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Twain Unexpurgated

from The New York Times

Dead for a Century, Twain Says What He Meant

By LARRY ROHTER

Wry and cranky, droll and cantankerous — that’s the Mark Twain we think we know, thanks to reading “Huck Finn” and “Tom Sawyer” in high school. But in his unexpurgated autobiography, whose first volume is about to be published a century after his death, a very different Twain emerges, more pointedly political and willing to play the role of the angry prophet.

Whether anguishing over American military interventions abroad or delivering jabs at Wall Street tycoons, this Twain is strikingly contemporary. Though the autobiography also contains its share of homespun tales, some of its observations about American life are so acerbic — at one point Twain refers to American soldiers as “uniformed assassins” — that his heirs and editors, as well as the writer himself, feared they would damage his reputation if not withheld.

“From the first, second, third and fourth editions all sound and sane expressions of opinion must be left out,” Twain instructed them in 1906. “There may be a market for that kind of wares a century from now. There is no hurry. Wait and see.”

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on July 10, 2010 by Editor

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The Fabulous Beekman Boys – Sexy Sexy Soap On Goat

from The Huffington Post

Thoughts On Making Soaps and Mating Goats At The Fabulous Beekman Boys Farm

In some cultures, three is considered a holy number. In others it is a lucky number. In still more, it an evil number. Whatever your particular beliefs, it’s clear that all of us everywhere, every single person in the whole wide world, has fascination with the number three. And guess what — last week was week number three of the Fabulous Beekman Boys. Woohoo, woohoo!!!

As I recap the episode, I will, as always, use the same scale of goats to indicate whether what I see makes it more or less likely that I follow Josh and Brent‘s example and leave NYC for a simpler life somewhere else.

The episode opens with some sexy sex talk. My hopes soar that this might be the best episode ever, of anything. I realize, however, that it is not human sex talk. It’s goat sex talk.

[ click to continue reading at The Huffington Post ]

Posted on July 9, 2010 by Editor

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Rainbowgasm

courtesy of Tucker C


Posted on July 9, 2010 by Editor

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Garlic Aioli

from The Arizona Republic

aioli.jpg

[ click to continue recipe at AZCentral.com ]

Posted on July 9, 2010 by Editor

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The Fabulous Beekman Boys Ep. #5 – Fresh Cheese and Even Fresher Bacon

from Treehugger.com

Thoughts on Cheese, Chores, and Harvesting Pigs At The Fabulous Beekman Boys Farm

by James Frey, New York

fabulous beekman boys tractor photo

Episode five in week four of The Fabulous Beekman Boys. As far as I know, neither the number four nor five are considered lucky or holy or particularly special. But this episode, I’m betting this episode is something special. Real special, real real, superduper special. As always, I’ll be working with the goat scale.

Brent gets a driving lesson. It is a driving lesson with a tractor. I have stated previously that I think tractors are cool. If I could ride on in NYC, and find somewhere to park, I would. There’s a not a taxi in the city that would fuck with me if I had a tractor. Five goats.

We learn that Brent is a bad driver. Bad drivers are a menace. We learn about Josh and Brent’s childhoods, and see cute pictures of them as kids. Brent likes winning awards. He is a perfectionist. Josh shoots guns and grew up in the country. I knew all of this already, because I have known them for many years, but it’s cute and well done. Brent’s bad: one goat. Cute childhood info: three goats.

Porgie and Bess, the Beekman Pigs. We learn they will be slaughtered soon. Fuck, I like the pigs. They’re fat, and I’m also a little fat, and they like to sleep, as do I, and they’re dirty, as I am sometimes. I don’t want the pigs to go. One goat

[ click to continue reading at Treehugger.com ]

Posted on July 8, 2010 by Editor

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Mess With The Bull, And You Get The Gore – Pamplona Bull Run Goes Bloody Awry

via DrudgeReport.com

Posted on July 8, 2010 by Editor

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I AM NUMBER FOUR First Day Of Filming (YouTube)

