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You Should See Her Play Field Hockey

Elizabeth Lambert – Soccer Assassiness

Posted on November 9, 2009 by Editor

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Greatest Stroller Ever Recalled For Amputating Children’s Fingers

from ABCNews

One Million Maclaren Strollers Recalled — What’s up?

November 09, 2009 12:02 PM

Name of product: Maclaren Strollers

Units: About one million

Distributor: Maclaren USA, Inc., of South Norwalk, Conn.

Hazard: The stroller’s hinge mechanism poses a fingertip amputation and laceration hazard to the child when the consumer is unfolding/opening the stroller.

Incidents/Injuries: The firm has received 15 reports of children placing their finger in the stroller’s hinge mechanism, resulting in 12 reports of fingertip amputations in the United States.

Description: This recall involves all Maclaren single and double umbrella strollers. The word “Maclaren” is printed on the stroller. The affected models included Volo, Triumph, Quest Sport, Quest Mod, Techno XT, TechnoXLR, Twin Triumph, Twin Techno and Easy Traveller.

[ click to continue reading at ABCNews.com ]

Posted on November 9, 2009 by Editor

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Sick-ass Amazing With A Blanket On Top – Jeff Beck and Imogen Heap

Posted on November 8, 2009 by Editor

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Kindle & The Great Age of Infrastructure

from John Gerzema’s THE BRAND BUBBLE

The Great Age of Infrastructure

by JOHN GERZEMA on AUGUST 19, 2009

I had an interesting discussion with James Frey, author of ‘A Million Little Pieces’ and ‘Bright Shiny Morning’ the other day.  He was showing me all the books he was reading on his Kindle. I think if Jeff Bezos would have been at this barbeque, he would have signed up James to do his ads.  But the interesting point James raised was that the value isn’t the device, but the pipe. Kindle isn’t really beautiful, or incredibly versatile. But because Amazon has built the means to virtually access books, magazines and other literature anytime, anywhere, our reading behavior is being transformed.

Like iPod’s value is in iTunes, and iPhone in its applications, infrastructure is once again, king. Just as Tom Friedman pointed out that cheap fiber optics after the 2000 recession enabled global commerce, the investments of the early part of this decade by Amazon, Apple, Cisco and others are now bearing fruit as this recession begins to abate. And this is creating value for a whole host of new partners. Consider my conversations last week with Andrew Rashbass, CEO of the Economist, they have found a burgeoning Kindle audience, which supplements their existing print readership.

[ click to continue reading at TheBrandBubble.com ]

Posted on November 8, 2009 by Editor

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Mano’s Low Pass

Posted on November 7, 2009 by Editor

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When White Folk Skank

Posted on November 7, 2009 by Editor

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Heroes Freakin’ Rule

Posted on November 6, 2009 by Editor

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La Danse

from The New York Times

La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet (2009)

La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet

Photograph from Zipporah Films

A scene from “La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet,” a documentary filmed at the Palais Garnier.

Creating Dialogue From Body Language

By A. O. SCOTT

In “La Danse: The Paris Opera Ballet,” his 36th documentary in more than 40 years, Frederick Wiseman takes his camera into the stately and elegant Palais Garnier in Paris, observing rehearsals, staff meetings and, finally, performances of seven dances, including classics like “The Nutcracker” and spiky new work by younger choreographers. To say that the film, sumptuous in its length and graceful in its rhythm, is a feast for ballet lovers is to state the obvious and also to sell Mr. Wiseman’s achievement a bit short. Yes, this is one of the finest dance films ever made, but there’s more to it than that.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on November 6, 2009 by Editor

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Stealing from American Indians

from Art Market Monitor nee The Wall Street Journal

Stealing from American Indians

by Marion Maneker

In art, they say that talent borrows and genius steals. Either way, American Indian artisans are getting pushed out of their own market, according to the Wall Street Journal. The numbers of imported knockoffs of American Indian designs are simply staggering and heartbreaking, since much of the imported work is intentionally passed off as the real thing:

The authentic Indian-made earrings are on the right.

The authentic Indian-made earrings are on the right.

The Indian Arts and Crafts Association, a trade group, estimates that nationally, as much as 75% of the roughly $1 billion of jewelry, pottery, rugs and other merchandise sold every year as authentic is not.

