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Another Pilfered Picasso

from AFP via Yahoo! News

Stolen Picasso unearthed by ‘Indiana Jones of art’

Courtesy of ARTCOPS.COM

The Hague (AFP) – A Dutch art detective dubbed the “Indiana Jones of the Art World” has struck again, finding a Picasso painting worth 25 million euros stolen from a Saudi sheikh’s yacht on the French Riviera in 1999.

Arthur Brand said he had handed back the 1938 masterpiece entitled “Portrait of Dora Maar”, also known as “Buste de Femme (Dora Maar)” to an insurance company earlier this month.

The discovery of the rare portrait of Maar, one of Pablo Picasso’s most influential mistresses, is the culmination of a four-year investigation into the burglary on the luxury yacht Coral Island, as she lay anchored in Antibes.

Two decades after its theft and with no clues to its whereabouts, the French police were stumped — and the portrait, which once hung in the Spanish master’s home until his death in 1973, was feared lost forever.

But after a four-year trail which led through the Dutch criminal underworld, two intermediaries turned up on Brand’s Amsterdam doorstep 10 days ago with the missing picture.

“They had the Picasso, now valued at 25 million euros wrapped in a sheet and black rubbish bags with them,” Brand told AFP.

It was yet another success for Brand, who hit the headlines last year for returning a stolen 1,600-year-old mosaic to Cyprus.

[ click to continue reading at Yahoo! News ]

Posted on April 19, 2019 by Editor

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ABBC / CBBS / NBBC

from Vox

How long before big media companies become big sports-gambling companies?

Sooner than you think. But AT&T, which owns HBO, TNT, and CNN, says they won’t be taking your bets.

By Peter Kafka

As sports betting becomes legal in more states, big companies are becoming interested in getting a piece of the action. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Sports betting in the US used to be illegal, for the most part. Now it’s up to individual states to decide if they want it. Besides Nevada, which has always had legal sports betting, a handful of states have authorized it, with only New Jersey jumping in completely. But with estimates of US sports gambling hovering around $150 billion annually, it won’t be long before many states decide they want a piece of that action. 

So here’s the question for media companies that are hoping to profit in some way from the billions of dollars gamblers are going to bet on sports: How do we get a slice?

I’ve been talking to people who make money in sports betting and media, and this looks like the way it’s going to play out:

[ click to continue reading at Vox ]

Posted on April 18, 2019 by Editor

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Delphi Discovered

from National Geographic

Once sacred, the Oracle at Delphi was lost for a millennium. See how it was found.

Relying on clues from the past, a team of 19th-century archaeologists uncovered Delphi, the site where ancient Greeks asked questions, and Apollo answered them.

BY MARÍA TERESA MAGADÁN

Greek myth holds that the thunder god Zeus once dispatched two eagles flying in opposite directions across the sky. Where their paths crossed would be the center of the world. Legend says that the birds met over Delphi, seated on the slopes of Parnassós. Zeus marked the spot with a stone called the omphalos (navel), to signify the location’s centrality.

According to another myth, this impressive spot in central Greece (about 100 miles northwest of Athens) was originally sacred to Gaea, mother goddess of the earth, who placed her son Python, a serpent, as a guard for Delphi and its oracle. Apollo, god of light and music, slew the serpent and took over the site for himself. Priestesses who served Apollo there were called the “Pythia,” named in honor of Gaea’s vanquished son. Throughout the classical world spread the belief that these priestesses channeled prophecies from Apollo himself. (Read about the science behind the Delphic Oracle’s prophetic powers.)

The cult of Apollo seems to have been functioning in Delphi as early as the eighth century B.C. About two centuries later, leaders from all over Greece were consulting the oracle on major issues of the day: waging war, founding colonies, and religious rituals. Since it was a place used by different—and often rival—Greek states, Delphi soon became not only a sacred space but also a place where a city-state could exhibit its status to the wider Greek world.

