. I was living in an over-55s community in Florida where my parents had a little house. I was broke and staying at their house. I was 25 and had no money. I said, ‘I’m going to write to entertain myself.’

[ click to continue reading at The Telegraph ]

Posted on May 28, 2015 by Editor

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Amazon Picks Up Alex Morgan and Full Fathom Five’s Kid Series THE KICKS

from The Hollywood Reporter

Amazon Greenlights Six Kids Pilots

Amazon Prime members will be able to watch and vote on the four animated episodes and two live-action episodes during the company's next kids pilot season this summer. Amazon’s new live-action kids pilot, ‘The Kicks,’ is based on a book series by U.S. soccer star Alex Morgan.

Amazon Prime members will be able to watch and vote on the four animated episodes and two live-action episodes during the company’s next kids pilot season this summer.

Amazon Studios has greenlit six kids pilots, which will debut during its next kids pilot season this summer.

The order includes four animated pilots — The Adventures of Knickerbock Teetertop, Lost In Oz, Lily the Unicorn and Bear in Underwear — and two live-action pilots — A History of Radness and The Kicks.

Amazon Prime members will be able to watch and provide feedback on which pilots they want turned into Amazon original series.

“These new pilots will bring sophisticated stories and unique points of view that we hope will resonate well with kids and families,” Amazon Studios’ head of kids programming, Tara Sorensen, said in a statement. “We’re very excited to be working with such passionate creative teams and look forward to sharing these projects with our customers later this year.”

Amazon’s latest pilots feature an accomplished roster of creative talent.

The Kicks, about a star soccer player who switches schools and has to rally her new team, is based on a book series by U.S. women’s soccer player, and Olympic gold medalist, Alex Morgan. The series was adapted for the pilot by David Babcock, whose credits include Brothers & Sisters and Gilmore Girls. The project’s executive producers include novelist James Frey and his company Full Fathom Five. The pilot was directed by Elizabeth Allen Rosenbaum, whose credits include Ramona & Beezus and Aquamarine.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

VARIETY – Amazon Studios Greenlights 6 Pilots in Next Wave of Kids’ Programming

 

Posted on May 17, 2015 by Editor

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Dorothy Must 5 (NYT Bestseller List Woo-hoo!!)

from The New York Times

Dot5

[ click to check out I AM NUMBER FOUR on the NYT List, too! ]

[ BUY DOROTHY MUST DIE Now – Read it this weekend ]

Posted on May 2, 2015 by Editor

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Biggest Book Ever!

from Paste Magazine

Author Aims to Set New Guinness World Record with World’s Largest Published Novel

Author Aims to Set New Guinness World Record with World’s Largest Published Novel

Yahaya Baruwa, 27-year-old best-selling Canadian author, aims to do more than just release another commercial success, but also release the world’s largest published novel.

Struggles of a Dreamer: The Battle Between a Dreamer and Tradition will measure 8 ft. 5 in. high and 5 ft. 5 in. wide, resulting in an 11 ft. length when fully opened. The novel will be approximately 200 pages and bound in hardcover, rendered in full color. Due to its size, Struggles of a Dreamer will be crafted by hand, made from a combination of aluminum and tear-resistant paper, all sewn together with nylon stitching.

The novel seems to draw from the author’s own experiences of being a Nigerian immigrant, with characters Tunde, a beggar on the streets of New York City, and Toku’te, the son of a farmer in a faraway land, both testing the boundaries of tradition.

[ click to continue reading in Paste ]

Posted on May 1, 2015 by Editor

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¡Muchas Gracias, Mundos de Papel!