With thanks to redchun in Vandergrift, PA for the video


Posted on July 8, 2010 by Editor

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SHE IS NUMBER SIX – Theresa Palmer On Break @ I AM NUMBER FOUR Location

from Teen Hollywood

INTERVIEW: The “Magical” Theresa Palmer

By Lynn Barker on July 8, 2010 7:00:00 AM UTC

INTERVIEW: The
We’re with gorgeous young Aussie actress Theresa Palmer who gets to help save the world… even without magic or superpowers in the new fantasy/sci fi actioner The Sorcerer’s Apprentice.  Kinda overloaded from hearing “Oh, Theresa Palmer, that gorgeous Aussie girl who deflowered Harry Potter”, Theresa is totally moving on from her breakthrough role a few years back as Daniel Radcliffe’s beachside “fling” in the indie December Boys

On a break from shooting the Spielberg-produced Sci Fi film I Am Number Four, Theresa is sitting down with us in Beverly Hills to chat dating nerds, getting advice from Dan Radcliffe, doing stunts, hanging out off the “Sorcerer’s” set with good bud Jay Baruchel and she just revealed which iconic movie star she would love to play some day.

TeenHollywood: Did you enjoy taking on an action role.. or at least climbing a tower and running and saving the day along with the sorcerers? 

Theresa: I love being physically challenged in a role and especially in this movie. I felt like ‘Oh, the boys get to do all this cool stuff. When does Becky get to do the cool fun stuff?’  Then I got told I got to do that scene and had a stunt double for me that day but I was like ‘No! Let me do it. Please let me do it!  I don’t have a magical power but I want to be able to climb up something and save the world’. And she does. The movie I’m working on now I Am Number Four, is such a physically challenging role. I’m doing martial arts.

TeenHollywood: Tell us about your character in that and the story.

Theresa: I play an alien called “Six”. She’s one of nine aliens hiding out on Earth. An enemy alien found out that we’re hiding here so they’re come to kill us. They can only kill in our number order. They’ve killed One, Two and Three and they’re up to number Four (played by “Beastly’s” Alex Pettyfer).. thus the title but I decide to take matters into my own hands. If they’re going to try to kill us, I’m going to hunt them. Let’s get together and beat them!

[ read full interview with Theresa Palmer @ Teen Hollywood ]

Posted on July 8, 2010 by Editor

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I AM NUMBER FOUR – One-Sheet By Artist Fan taylahbob

created by taylahbob @ Deviant Art – thanks taylah

[ click to check out more of taylahbob’s work a DeviantArt.com ]

Posted on July 8, 2010 by Editor

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I bet we can make these books best sellers

Just What Can’t Betty White Do?

Can social media be focused to achieve a specific goal? It’s a question a Canadian author Catherine McKenzie asked herself when she saw the successful Facebook campaign to get Betty White to host Saturday Night Live.

McKenzie’s goal is to see if a Facebook group can be used to turn a book into a bestseller, and accordingly named her group “I bet we can make these books bestsellers”. Since starting the group in mid-May, it has grown to almost 800 members, and a related group on Goodreads has over 160 members.

The first two books McKenzie chose are Wyoming author Shawn Klomparens’ Jessica Z. and Two Years, No Rain. Of Jessica Z., Jeff VanderMeer of Ominovarious and the Huffington Post wrote that it “combines the concerns of literary fiction about sex and relationships with the kind of paralyzing sense of dread fueled by the continuing erosion of civil liberties. (…) Klomparens’s particular gift is to embed the details of our self-induced dissolution into an erotic coming-of-age story that’s not only slyly funny at times but has aspects of a thriller.”

I joined this group and am curious to see how it turns out. The more books people buy, the better.

Facebook group:
http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=113149048727107

Goodreads group:
http://www.goodreads.com/group/show/33611.Make_a_book_a_bestseller

Shawn Klomparens’ website:
www.shawnklomparens.com

Catherine McKenzie’s website:
www.catherinemckenzie.com

Posted on July 7, 2010 by JF

Filed under Literary News | | 1 Comment »

Terry Richardson No Longer Banned By W

from MediaBistro

After a 14 Year “Ban” Terry Richardson Back to Shooting for W

By Steve Delahoyde on Jun 22, 2010 07:00 AM

This writer figures that we’re all adults here and you can make up your own minds about regularly-controversial photographer Terry Richardson.