[ click to continue reading at Nat Geo ]

Posted on April 17, 2019 by Editor

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Mark Millar’s ‘Space Bandits’

from Deadline

Netflix And Image Comics: Mark Millar’s ‘Space Bandits’ Brings Howard Chaykin Aboard

By Geoff Boucher

Image Comics

EXCLUSIVE: Netflix and Mark Millar announce their latest in-house creation, Space Bandits, a female-led sci-fi story, described by Millar as “a female Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid set in space with a massive and exciting cast of characters.” Image Comics, publisher of The Walking Dead, Happy! and Saga, will handle the tie-in comic book iteration of the Netflix property and artist Matteo Scalera will illustrate the space-faring adventures on the page.

Thena Khole and Cody Blue are outlaw queens who lead notorious heist gangs that hop from starship to starship taking whatever they want whenever they want it. But when both Khole and Blue are betrayed by mutineers in their own crews, the two bandits are united in their thirst for revenge.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline ]

Posted on April 16, 2019 by Editor

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A tragedy so terrible, it’s best just to laugh.

Posted on April 15, 2019 by Editor

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Liquid Solid Found

from National Geographic

Confirmed: New phase of matter is solid and liquid at the same time

The mind-bending material would be like a sponge made of water that’s leaking water.

BY ADAM MANN

SOLID, LIQUID, GAS … and something else? While most of us learn about just three states of matter in elementary school, physicists have discovered several exotic varieties that can exist under extreme temperature and pressure conditions.

Now, a team has used a type of artificial intelligence to confirm the existence of a bizarre new state of matter, one in which potassium atoms exhibit properties of both a solid and a liquid at the same time. If you were somehow able to pull out a chunk of such material, it would probably look like a solid block leaking molten potassium that eventually all dissolved away.

“It would be like holding a sponge filled with water that starts dripping out, except the sponge is also made of water,” says study coauthor Andreas Hermann, a condensed matter physicist at the University of Edinburgh whose team describes the work this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.

[ click to continue reading at Nat Geo ]

Posted on April 14, 2019 by Editor

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Flash You Were Here

Posted on April 13, 2019 by Editor

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Sex Pot

from Metro UK

People are putting cannabis up their bums and vaginas to have better sex

by Jasper Hamill

This packet contains a cannabis suppositry (Image: Foria)

Here in the UK, most cannabis users eat, smoke or vaporize weed to get high.

But in US states where it’s now legal, a very different method of using weed is emerging.

Marijuana is slowly shedding its image as a drug used by munchy-crazed potheads and becoming a medicine for people suffering from chronic pain and even a ‘wellness’ product believed to enhance healthy living.

In California though, people are using placing cannabis-based products inside their bums and vaginas to enhance sex or tackle soreness caused by medical conditions.

We spoke to a company called Foria which makes the world’s first cannabis suppository, as well as a woman who has used weed to help overcome a history of sexual trauma and discover the joy of sex and sensuality.

[ click to continue reading at Metro ]

Posted on April 12, 2019 by Editor

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Welcome Back, Carter

from The Hollywood Reporter

Graydon Carter: Life After Vanity Fair and Embracing the Future (Guest Column)

Graydon Carter

E. Charbonneau/WireImage
Graydon Carter (right) with Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes at the 2007 Vanity Fair Oscar party at Morton’s.

Sure, the perks, pleasures and expense accounts of a vanishing print business have been replaced by digital churns and dubious Facebook ads, but the legendary magazine editor — who turned down an offer to run Time — retains his zest for journalism with a new newsletter and an occasional trip to the neighborhood newsstand.

New York was always a magazine city for me. And in some ways it still is. I grew up in Canada, and magazines — Life, Esquire, Time — more than anything else, told me the story of this city, its industry, its might and the people who made it the center of just about everything I was interested in. When I finally made it to New York in the ’70s, the magazine influence was still potent. Time Inc. had its own building. So did Condé Nast and Hearst. Even Newsweek and Forbes did.