Posted on April 19, 2015 by Editor

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Günter Grass Gone

from The New Yorker

The Greatness of Günter Grass

BY 

CREDITPHOTOGRAPH BY RENE BURRI / MAGNUM

In 1982, when I was in Hamburg for the publication of the German translation of “Midnight’s Children,” I was asked by my publishers if I would like to meet Günter Grass. Well, obviously I wanted to, and so I was driven out to the village of Wewelsfleth, outside Hamburg, where Grass then lived. He had two houses in the village; he wrote and lived in one and used the other as an art studio. After a certain amount of early fencing—I was expected, as the younger writer, to make my genuflections, which, as it happened, I was happy to perform—he decided, all of a sudden, that I was acceptable, led me to a cabinet in which he stored his collection of antique glasses, and asked me to choose one. Then he got out a bottle of schnapps, and by the bottom of the bottle we were friends. At some later point, we lurched over to the art studio, and I was enchanted by the objects I saw there, all of which I recognized from the novels: bronze eels, terracotta flounders, dry-point etchings of a boy beating a tin drum. I envied him his artistic gift almost more than I admired him for his literary genius. How wonderful, at the end of a day’s writing, to walk down the street and become a different sort of artist! He designed his own book covers, too: dogs, rats, toads moved from his pen onto his dust jackets.

After that meeting, every German journalist I met wanted to ask me what I thought of him, and when I said that I believed him to be one of the two or three greatest living writers in the world some of these journalists looked disappointed, and said, “Well, ‘The Tin Drum,’ yes, but wasn’t that a long time ago?” To which I tried to reply that if Grass had never written that novel, his other books were enough to earn him the accolades I was giving him, and the fact that he had written “The Tin Drum” as well placed him among the immortals. The skeptical journalists looked disappointed. They would have preferred something cattier, but I had nothing catty to say.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on April 14, 2015 by Editor

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“Everyone was willing to let the writer hang, and I wasn’t.”

from NY1

One on 1 Profile: Editor/Publisher Nan Talese Continues Her Legacy in the World of Books

By Budd Mishkin

In any book, one of the most heartfelt thank yous from an author usually goes to the book editor, and for many years, some of the most prominent authors have thanked Nan Talese. NY1’s Budd Mishkin filed the following One on 1 profile.

Nan Talese was once dubbed the “high priestess of all New York editor/publishers.”

“People have said, ‘I’m so glad to meet you,'” she says. “Now, I cannot figure it out. (laughs).”

Talese: The hard thing is to write. What I do is easy.

Mishkin: Maybe it’s easy for you.

Talese: It’s easy for me.

Talese is held in such high regard that she has her own imprint, akin to her own department of the publishing giant Doubleday.

On the walls of her Midtown office hang pictures of some of the writers with whom she’s worked for decades, including best-selling authors Margaret Atwood and Pat Conroy.

At her Upper East Side home, there are notes from book projects both present and past.

“What I usually do is – I won’t do it because it’s undignified – I lie down here with my feet up here and I read the manuscripts,” Talese says. “I read very, very slowly. because I hear the words.”

Her appreciation for what writers endure is helped immensely by the fact that she lives with a writer, and a pretty fair one at that: her husband of more than 55 years, Gay Talese.

“As Gay writes his book, I read aloud the pages as they come out, and I think it puts me in the atmosphere of the writer’s working,” Nan Talese says. “I think it’s helped me a great deal.”

[ click to continue reading at NY1.com ]

Posted on March 3, 2015 by Editor

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Philip Levine Gone

from The New York Times

An Appraisal: The Poet Philip Levine, an Outsider Archiving the Forgotten

By 

Della and Tatum, Sweet Pea and Packy, Ida and Cal. You met a lot of unpretentious people in Philip Levine’s spare, ironic poems of the industrial heartland. Mr. Levine had toiled in auto plants as a young man. “I saw that the people that I was working with,” he told Detroit Magazine, “were voiceless in a way.”

Mr. Levine’s death is a serious blow for American poetry, in part because he so vividly evoked the drudgery and hardships of working-class life in America, and in part because this didn’t pull his poetry down into brackishness.

He was a shrewd and very funny man. I’m not sure another major American poet could give advice quite like the following, from a poem called “Facts,” collected in Mr. Levine’s classic 1991 book “What Work Is”:

If you take a ’37 Packard grill and split it down

the center and reduce the angle by 18° and reweld it,

you’ll have a perfect grill for a Rolls Royce

just in case you ever need a new grill for yours.