In the jewelry business, as many as 90% of pieces held out as examples of Native American craftsmanship are fake, according to the New Mexico attorney general’s consumer-protection division, which is trying to police the trade along with federal authorities.

But it is extremely hard to tell the genuine goods from the faux artifacts, artists and experts say.

[ click to continue reading at Art Market Monitor or WSJ ]

Posted on November 6, 2009 by Editor

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Why Music Videos Can Still Be Fun To Watch

Posted on November 5, 2009 by Editor

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Homem de Aranha

from The Guardian UK

Brazil crime wars: Spiderman’s story of drugs and Jesus in Rio’s slums

How evangelical preachers are trying to stem the tide of killings in the Olympic city

by Tom Phillips in Rio de Janeiro

“If you add them all up I control 15 communities,” boasted Spiderman as his shiny 4×4 hurtled through the narrow backstreets of western Rio de Janeiro. Behind the wheel was Juarez Mendes da Silva, 28, one of the Brazilian capital’s most wanted drug lords, better known by the nickname Spiderman. The words “Jesus” and “Christ” were tattooed on to his forearms in black. In the boot his pet dog, Bloodsucker, shared space with an M-16 assault rifle.

With the dashboard’s electronic clock marking 2am, the car careered through the Complexo da Coréia, one of the city’s largest and most notorious slums, home to around 60,000 Brazilians and the HQ of one of the city’s three main drug factions, the Pure Third Command.

What would happen if we ran into the police? “They would open fire,” Spiderman replied bluntly, his mouth half full with fluorescent pink candy. Welcome to the inner-sanctums of a murky underworld of murder, violence and solitude that is rarely seen by outsiders. Spiderman was conducting a guided tour of the sprawling slum where he was born, and where he was now in charge of the area’s lucrative drug trade and the leader of 200-strong private militia of heavily-armed young men.

“The lives we lead – we know they aren’t right,” he stuttered, pulling up outside a local sweet shop so he could stock-up on candy.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on November 5, 2009 by Editor

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Bikies crow, “It’s going to be a better option for us if he’s in jail.”

from the Sydney Morning Herald

Bikies have Coles in their sights

EAMONN DUFF AND STEVE BARRETT, November 1, 2009

AN OUTLAW motorcycle gang has threatened jail-yard violence against the alleged mastermind of Australia’s largest art fraud – if he is ever sent to prison.

The gang said 10 of its members were allegedly ripped off for a total of $1 million by former Sydney art dealer Ron Coles.

Fraud detectives have been investigating Mr Coles after receiving more than 150 complaints from art collectors and investors from whom he allegedly disappeared with more than $30 million in paintings and cash.

After Mr Coles’s hiding spot – on the Central Coast where he drives taxis to make ends meet – was revealed, a senior member of one of the state’s largest outlaw clubs threatened his safety.

The club member said it was waiting for police to charge Mr Coles before it took action.

”It’s going to be a better option for us if he’s in jail,” the member said. ”It doesn’t matter where he gets sent, we can get to him once that happens. It’ll be easier to work with him inside there.”

[ click to continue reading at SMH.com.au ]

Posted on November 5, 2009 by Editor

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“It’s an exciting time in the art world – no one really owns the 21st Century.”

Posted on November 5, 2009 by Editor

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Pirate Cat Gone. The FCC is comprised of a bunch of assholes.

from The San Francisco Appeal

Where Were You When They Shut Down Pirate Cat Radio?

Chances are, when you’ve tired of your 19th straight listen to Black Eyed Pea’s latest jam, or can no longer stand the banal, pre-fabricated opinions that litter the FM airwaves, you have stumbled across a true San Francisco gem — 87.9 fm, Pirate Cat Radio. Chances are if you have tried to find it again this last month, you’ve heard only static.

That is because the FCC recently put an end to Pirate Cat’s 13-year reign of terrestrial broadcasting, and fined PCR founder Monkey $10,000. The FCC sites a breach in section 301 of the US Communications Act of 1934, which forbids any person from transmitting signals by radio from within the United States without a license.

Pirate Cat has always been aware of this breach, but argue that they are legally allowed to do so. They cite the US Code Federal Regulations Title 47 Section 73.3542, which authorizes broadcasting without a license in times of national emergency, or continued involvement in a war.

The FCC’s order has volunteers and listeners livid. In a statement posted on Pirate Cat’s website, Monkey argues that since the FCC was first established to provide fair, efficient, and equitable distribution of radio service to serve the public interest, shutting down a radio station which does just that is preposterous and hypocritical.