There was a huge billboard in the main room of Grand Central, and from time to time one of the newsweeklies booked it. When I would take the train to visit friends up in Westchester County, the platforms were lined with smaller billboards for Time and Newsweek and magazines I’d never heard of, such as Grit (an agricultural supplement that was included in the weekend section of small-town newspapers). My guess was that those billboards were intended to catch the eye of advertising-agency account executives for such brands as Chesterfield cigarettes and J&B scotch as they headed home to bedroom towns like Salem and Bedford.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on April 11, 2019 by Editor

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Armageddon Map

from France 24

Mapping Armaggedon: Earth’s looming tsunamis and mega-quakes

A landslide from Anak Karkatau triggered a tsunami that killed 437 people and injured 30,000 in December 2018A landslide from Anak Karkatau triggered a tsunami that killed 437 people and injured 30,000 in December 2018 AFP/File

As villagers along the Sunda Strait were finishing their meals on the evening of 22 December last year, they had no idea of the cataclysmic event that awaited them.

After bubbling on and off for months, the active volcano of Anak Krakatoa erupted, triggering a 0.3-kilometre-cubed sized chunk of rock to plunge into the unusually deep waters off the coast of Indonesia’s west Java and South Sumatra regions.

The resulting tsunami, which hit the coast just minutes after the landslide, killed 437 people and injured 30,000 more.

The killer wave was the most recent of a geological phenomenon that has led to around a quarter of a million deaths in the last two decades alone.

And it won’t be the last.

[ click to continue reading at France 24 ]

Posted on April 10, 2019 by Editor

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Miles Millar & Alfred Gough in conversation w/ James Frey

Posted on April 9, 2019 by Editor

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Baseball Is Dead. (Yeah, right!)

from The Guardian

Why baseball spent more than $1bn on three players in a month

Three of the richest contracts in sports history would appear to bust the baseball-is-dying narrative, but underlying trends have exposed a rot within the mechanics of the sport’s economics

Posted on April 8, 2019 by Editor

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Spooky Golightly

from The New York Post

Hollywood legend Audrey Hepburn was a WWII resistance spy

By Reed Tucker

She was one of Hollywood’s most celebrated actresses. But Audrey Hepburn had a role that few knew about: spy.

And unlike the characters that she portrayed on screen, playing this part could literally mean life or death.

The maddeningly private actress, who died in 1993, had dropped hints about her work with the Dutch Resistance during World War II, and now a new book puts the whole story together, providing an in-depth look at her life during the conflict.

Robert Matzen, author of “Dutch Girl: Audrey Hepburn and World War II” (GoodKnight Books), combed secret files, talked to Hepburn’s family and tracked down diaries to uncover new information.

The biggest surprise to many will be Hepburn’s work with the Dutch Resistance against Nazi occupation. She certainly seemed an unlikely hero.

[ click to continue reading at NYP ]

Posted on April 7, 2019 by Editor

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Plague Again

from MSN

Deadly germs, Lost cures: A Mysterious Infection, Spanning the Globe in a Climate of Secrecy

by MATT RICHTEL and ANDREW JACOBS

Last May, an elderly man was admitted to the Brooklyn branch of Mount Sinai Hospital for abdominal surgery. A blood test revealed that he was infected with a newly discovered germ as deadly as it was mysterious.

Doctors swiftly isolated him in the intensive care unit. The germ, a fungus called Candida auris, preys on people with weakened immune systems, and it is quietly spreading across the globe.

Over the last five years, it has hit a neonatal unit in Venezuela, swept through a hospital in Spain, forced a prestigious British medical center to shut down its intensive care unit, and taken root in India, Pakistan and South Africa .

Recently C. auris reached New York , New Jersey and Illinois, leading the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to add it to a list of germs deemed “urgent threats.”

The man at Mount Sinai died after 90 days in the hospital, but C. auris did not. Tests showed it was everywhere in his room, so invasive that the hospital needed special cleaning equipment and had to rip out some of the ceiling and floor tiles to eradicate it.