Mr. Levine was among those poets, and there are not enough of these, whose words you followed even outside their poetry. His interviews, for example, were feasts for the mind. To get back to Della and Tatum, Sweet Pea and Packy, and Ida and Cal for a moment, here is what he told The Paris Review in 1988 about the unpeopling of American poetry:

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on February 16, 2015 by Editor

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Thank You Philippines, Thank You National Book Store

Posted on February 6, 2015 by Editor

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Rod McKuen Gone

from The New York Times

Rod McKuen, Poet and Lyricist With Vast Following, Dies at 81

Rod McKuen, a ubiquitous poet, lyricist and songwriter whose work met with immense commercial success if little critical esteem, died on Thursday in Beverly Hills, Calif. He was 81.

Mr. McKuen, whom The St. James Encyclopedia of Popular Culture described as having been, at his height, “the unofficial poet laureate of America,” was the author of dozens of books of poetry, which together sold millions of copies.

For a generation of Americans at midcentury and afterward, Mr. McKuen’s poetry formed an enduring, solidly constructed bridge between the Beat generation and New Age sensibilities. Ranging over themes of love and loss, the natural world and spirituality, his work was prized by readers for its gentle accessibility while being condemned by many critics as facile, tepid and aphoristic.

Mr. McKuen’s output was as varied as it was vast, spanning song lyrics, including English-language adaptations (“Seasons in the Sun”) of works by his idol, Jacques Brel; music and lyrics, as for “Jean,” from the 1969 film “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie,” for which he received an Academy Award nomination; and musical scores, including that of the 1973 television film “Lisa, Bright and Dark.” He also appeared as a singer on television, on many recordings and in live performance.

“What McKuen guarantees is that a certain California sexual daydreaming can be yours for the asking even if you do move your lips rapidly as you read,” Louis Cox sniped in The New Republic in 1971.

[ click to read full obit at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on January 30, 2015 by Editor

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From James Frey to The Imitation Game

from Independent.ie

Television Review: A million little works of fiction

Illustration: Jim CoganIllustration: Jim Cogan

‘Based on a true story” ….”Inspired by actual events”…automatically these words on the opening credits lend an extra frisson to a film or a TV series. But to arrive at some understanding of this fiendishly tricky subject, we should probably start with a book, A Million Little Pieces, by James Frey.

It was a book about alcohol addiction which was offered to various publishers as a work of fiction, and rejected. It was eventually published as “non-fiction” and it sold millions, driven by an endorsement from Oprah – who then had to haul the author back to berate him like a bold boy for misleading her and the American people, when it emerged that several parts of the book were exaggerated or just invented.

Frey was in no position to argue, but I would argue on his behalf that he was to some extent the victim of an industry which had lost its confidence, which was dumbing down. That he had written a powerful novel, but that it needed this fake stamp of authenticity – “it all really happened, you know” – to get it on Oprah.

So I think there is more to this “based on a true story” racket than issues of artistic licence, and of where exactly you draw the line between fiction and non-fiction and all that. There is also at times an element of cynicism, of declaring that a story is true and then making it up anyway, a bit like the events recalled in Charlie when they were putting bogus stamps on the beef to Iraq.

Charlie itself was not motivated by any of that dark stuff, but the arguments that blew up around it are being replicated all over the free world – The Imitation Game, the biopic of the code-breaking genius Alan Turing, played by Benedict Cumberbatch, is accused of taking horrible liberties, of misrepresenting really important parts of Turing’s story, and of actually making the man more unloveable than he was.

[ click to continue reading at Independent.ie ]

Posted on January 27, 2015 by Editor

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Full Fathom Five’s Samantha Streger on YA Publishing

from Adventures in YA Publishing

Editor Samantha Streger of Full Fathom Five Digital

Today I have a very special guest to introduce. My editor, the lovely Samantha Streger! The best news? FFF Digital is open to submissions (including YA) Read below to find out more about Samantha and the company. 