So feel free to take it as either the turning of a new leaf or the disintegration of principles with the news that, after a ban of nearly a decade and a half, Richardson is shooting again for W. With a big batch of job shifting going on at the magazine recently (mostly out the door) due to new editor Stefano Tonchi running the ship, the photographer has a bulky spread in their July issue, called ” Lunch Break.”

As New York‘s fashion blog reports, this follows the magazine refusing to hire him since 1996 when then-art director Dennis Freeman“reportedly banned Richardson from his pages after taking offense to a photo the photographer took of a model with her head in the oven.”

[ click to read full post at MediaBistro.com ]

Posted on July 6, 2010 by Editor

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No More Raves in L.A.

Posted on July 5, 2010 by Editor

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Steven Spielberg & George Lucas Get Their Rockwells On

from The New York Times

America, Illustrated

By DEBORAH SOLOMON

IN an age when Democrats and Republicans are barely on speaking terms, you might not think that decades-old paintings of freckled schoolboys and their loyal mutts could help revive the conversation about what we value as a nation. Yet Norman Rockwell’s cheerful America has lately acquired a startling relevance both inside and outside the art world, in part because it symbolizes an era when connectivity did not require a USB cable.

Rockwell’s paintings are easy to recognize. In the years surrounding World War II his covers for The Saturday Evening Post depicted America as a small-town utopia where people are consistently decent and possess great reserves of fellow-feeling. Doctors spend time with patients whether or not they have health insurance. Students cherish their teachers and remember their birthdays. Citizens at town hall meetings stand up and speak their mind without getting booed or shouted down by gun-toting rageaholics.

This is America before the fall, or at least before searing divisions in our government and general population shattered any semblance of national solidarity. Rockwell’s scenes of the small and the local speak to us in the age of the global because they offer a fantasy of civic togetherness that today seems increasingly remote. “To me the most important part of Rockwell’s work is that it illustrates compassion and caring about other people,” the filmmaker George Lucas, who lives in Marin County, Calif., said recently. “You could almost say he was a Buddhist painter.”

Steven Spielberg, speaking from Los Angeles, had similar praise. “Anything for Norman,” he said, when asked to discuss his work. “He was always on my mind because I had a great deal of respect for how he could tell stories in a single frozen image. Entire stories.”

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on July 4, 2010 by Editor

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The Cowboy Poetry Gathering @ Elko 2010

from The Guardian UK

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on July 3, 2010 by Editor

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“Who Is Leah Reader”, asks Pittacus Lore

from Leah Reader’s Words Fail Me Blog

WHO IS PITTACUS LORE?

The latest YA mega-sensation poised to vie for Twilight’s throne is the book I Am Number Four, the first of a new alien-teen-superhero series authored by the enigmatic “Pittacus Lore.” Note that while the book doesn’t launch until August 3rd, Michael Bay is already producing the movie (in conjunction with Steven Spielberg).

But just who is Pittacus Lore? According to HarperCollins’s author page:

Pittacus Lore is Lorien’s ruling Elder. He has been on Earth for the last twelve years, preparing for the war that will decide Earth’s fate. His whereabouts are unknown.

You see, the book is actually written by one of the characters in the book. Neat! Crazy! Mind-bending!

Except Pittacus Lore is actually James Frey, the notorious liar and drug addict whose“memoir” A Million Little Pieces was revealed to be more fiction than non-fiction (afterOprah embarrassingly lauded Mr. Frey for his gritty honesty).

So, y’know, just keep that in mind: Pittacus Lore is James Frey. James Frey is Pittacus Lore. The same James Frey who scammed Oprah and millions of naive memoir-readers. The same James Frey who somehow still has a literary career, utilizing various pseudonyms to publish shitty books. That James Frey.

[ click to continue reading at leahreader.com ]

Posted on July 1, 2010 by Editor

Filed under Projects | | 1 Comment »

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