“Everything was positive — the walls, the bed, the doors, the curtains, the phones, the sink, the whiteboard, the poles, the pump,” said Dr. Scott Lorin, the hospital’s president. “The mattress, the bed rails, the canister holes, the window shades, the ceiling, everything in the room was positive.”

[ click to continue reading at MSN ]

Posted on April 6, 2019 by Editor

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Megalopolis

from Deadline

Francis Ford Coppola Ready To Make ‘Megalopolis’ And Is Eyeing Cast

By Mike Fleming Jr

EXCLUSIVE: On the eve of his 80th birthday, Francis Ford Coppola is ready to embark on one of his dream projects. He plans to direct Megalopolis, a sprawling film as ambitious as Apocalypse Now, that he has been plotting for many years. Coppola revealed this to me today. He has his script, and he has begun speaking informally to potential stars. I’ve heard Jude Law’s name among those who might potentially be in the movie. I have much to report about Coppola’s dream project, and I got to view some of the second unit footage he shot after announcing the project in Cannes, before the terror attacks of 9/11 — the film is set in New York and is an architect’s attempt to create a utopia in the city, combated by the mayor — ground progress on the film to a halt.

“So yes, I plan this year to begin my longstanding ambition to make a major work utilizing all I have learned during my long career, beginning at age 16 doing theater, and that will be an epic on a grand scale, which I’ve titled Megalopolis,” Coppola told me today. “It is unusual; it will be a production on a grand scale with a large cast. It makes use of all of my years of trying films in different styles and types culminating in what I think is my own voice and aspiration. It is not within the mainstream of what is produced now, but I am intending and wishing and in fact encouraged, to begin production this year.”

This comes after Coppola has locked Apocalypse Now: Final Cut, a version of the film that most pleases the storied director, and which will premiere at the upcoming Tribeca Film Festival.

“By having a record of all old cuts on Betamax, I was able to see what steps had been made toward the final version released,” he said. “Interesting, even though I’ve had ‘final cut’ since Godfather‘s success, I always tried to be reasonable about ideas or suggestions made by the ‘finance’ partners, distributors or studios. However, their unanimous comment of ‘too long’ often led to trimming things out, whereas in retrospect the solution can often be to put more in. Also changes often beget other changes and you don’t quite realize then the road you are following.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline ]

Posted on April 5, 2019 by Editor

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XFL Ain’t No AFL – No Worries.

from Inside Hook

To Avoid AAF’s Fate, XFL Must Have a Better TV Deal

Vince McMahon has promised fans will be able to find XFL games “consistently.”

BY EVAN BLEIER

The Alliance of American Football, which suspended all football operations yesterday with two games remaining, began its season with games airing on CBS.

The debut was strong and many had hoped the relatively strong TV ratings meant the league would last, but inconsistency in where the AAF could be found on the dial  – be it CBS Sports Network, TNT or NFL Network – following its first few weeks at least partially led to its downfall.

That’s something the XFL – which is set to kick off in 2020 – is hoping to avoid.

In a statement following the AAF’s closure, XFL founder Vince McMahon said the XFL is “well-funded” and that “the success or failure of other leagues will have no impact on our ability to deliver high-quality, fast-paced, professional football.”

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on April 4, 2019 by Editor

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Consent Condom

from The Sun

New ‘consent’ condoms can only be opened by two people

The condoms can only be opened when four hands simultaneously press special pressure points on the side of the packet

By Molly Rose Pike

A BIZARRE new pack of condoms that can only be opened by two people at once have been launched to promote consent.

‘Consent Pack’ condoms open only when four hands simultaneously press special pressure points on the side of the packet, it’s claimed.

Argentinian contraceptive firm Tulipan say the product will make consent during sex clearer, though it’s not clear how effective this will be.

The company plans to give the condoms away for free in bars and at events in the Argentinian capital city of Buenos Aires.

Joaquin Campins, the general director of the BBDO agency, which cooperated with the condom brand on the special pack, said: “If it’s not a yes, it’s a no.