Samantha Streger is the Publisher of Full Fathom Five Digital, where she has the badass job of publishing and promoting commercial books. Before joining FFF, she was Associate Editor in the teen & children’s department at Open Road Integrated Media, so ebooks are her forte. She also holds a publishing certificate from NYU and previously worked at Disney Publishing Worldwide and the Wallace Literary Agency. When she’s not reading and editing, Samantha can be found watching “Vampire Diaries” and re-runs of “The Office,” and trying to quit the gym.

1. How did you decide to become an editor?

I wanted to be an editor since the third grade. Of course, at the time, I thought being an editor was the same thing as being a copyeditor or proofreader, fixing typos and perfecting grammar! I was a stickler for mistakes. When I learned more about content editing, though, I found it even more interesting to give creative input. Even though I don’t have a large opportunity to edit these days, I keep taking on projects because of how much I enjoy being involved in the artistic process.

2. What are some of your favorite YA/children’s books?

Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine—the best Cinderella.  The Song of the Lioness quartet by Tamora Pierce is one of those series that forever changed me as a person. And I’m not ashamed to say that I love Harry Potter. (And I trusted Snape all along.)

3. What are some things NOT to do when submitting work?

Do not describe your book as containing “the marketability of Harry Potter with the mystery and intrigue of the Hunger Games.” Yes, that’s a real pitch letter I’ve received. Comparing your book to the most popular mainstream titles of the day digs a hole of expectation it’s almost impossible to crawl out of.

4. What title are you most proud of and how did you find the author? Besides myself of course! LOL

I am incredibly proud of my first acquisition for FFFDig: The Apartment Novels by Amanda Black (an adult romance series). I was a fan of Amanda’s stories when they were originally published online for free, and for years I’d dreamed of acquiring and publishing one of the amazingly talented fanfiction authors whose work I admired. I reached out to her on my first day at Full Fathom Five Digital; she had just begun the process of sending the manuscript out to agents. It was meant to be!

5. What is more important: character, plot, or world? 

Character. Particularly in YA / coming-of-age novels, there’s nothing better than the emotions evoked by a characters reactions and misperceptions. An incredible world and a strong plot is useless without characters to care about.

[ click to continue reading at Adventures in YA Publishing ]]

Posted on January 23, 2015 by Editor

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James Frey Visits Philippines

from G/ST

JAMES FREY VISITS PHL FOR A BOOK SIGNING TOUR

James Frey book signing

WHAT: James Frey book signing tour
WHEN: January 31 and February 1
WHERE: National Bookstore Cebu and Manila
ABOUT: facebook.com/pages/National-Book-Store

[ click to view at G/ST ]

Posted on January 19, 2015 by Editor

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Bullshit 451

from The LA Times

Bulldoze first, apologize later: a true L.A. landmark

by Christopher Hawthorne

The razing of Ray Bradbury’s home and a reprieve for Norms are the latest reminders of L.A.’s fuzzy historic preservation logicArchitect Thom Mayne, new owner of the late Ray Bradbury’s home, says he plans to build a wall on the property that will pay tribute to the writer. (Byron Espinoza)

It was beginning to feel like a demolition derby.

On Tuesday, word started to spread that the canary-yellow 1937 house in Cheviot Hills where the writer Ray Bradbury lived for more than 50 years was being knocked down.

The person razing it to make room for a new house on the site was the Pritzker Prize-winning architect Thom Mayne, whose firm Morphosis designed the Caltrans headquarters in downtown L.A. and a new campus for Emerson College in Hollywood, among other prominent buildings.

The next day, the preservation group Los Angeles Conservancy added an alert to its website that the new owner of the 1957 Norms restaurant on La Cienega Boulevard, a time capsule of the space-age L.A. coffee-shop style known as Googie, had been granted a demolition permit on Jan. 5.

By week’s end, Googie fans at least could breathe a sigh of relief. At a Thursday hearing on Norms at the Los Angeles Cultural Heritage Commission, an attorney for the owner said that there were “no current plans to demolish the property.” The commission voted to consider the building for cultural-monument status, protecting it for at least 75 days.