The statement continues:

[ click to continue reading PCR statement at SFAppeal.com ]

[ click to visit Pirate Cat Radio – no federal a-holes allowed ]

Posted on November 4, 2009 by Editor

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The Wave

Posted on November 4, 2009 by Editor

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Black and WTF

from the BLACK AND WTF photo blog

Posted on November 3, 2009 by Editor

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Pinball Lives

from The New York Daily News

Pinball Hall of Fame: The Williams Collection

BY STU HORVATH
DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER
Friday, October 9th 2009, 1:43 PM

The glory days of the arcades may be over, but pinball lives on in “Pinball Hall of Fame: The Williams Collection.”

It is hard to believe that in the era of first person frag-fests that a collection of classic pinball games can be so compelling, but developer FarSight Studios delivers something special with this anthology. With a combination of smooth controls, a loving attention to detail and a healthy dose of nostalgia, the budget title more than justifies its $40 price.

Pinball enthusiasts will drool over the extremely realistic rendering of such classic machines as Black Knight and Medieval Madness. There’s a good chance that the playfield and backglass art never looked this good in real life.

[ click to continue reading at NYDailyNews.com ]

Posted on November 2, 2009 by Editor

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Porecore Twitchtronica

from The Daily Swarm nee The Stranger

Posted on November 1, 2009 by Editor

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The 5000 Fingers of Dr. T

from The Guardian UK

The view: The 5,000 Fingers of Dr T and other great lost children’s films

Why put up with tat the likes of Daddy Day Care or Beverly Hills Chihuahua when there’s a treasure trove of genuinely brilliant kids’ films out there?

The 5,000 Fingers of Dr T (1953)

Beware the child catchers … The 5,000 Fingers of Dr T. Photograph: Ronald Grant Archive

Let’s not be ungrateful here – for film-lovers with kids, these are heady times indeed. I’m not sure even the fond reception Fantastic Mr Fox received quite did justice to its handmade pleasures (the wolf salute alone makes me want to hug Wes Anderson and not let go). And then, of course, there’s Up, the movie that’s repeated WALL-E‘s trick of emerging as possibly the year’s finest film while being made (at least ostensibly) for an audience still doing its shoes up with Velcro. Whichever way you look at it, in the context of the careless tat parents usually have to dodge or suffer through, the autumn of 2009 has been a vintage season.

But the snag is that at some point in the future, these two gleaming moments will recede, and life for the young cinephile will return to normal. And normal is a bleak business for children’s movies in Britain, a wearying parade of the slapdash and tossed-off. Which is why it’s doubly frustrating when some of the most genuinely brilliant kids’ films ever made aren’t even available, much less as accessible and celebrated as they should be. It’s a sorry situation that brings me muttering darkly to the subject of The 5,000 Fingers of Dr T.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on November 1, 2009 by Editor

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Progenitor of “Popular Culture” Professor Ray B. Browne Gone

from the Toledo Blade

RAY B. BROWNE, 1922-2009
BGSU professor began popular culture center

BOWLING GREEN – Ray B. Browne, 87, who created an academic discipline and a national movement by studying the stuff of everyday life – whether comic books, fast food, pop tunes, or situation comedies – died Thursday in his home of congestive heart failure.

“He’s the father of popular culture studies,” said Gary Hoppenstand, a professor of American studies at Michigan State University, and a popular culture graduate student at Bowling Green State University and protege of Mr. Browne’s.

“He’s done more to affect studies in the humanities than any other individual the last 30 or 40 years.”

Mr. Browne began the Center for the Study of Popular Culture in 1968 at BGSU. The Popular Culture Library followed.

In 1973, despite detractors, he began a distinct department of popular culture. His history of the popular culture movement’s early struggle is called Against Academia.

“Ray opened the windows of the academy, just opened them up,” said Michael Marsden, one of the department’s first faculty members, now dean and academic vice president of St. Norbert College, De Pere, Wis. “We have the people’s culture being studied, and we’re learning how complex and wonderful and significant it is.”

The BGSU department was the first of its kind.

[ click to continue reading at ToledoBlade.com ]

Posted on November 1, 2009 by Editor

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You’re Breaking My Ribs With Those Thighs, Lady

Posted on November 1, 2009 by Editor

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