[ click to continue reading at The Sun ]

Posted on April 3, 2019 by Editor

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The Simulation Hypothesis

from Digital Trends

Are we living in a simulation? This MIT scientist says it’s more likely than not

by Dyllan Furness

we spoke to an mit computer scientists about the simulation hypothesis medrez riz play labs august 2017 phan 05Rizwan Virk, Play Labs’ Executive Director

What if I told you that physical reality is an illusion and we all live in a computer simulation?

That hypothesis, famously probed in the 1999 film The Matrix, is the subject of a new book by Rizwan Virk, a computer scientist and video game developer who leads Play Labs at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In his book, The Simulation Hypothesis, Virk endeavors to unpack the heady arguments that call our physical world into question.

[ click to continue reading at Digital Trends ]

Posted on April 2, 2019 by Editor

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HEATHERS

from The New Yorker

“Heathers” Blew Up the High-School Comedy

The 1989 cult classic ushered in a darker, weirder, more experimental era for teen movies.

Text by Naomi Fry

“Touchstones” is an ongoing interactive series in which New Yorker writers guide us through the works that shaped them as critics and as people.

In the course of the eighties, nothing formed my understanding of what it meant to be a teen-ager, and particularly an American teen-ager, more than the movies of John Hughes. I was an Israeli kid who occasionally, thanks to my dad’s job, spent time in the United States, and Hughes’s œuvre—especially “The Breakfast Club,” “Pretty in Pink,” and “Sixteen Candles”—served, for me, as both an anthropological document and a how-to guide. For American teen-agers, I learned, daily life was a battleground: their parents pushed them around or ignored them; their teachers were bored and boring; they were confused about sex, and even more so about love; race was rarely a problem (the American teen-ager was almost always white), but class, and especially money, was; and class and money translated into the chief issue seemingly dogging every American teen-ager’s life—high-school cliques, and one’s ability to break free of their constraints in order to discover who one really was.

No matter how difficult these issues were to deal with, however, teens were able to overcome them by the end of Hughes’s movies. No problem was unmanageable, no adversity insurmountable. The movies’ redemptive arc guaranteed that the burnout and the prom queen could set their conflicts aside—as could the rich guy and the poor girl, and the jock and the weirdo—and the result was a new, more perfect union, which was more often than not sealed with a kiss.

The Hughesian Ending

“Make a wish,” Jake tells Samantha in the last scene of “Sixteen Candles.” “It already came true,” she replies.

The constancy of this teen-movie template was likely why “Heathers”—directed by Michael Lehmann, written by Daniel Waters, and the feature-film début for both—came as such a shock. Though the movie was released in the States in 1989—where it was, for the most part, a critical hit, though a box-office flop—it had not come out in Israel, and I saw it only in 1990, which I spent in Seattle. That year, I had fashioned myself as a sophisticated outsider, and had begun going to see movies alone, as sophisticated outsiders tend to do. (Making friends was a little bit of a struggle.) And so I settled down alone in a cinematheque-style theatre to watch what I believed would be another Hughes-style comedy. “Heathers,” I imagined, would focus on two attractive young people, played by Winona Ryder and Christian Slater, who would, against the odds, fall in love, come to resist the cliquishness of their school—embodied by a trio of popular mean girls, all named Heather—and bring on an improved, quasi-utopian social order.

But about twenty-five minutes into the movie I experienced a strong cognitive dissonance: I watched as J.D. (Slater) and Veronica (Ryder) gave Heather Chandler, the cruellest, most powerful member of the Heathers, a poisonous concoction. Had they just killed her? A teen movie couldn’t include murders, could it?

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on April 1, 2019 by Editor

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Float like a… ummm… and, uh, sting like a…

Posted on March 24, 2019 by Editor

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55,000 Hours Of Boxing Archives

from The New York Times

For Sale: This Massive, Obsessive and (Probably) Obsolete VHS Boxing Archive

Forty years of boxing matches — as many as 55,000 individual fights — have been painstakingly preserved in a video archive. In the age of YouTube and cloud storage, is it worth anything?