[ click to continue reading at LATimes.com ]

Posted on January 17, 2015 by Editor

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Glenn Horowitz Goes To Manhattan

from The New York Observer

Glenn Horowitz Bookseller to Open New Midtown Gallery With Photos of Giacometti

By 

Glenn Horowitz. (Jill Krementz)Glenn Horowitz photographed by Jill Krementz on January 11, 2015 in his Manhattan apartment on Central Park South.

This week, Glenn Horowitz Bookseller will open its new Manhattan gallery space Rare, along with the inaugural exhibition. Located on West 54th Street, across the street from MoMA’s sculpture garden, the 1,000-square-foot gallery will showcase first editions, manuscripts, letters, archival materials, fine art, and decorative arts spanning the 19th century to contemporary. Its first exhibition, titled “Matter/Giacometti,” opens this Thursday, January 15 (with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m.) and will examine Swiss designer and photographer Herbert Matter’s book of the same title.

The book is an intimate portrait of the (also) Swiss artist whose signature tall, thin, figurative sculptures (the results of years of experimentations with movements like abstraction and surrealism) have become famous worldwide. But Matter’s book is a highly personal project that took 25 years to create, published after his death in 1986 by his wife.

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Posted on January 13, 2015 by Editor

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“It’s definitely not a normal book.”

from New Canaan News

Novel experience: Hit the jackpot by tracking down clues in James Frey’s new book

Meg Barone

Bestselling author James Frey speaks about his new book, ìEndgame: The Calling,î to a hometown crowd at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Meg Barone / New Canaan NewsBestselling author James Frey speaks about his new book, ìEndgame: The Calling,î to a hometown crowd at the New Canaan Library. Photo: Meg Barone

Authors of the latest entry into the literary dystopian adventure take readers beyond the pages of their book and into a ground-breaking multi-platform reading experience and worldwide search for the key to a cash jackpot.

James Frey, a New Canaan resident and bestselling author of “A Million Little Pieces” and other works, partnered with Nils Johnson-Shelton to write “Endgame: The Calling,” the first of a trilogy, which was published in October.

During an informal presentation and casual conversation Wednesday with about 100 people at the New Canaan Library, Frey talked about his creative process, the inspiration for his latest books, and revealed that even he does not know the answer to its puzzles. The authors’ invite readers to follow the adventures of 12 teens as catastrophic events lead them on a global quest in search of three ancient keys that will save not only their bloodlines but the world. Readers must find the clues hidden within the stories to solve the puzzles.

The first person to find the key for the first book will win $500,000 in American eagle gold coins, currently held at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. The monetary worth of the prize increases with each book in the series to $1 million with the second novel and finally to $1.5 million with the third.

“It’s definitely not a normal book,” Frey said.

“It’s breaking from the rest of the pack and incorporating the reader,” said Shafer Jones, 15, of New Canaan, who sat in the front row with his family. Frey apologized to Jones and his family for his use of the “F” word in his remarks — and then continued to use it.

[ click to continue reading at New Canaan News ]

Posted on January 9, 2015 by Editor

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Memoir-Novels

from The New York Times

What Accounts for Our Current — or Recurrent — Fascination With Memoir-Novels?

Each week in Bookends, two writers take on questions about the world of books. This week, Leslie Jamison and Daniel Mendelsohn discuss our interest in narratives that blur the line between the real and the fabricated.

Leslie Jamison CreditIllustration by R. Kikuo JohnsonBy Leslie Jamison

Why do we like that space of uncertainty in which we don’t know what’s been invented and what hasn’t?

In May of 1856, a traveling panorama called “Arctic Regions!” arrived in Philadelphia, offering “a complete voyage from New York to the North Pole.” Posters bragged that it was “fresh from the hands” of a “great Master of American Artists” and could “transport us to the icy North,” promising a kind of paradox: that you could become aware of its artistic mastery by forgetting it was art at all.

This brings to mind a certain tension in how we read, as well, a dynamic David Shields has described in his relationship to autobiographical writing: “at once desperate for authenticity and in love with artifice.” There’s an electric charge in toggling back and forth between the shimmer of what’s been artfully constructed and the glint of what actually was. The reader is impressed by the panoramic architecture even as she forgets its presence.