By Alex Vadukul

Rock’ Em Sock’ Em Robots.CreditVincent Tullo for The New York Times

There’s a small apartment on 137th Street in Hamilton Heights that contains one of the most peculiar videotape collections in New York. The dusty VHS archive fills a vast library that contains the analog history of a sport: 8,000 cassettes with recordings of over 55,000 boxing matches that span 40 years.

It was the life’s work of Bela Szilagyi, a classical pianist and passionate fight enthusiast, who started the collection in 1979 when he taped a featherweight title match on a Quasar videocassette recorder. Mr. Szilagyi died in 2012 at 78 years old and his wife, a soft-spoken piano teacher, became the collection’s archivist.

On a recent Sunday night, Elizabeth Szilagyi, 76, commenced her ritual in the living room. She poured herself a glass of red wine, put on her reading glasses, and sat in front of her TV with a notepad in hand to record a welterweight fight at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. She ate a salad while taking notes about the match for the information card that gets filed in the archive. The bell rang and the boxers marched toward each other.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on March 23, 2019 by Editor

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I Still Believe

from The Philadelphia Inquirer

The UFO community still believes — and science is starting to listen

by Chabeli Herrera

The UFO community still believes — and science is starting to listenRICH POPE / MCT

ORLANDO, Fla. — He appeared as if a hologram at first — then solid — suddenly there and clear as you or I, at the edge of the forest behind Trish Bishop’s home in Kissimmee.

It was a Thursday in March 2013, the glow of the afternoon tucking in for the day behind the trees. He stood tall, at least 6-foot-3, perhaps 220 pounds and certainly muscular, wearing a formfitting tan colored uniform, boots, and gloves. He lingered by the crape myrtle tree in the middle of the backyard.

When he turned around, it was his face, she remembers, that stopped her.

Bulging eyes jutting so far out of the sockets that Bishop wondered whether he could close them. Skin white as chalk. And a jaw so large, it dispelled any notions the government worker had of the visitor being human.

[ click to continue reading at Philly.com ]

Posted on March 21, 2019 by Editor

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Eternal Sunshine at 15

from Vanity Fair

Mind Games and Broken Hearts: Jim Carrey and Michel Gondry on Making Eternal Sunshine

Fifteen years later, the star and director get candid about Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind’s grueling production, why they almost got into a fistfight on set, and the Tracy Morgan-starring scenes that didn’t make the final cut.

by YOHANA DESTA

Winslet and Carrey in *Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.*From Snap Stills/REX/Shutterstock.

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless MindMichel Gondry’s instant classic of a sci-fi romance, written by Charlie Kaufman, which debuted 15 years ago—originally had a much darker ending. The Oscar-winning film follows ex-couple Joel and Clementine (Jim Carrey and Kate Winslet) as they undergo procedures to erase one another from their respective memories, with much of the story taking place in Joel’s subconscious. By the end of the film, they’re drawn together again anyway, willfully ignoring the fact that their relationship may very well crash and burn once more.

That’s not how Kaufman wrote it, though. “We don’t end up together in Charlie’s version. I walk away,” Carrey said in a recent phone interview. Gondry—who was sitting next to Carrey—added that the screenwriter also considered flipping the narrative, revealing at the end that the story has been taking place in Clementine’s head the whole time. But both ideas were ultimately scrapped—and Gondry’s relatively happy ending won out instead. (Kaufman’s rep didn’t respond when we asked to comment on this story.)

With its homespun sci-fi aesthetic, aided by Gondry’s nifty, lo-fi special effects and lived-in romanticism, Eternal Sunshine was a quietly mind-blowing film, the kind that spawned plenty of thin imitators. But it took a lot of tweaking for the film to arrive where it did—which also meant that several scenes featuring notable bit players were left on the cutting-room floor. A post-S.N.L., pre-30 Rock Tracy Morgan, for example, played Joel’s neighbor in a few flashbacks that did not make the finished film. “He’s a comedic genius,” said Gondry—“Genius!” Carrey emphasized. But “the reality is he was Tracy Morgan”—which made his presence a bit of a distraction. (Morgan’s rep says the comedian doesn’t remember if he acted in the film.)