This ambiguous territory has a more established place in poetry, a genre never filed into separate “fiction” and “nonfiction” areas on the shelves. But for narrative we’ve long been obsessed with partitioning the actual from the imagined, and the memoir-novel offers, finally, some relief from that Sisyphean taxonomy project. Shields describes the pleasure of “blurring (to the point of invisibility) . . . any distinction between fiction and nonfiction: the lure and blur of the real.”

So what’s the lure of the blur? Why do we like that space of uncertainty in which we don’t know what’s been invented and what hasn’t?

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on December 24, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME at New Canaan Library – January 7

from Hamlet Hub

James Frey Presents Endgame: The Calling at New Canaan Library

ENDGAME: THE CALLING by James Frey & Nils Johnson-Shelton is an engrossing novel at the core of a groundbreaking immersive, multi-platform reading experience. The ENDGAME trilogy follows twelve teens as catastrophic events lead them on a global quest in search of three ancient keys that will save not only their bloodlines but the world.

More than an apocalyptic adventure tale, each book in the series will feature an interactive puzzle comprised of clues that will lead to the location of a hidden key. The first eligible reader to solve the puzzle for the first book and find the key will win $500,000 worth of gold. Similar to the characters in the novels, readers will embark on their own hunt for a hidden key.

The subsequent two books in the Endgame series will have progressively larger payouts. For the lucky reader who is the first to solve the puzzle in the second installment, the prize is $1 dollars and a whopping $1.5 for the third book.

Join James Frey as part of the Authors on Stage on Wednesday January 7th, 2015 from 7:00 – 8:00pm in the Lamb Room.

[ click to read at HamletHub.com ]

Posted on December 22, 2014 by Editor

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Gift An e-Book This Holiday – People Love Books – FullFathomFive.com

And check out FullFathomFive.com for some great book ideas. Thanks.

Posted on December 21, 2014 by Editor

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Endgame : l’Appel de James Frey, interview Fnac

Posted on December 18, 2014 by Editor

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DOROTHY MUST DIE – Best Books of 2014

from KCUR Kansas City Public Media

Best Books Of 2014 For Children And Teens

By  & 

Books have the remarkable ability to enthrall, captivate and inspire. When kids are trapped indoors during the cold winter months books  can transport them into new and fascinating worlds.

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and three Johnson County librarians review their top picks in children’s literature.

The Best Children’s Books of 2014:

From Kate McNair, young adult librarian at the Johnson County Library: 

  • Dorothy Must Die by D.M. Paige (Grades 8-12): Amy Gumm, the other girl from Kansas, has been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked to stop Dorothy who has found a way to come back to Oz, seizing a power that has gone to her head — so now no one is safe!

Up to Date Intern Eliza Spertus reads from “Dorothy Must Die” – CLICK TO LISTEN

[ click for all KCUR’s 2014 Best Book Picks ]

Posted on December 14, 2014 by Editor

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Gimme Books’ Star-studded Pop-up

from RACKED NY

Upcoming New York City Events with Zady, Coop & Spree, More!

by Rebecca Jennings

LOWER EAST SIDE—All weekend long, Gimme Books will host a literary star-studded pop up at 2 Rivington Street, where they’ll be appearances by authors Amy Sedaris, Meg Wolitzer, Emma Straub, James Frey, Laura Day, and the editors of Cherry Bombe. Meanwhile, peruse literary agents’ favorite books, Garance Doré-designed stationary, and t-shirts and bags by Prinkshop.

[ click to read more at ny.RACKED.com ]

Posted on December 12, 2014 by Editor

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Frey Rewrite

from The London Free Press

James Frey rewrites his story with ‘Endgame’ trilogy

By Mark Daniell, QMI Agency

When it comes to career reinventions, author James Frey is in a league of his own.

His latest project, Endgame, is a sci-fi series and a real-life puzzle. The prize? $500,000 in gold. It’s in a locked case that’s on display at Caesar’s Palace in Las Vegas. All you have to do is find the place on Earth where the key that will unlock the gold is located.

But first, a little history.

After his famous dustup with Oprah Winfrey following the news that he’d fabricated parts of his 2003 memoir, A Million Little Pieces, and its follow-up, My Friend Leonard, Frey became a pariah in the publishing industry.

He wasn’t fazed.

The writer bounced back with his Los Angeles-set Bright Shiny Morning in 2008. He followed that with his best-selling series of young-adult science-fiction books, The Lorien Legacies.

Frey also found time to reimagine the life of Jesus Christ in his 2011 “fiction” book, The Final Testament of the Holy Bible.

“I don’t ever want to have a career that you can pin down,” Frey says animatedly in a mid-afternoon interview at the head office of his Canadian publisher. “I always admired (the director) Stanley Kubrick because he never did the same thing twice. If you look at his films, they’re completely different from each other. It was just him, doing whatever he wanted. I always thought that was the way to do it, so that’s what I’ve tried to do.”

[ click to continue reading at The London Free Press ]

Posted on December 10, 2014 by Editor

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Mysterious Galaxy Moves

from the Mysterious Galaxy website

Mysterious Galaxy San Diego

MG Store FrontAbove photo is classic CMB Mysterious Galaxy

Effective December 6, 2014, our new address will be …
5943 Balboa Avenue, Suite #100, San Diego, CA 92111
________________________________________________________________
In May 2013, Mysterious Galaxy San Diego celebrated twenty years in business as an independent specialty genre bookstore. Our tagline, “Books of Martians, Murder, Magic and Mayhem,” encompasses the genres for which we are widely known: science fiction, mystery, fantasy and horror. In recent years, we have expanded our galaxy’s borders by participating in community events, creating events of interest to our customers, and partnering with local non-profit organizations.

Mysterious Galaxy has an active young adult program, providing authors to visit, read, and teach at schools that partner with us. Our MG Junior section reflects this program and our passion for young adult literature … which we all enjoy. Our staff is composed of passionate and knowledgeable booksellers, and we share our enthusiasm for our genres through hand-selling, great customer service, and regular reviews in our print and electronic newsletters, as well as here on our website.

We are dedicated to providing readers and book collectors with a great selection of books, many of them signed first editions. Signed first editions are a byproduct of the author events in our store and books acquired at conventions or directly from publishers and authors.

The owners of Mysterious Galaxy are Terry Gilman, Maryelizabeth Hart, and Jeff Mariotte. They met and began talking about Mysterious Galaxy in late 1992 when they recognized a need for a genre store in San Diego and saw it as a way to share their passion for books, bookselling, and a love of reading with their community. Mysterious Galaxy opened to much fanfare on May 8, 1993. Among the authors who celebrated the opening of the store with hundreds of fans were Ray Bradbury, David Brin, and Robert Crais.

[ click to for directions and to read more at MystGalaxy.com ]

Posted on December 9, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME – James Frey || Reseña sin Spoilers

Muchas gracias, Ian Mellark

Posted on December 7, 2014 by Editor

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ENDGAME Worldwide

Posted on December 5, 2014 by Editor

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Safe Reads: ENDGAME

from Safe Reads

[ click to view at Safe Reads ]

Posted on December 3, 2014 by Editor

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Rearguard Action For God

from NewStatesman

The books of revelations: why are novelists turning back to religion?

There is a sense that, in recent years, novelists have formed part of a rearguard action in response to Richard Dawkins’s New Atheist consensus. Philip Maughan talks to Marilynne Robinson, Francis Spufford and Rowan Williams about God in literature.

by Philip Maughan

In the half light: biblical narratives, religious ritual and Christian art have a renewed appeal for baffled unbelievers

Close to the end of White Noise, Don DeLillo’s 1984 novel about a professor of Hitler studies who will do just about anything to ease his fear of dying, an elderly nun reveals the secret truth about faith. “Do you think we are stupid?” she asks Jack Gladney, bleeding from the wrist at a Catholic hospital following a botched murder attempt. “We are here to take care of sick and injured,” the old nun explains in a halting German accent. “Only this. You would talk about heaven, you must find another place.”