[ click to continue reading at VF ]

Posted on March 19, 2019 by Editor

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Taco Bell Hot Sauce To The Rescue Again!

from The Takeout

Taco Bell hot sauce saves another life

by Gwen Ihnat

A few weeks ago, we were shocked to hear that a man survived for five days stranded in the snow by eating nothing but Taco Bell hot sauce packets (resulting in his getting Taco Bell free for a year). This started us on the path to thinking that Taco Bell hot sauce was magical. And now, in light of another hot-sauce life-saving measure, we think we may be on to something.

In—happy Monday, everyone—Florida, a man was sitting down at a Taco Bell in Winter Haven when he decided to get up from his seat to procure more hot sauce. Mere seconds later, an elderly man crashed through the front of that Taco Bell with his car, hitting the table where the hot-sauce-retrieving customer had been sitting just moments before.

[ click to continue reading at The Takeout ]

Posted on March 18, 2019 by Editor

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Yoga With Hunnam and Hurst

from Pop Culture

‘Sons of Anarchy’ Co-Stars Charlie Hunnam and Ryan Hurst to Lead Yoga Class

By DANIEL S. LEVINE

Sons of Anarchy co-stars Charlie Hunnam and Ryan Hurst agreed to host a yoga class for fans, but only for one day this May.

The event, appropriately titled “Yogis of Anarchy,” will be part of Motor City Comic Con at the Suburban Collection Showplace in Novi, Michigan. The convention runs from May 17-19, with the yoga class held on the final day from 8:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. It is only open to convention attendees and only limited spaces are available.

Hunnam and Hurst built an off-screen bond while they worked together on FX’s Sons of Anarchy from 2008 to 2012. They reunited on Sam Taylor-Johnson’s A Million Little Pieces, which was shown at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.

In a new Hollywood Reporter interview, Hunnam said they frequently practice yoga together and are still close friends.

[ click to continue reading at Pop Culture ]

Posted on March 17, 2019 by Editor

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Old Order New Monday

Posted on March 15, 2019 by Editor

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Whale Fall

from The New Yorker

A Whale’s Afterlife

On the day before Thanksgiving, 2011, Greg Rouse, a trim marine biologist in his fifties, was tidying his lab at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, in La Jolla, California. Rouse studies the worms and other small animals that inhabit the deep sea. He was organizing his microscopes, dissection supplies, and jars of deep-sea critters when he received a long-anticipated e-mail.

In the late two-thousands, Rouse and Eddie Kisfaludy, then an operations manager for Virgin Oceanic, had begun meeting with officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (noaa) and the city of San Diego to pitch an alternative approach to the disposal of dead whales. Often, whales that wash up on shore are hauled to landfills or pushed back into the water. Rouse and Kisfaludy wanted to tow one out to sea, sink it to the seafloor, and watch what happened. Whale falls, as marine biologists call such events, create pop-up habitats that may serve as stepping stones for organisms migrating from methane seeps or hydrothermal vents to other parts of the ocean. Precisely how this works, and which species colonize the carcass as it degrades, were open questions that Rouse hoped to answer.

In the e-mail, a biologist from noaa wrote that a large female fin whale had washed ashore four days previously, on the rocky beach at Point Loma, just west of downtown San Diego. The noaa team had already moved the carcass to the protected beaches of Mission Bay and performed a necropsy, concluding that the whale had been hit by a ship. Now they were ready to hand it over to Rouse: if he could mobilize the necessary resources on short notice, the whale was his to sink.

Rouse quickly met up with Kisfaludy to strategize. They needed a boat big enough to tow a sixty-foot, twenty-three-ton whale, so Kisfaludy leaned on a Newport-based friend, Chris Welsh, for the use of his large catamaran. To sink the carcass, they sourced five tons of rusty chains from Newport Harbor and another two tons of iron shackles from the Scripps scrap yard, in San Diego.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on March 14, 2019 by Editor

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Maggie In The Mud

Posted on March 13, 2019 by Editor

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Posted on March 12, 2019 by Editor

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2020 Best Picture Oscar Prediction – James Frey & Lena Waithe’s QUEEN AND SLIM

from Gold Derby

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture

by Paul Sheehan

Oscars-new-logo-and-statue

Predicting the winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture is never easy. We were sure the top prize at the 2019 Oscars would go to “Roma” but it was “Green Book” that won. In coming up with our 2020 Oscar predictions, we considered a slew of factors, starting with the preferential ballot used to determine the winner. Add in the pedigree of the filmmakers, the critical reception to the films, the box office tally and the track record of the studios. We take all of these into consideration again as we look ahead to the 2020 Academy Awards. (Scroll down for the most up-to-date 2020 Oscars predictions for Best Picture.)

Contenders began to emerge at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Others will be seen for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival in May. However, most of the top tier of Best Picture hopefuls won’t screen until September at four film festivals: Venice, Telluride, Toronto and New York. And a few will be held back till the last weeks of eligibility, getting limited releases in December.

Please note: Only those films with confirmed release dates are listed below. Check back often as new contenders are scheduled while other are dropped due to delays or critical reaction.

“Knives Out” (Lionsgate – November 27)
Writer/Director: Rian Johnson
Cast: Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Lakeith Stanfield, Michael Shannon, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer.
Plot: A modern murder mystery in a classic whodunit style.

“Queen & Slim” (Universal – November 27)
Director: Melina Matsoukas
Writers:  James Frey, Lena Waithe
Cast: Daniel Kaluuya, Bokeem Woodbine, Jodie Turner-Smith
Plot: A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over.

“The Souvenir” (A24 – May 17)
Writer/Director: Joanna Hogg
Cast: Tilda Swinton, Honor Swinton-Byrne, Tom Burke, Richard Ayoade
Plot: A film student in the early 1980s becomes romantically involved with a complicated and untrustworthy man.

[ click to read complete list of contenders at Gold Derby ]

Posted on March 11, 2019 by Editor

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Beatdown At The Bell

from CBS Philly

Watch: 6 Taco Bell Employees Beat Up Man And His Girlfriend Outside Center City Location

By Greg Argos

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A Taco Bell beatdown was captured on video. Taco Bell is taking action but the criminal investigation is just getting started.

Bryan Reese is the guy in blue on the ground. Video shows six people wearing Taco Bell uniforms surrounding him, one holding him down as the others serve up punches to his side.

After he gets up, the employees then deliver blows to his girlfriend Ali’s face.

It all happened on Chestnut Street near 10th, in front of the Center City location.

“I just stopped by the Taco Bell to pick some friends up who were getting food at the end of the night,” Reese said.

[ click to continue reading at CBS Philly ]

Posted on March 10, 2019 by Editor

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The Famous Joey Ryan Penis Flip

Posted on March 9, 2019 by Editor

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Ted Bundy Lives

from AP

Bundy’s deadly charm still polarizes, 40 years later

By DAN SEWELL

CINCINNATI (AP) — She kept her eyes on the dapper, wavy haired man who smiled, winked and exuded self-confidence as the courtroom proceedings moved along.

“I don’t know what it is he has, but he’s fascinating,” the teenage spectator explained to me at the time. “He’s impressive. He just has a kind of magnetism.”

It was that beguiling magnetism that investigators said helped make the object of her interest — Ted Bundy — one of the nation’s most prolific serial killers, with at least 30 women and girls’ deaths linked to him in a multiple-state spree that spanned the late 1970s.

I reported the teenager’s comments for The Associated Press’ coverage of Bundy’s 1979 murder trial in Miami, the first of two murder trials he would have in Florida. She was just one example of a regular courtroom backdrop of spellbound female spectators who were “attractive, young and single,” as I wrote at the time, just like the women Bundy was on trial for bludgeoning and sexually assaulting.

[ click to continue reading at AP ]

Posted on March 8, 2019 by Editor

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