All the crosses, devotional images of saints, angels and popes that line the walls of the ward exist merely as set dressing. “The devil, the angels, heaven and hell. If we did not pretend to believe these things, the world would collapse,” she says. “As belief shrinks from the world, people find it more necessary than ever that someone believe. Wild-eyed men in caves. Nuns in black. Monks who do not speak.”

“I don’t want to hear this,” Gladney moans. “This is terrible.”

“But true,” the nun says.

Perhaps this goes some way to explaining the unlikely popularity of religion in contemporary fiction. So far this year we have seen the strange sanctification of a thalidomide victim who died in childhood (Orla Nor Cleary in Nicola Barker’s dazzlingly manic In the Approaches), an avowedly atheist dentist lured to Israel by the leader of an underground sect (Joshua Ferris’s Man Booker-shortlisted To Rise Again at a Decent Hour), a high court judge, Fiona Maye, ruling on whether a hospital has the right to administer a life-saving blood transfusion to a teenage Jehovah’s Witness (Ian McEwan’s The Children Act) and, most recently, the voyage of a prim evangelical on a mission to outer space (Michel Faber’s Book of Strange New Things).

When you consider these alongside the large volume of books about Jesus published in the past few years – Colm Tóibín’s gory reimagining of the Gospels in The Testament of Mary, the enigmatic youth David from J M Coetzee’s The Childhood of Jesus, James Frey’s damaged Ben Zion in The Final Testament and Philip Pullman’s warring twins in The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ – you get a sense of bewildered fascination, of a sore that continues to itch.

[ click to read full article at NewStatesman ]

Posted on November 27, 2014 by Editor

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Frey On Kobo

from Kobo.com

The Many Sides of Endgame

5 Questions with author James Frey


James Frey (left) and Nils Johnson-Shelton

It all started with a simple goal: create an “experience.” After all is said and done however Endgame, the much anticipated new YA series by James Frey and Nils Johnson-Shelton, may be the most ambitious multimedia experiment ever attempted in publishing.

Based around the story of a global game between 12 ancient cultures that will decide the fate of humankind, Endgame holds an elaborate code—one that will direct readers towards a key hidden somewhere in the real world. That key will open a case containing $500,000 in gold.

To enhance the hunt, Google’s Niantic Labs has made an alternate reality game based on the plot. Two more books are coming. Fox is developing a movie concurrently, and around it all is a scavenger hunt base on cryptic numbers, coordinates, and other details hidden in the book.

We caught up with the one half of the writing team, James Frey, an author best known for his 2003 smash hit A Million Little Pieces (and subsequent), to talk about the multifaceted new project.

What prompted you to branch out from writing for adults to YA?

Basically I branched into YA because I have a short attention span and I was kind of bored. I wanted to get away from the preciousness of the literary world and do more collaborative work, and also make stories for a different audience. I also really enjoy genre fiction in general and YA in particular, so I thought, “Why not?” I’m glad I’ve done it. It’s been a ton of fun and a real education and at times humbling. Endgame specifically has allowed me to do all kinds of things that I never would have the opportunity to do if I stuck with literary books—I mean, would I ever get to pitch Google the idea of making a mobile video game for Bright Shiny Morning or The Final Testament of the Holy Bible? No, I would not.

What were some of the challenges of writing for the genre? 

A main challenge for Endgame has been getting everything to work together in the way I want it to. Not just the story but the puzzle, the legal aspects of the prize, the collaboration with Niantic and the Alternate Reality Game, coordination with Fox and Temple Hill, getting Caesars to sign up for displaying the gold at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, the marketing, the promotion, the social media—all of it. As for the storytelling, my main challenge has been figuring out how to work with other writers. Working with Nils (my Endgame co-author) has been great, but there are still hiccups along the way. And I imagine there will be more as the Endgame world expands and gets bigger and bigger—but in the end these are all great problems to have.

[ click to continue reading at Kobo.com ]

Posted on November 26, 2014 by Editor

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