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Baatin Gone

from The Detroit Free Press

Slum Village rapper Baatin dead at 35

Detroit native, known for spiritual lyrics, had recently returned to group

BY BRIAN MCCOLLUM • FREE PRESS POP MUSIC WRITER • AUGUST 1, 2009

Titus (Baatin) Glover, the Detroit rapper who co-founded the much-acclaimed Slum Village, has died.

Baatin, who turned 35 in March, left Slum Village in 2002, later telling the Free Press he had been diagnosed with schizophrenia. He continued to record and play occasional solo dates before returning to the Slum fold for the group’s upcoming album, “Villa Manifesto,” due Sept. 22.

Word of Baatin’s passing circulated quickly this afternoon in music circles both locally and nationally, where Slum Village has long been an exalted name in underground hip-hop.

[ click to read full obit at the Detroit Free Press ]

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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The Art of Harvey Kurtzman

from the New York Times

The Art of Rebellion

From “The Art of Harvey Kurtzman”

More Photos >

If not for Mad magazine, there might never have been (in no particular order) 1960s youth culture, underground comics, Wacky Packs, “Laugh-In,” “Saturday Night Live,” R. CrumbArt Spiegelman or an age of irony, period. Mad, which began in 1952 as a comic book that parodied “serious” comics as well as American popular culture, with an emphasis on television, movies and advertising, was conceived and originally edited by Harvey Kurtzman (1924-93), a Brooklyn-born comic-strip artist, writer and editor. Kurtzman was the spiritual father of postwar American satire and the godfather of late-20th-century alternative humor. If this seems like hyperbole, all you have to do is read The Art of Harvey Kurtzman: The Mad Genius of Comics (Abrams Comic Arts, $40), Denis Kitchen and Paul Buhle’s insightful, entertaining and profusely illustrated (with rare images of original work) biographical monograph, which chronicles almost everything Kurtzman accomplished — and that was quite a lot.

“In Mad and all his subsequent ventures,” the authors write, “Kurtzman drew a bead on the phony aspects and idiosyncrasies of modern commercial culture…. He took on Senator Joseph McCarthy as surely and seriously in the pages of Mad as Edward R. Murrow did on television.” He also fought against a wave of comic-art censorship that overtook the country in the ’50s and fostered the restrictive Comics Code (echoing the role of the Hays Office for motion pictures).

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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A Heart Valve Tree

from Oregon Health & Science University

Heart valves grow on trees

At the time of the receipt of the Howard J. Stroud Papers (Accession 2007-015), we posted a short notice in this space. Beyond creating a basic inventory of the collection, not much processing has gone on in the ensuing months.

This morning, I was poking through the photographs looking for interesting images of heart research here in Oregon–since Stroud was director of the Oregon Heart Association for decades. The collection does not disappoint. Along with numerous photos of dignitaries, events, researchers, and heart surgery, we have this shot of the Starr-Edwards heart valve tree. Written in ink on the back of the photo is this information: “Forming a pattern set-up, “tree”, from expendable wax patterns. This setup will be coated with mold material. Patterns removed by heat to form mold. Metal poured into ceramic mold to form castings.”

[ click to continue reading at OHSU.edu ]

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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Create Your Own Library Card

from Kimbooktu.com

Library Card Generator January 17, 2007

Filed under: Humour — Kim @ 1:34 pm

This great fun! On this site you can make your own library card. You can put anything on it. If you press the button to make it a couple of times you get all sorts of varieties on your card. Sometimes the card is a different color, or the handwriting changes. This is mine:

Thanks to Darmok for finding this fun site!

Library card

[ click to read at Kimbooktu.com ]

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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The 80s Dance

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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The Louvre Online (Searchable Database of Museum Works)

from the New York Times Arts Beat blog

louvre.jpg

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on August 7, 2009 by Editor

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John Hughes Gone

from TIME

hughes.jpg

[ click to continue reading at TIME.com ]

Posted on August 6, 2009 by Editor

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The Top Ten Book Sites On The Net

from The Times Online

The 10 best book websites

On the internet, you can download page after page of free material, post your work online and even catch a publisher’s eye

by Mike Peake

Literature is thriving on the web. It’s not just for sale on mega-sites such as Amazon either, but being swapped, analysed and recommended by fellow bookworms. You can download page after page of free material, post your work online and — dare we say it — even catch the eye of a publisher.

DailyLit.com

Fancy a daily dose of literature? Just sign up, select a book (the emphasis is on out-of-copyright classics, and most are free), then set aside a few minutes a day to read the pages the site e-mails to you at whatever time you choose. The text is readable on a computer and most mobile devices.

Shelfari.com

Described as a “social network for people who love books”, this site consists of a lot of people cataloguing the books they have on their shelves then indulging in some lively literary banter. For a similar proposition, check out LibraryThing.com.

RareBookRoom.org

You’ll probably never get your hands on a first-edition Shakespeare, but this is the next-best thing: 400 priceless literary treasures scanned in ultra high-resolution, now yours to peruse online.

[ click to read at The Times Online ]

Posted on August 6, 2009 by Editor

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VRAOUM!

from Radio France Internationale

Slap! Pow! Bam! … VRAOUM!

by Laura Angela Bagnetto

Article published on the 2009-08-02 Latest update 2009-08-03 17:01 TU

Gilles Barbier, The Hospice, 2002La Maison Rouge

Gilles Barbier, The Hospice, 2002
La Maison Rouge

Slap! Pow! Bam! Anyone who’s read those words knows they come from the world of the comic strip, beloved by children and adults alike for over 100 years. At La Maison Rouge in Paris, the Vraoum!exhibition celebrates the world of comics in its original form alongside contemporary art that has been influenced by the funny papers.

[ click to read at RFI.fr ]

Posted on August 6, 2009 by Editor

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“You føcking stupid… title thieving… føcking little slut.”

from The Rumpus

The Rumpus Interview with Jill Sobule

STEPHEN ELLIOTT

Jill Sobule: For those that don’t know or are very young, I had a song in 1995 called, “I Kissed a Girl.” When Katy Perry’s version came out I  started getting tons of inquiries  about what I thought. Some folks (and protective friends) were angry, and wondered why she took my title and made it into this kind of  ”girls gone wild” thing.  Others, including my mother, were excited because they thought I would  somehow make some money out of it. Unfortunately you can’t copyright a title… bummer.

As a musician I  have always  refrained from criticizing another artist. I was, “well, good for her.” It did bug me a little bit, however, when she said she came up with the idea for the title in a dream. In truth, she wrote it with a team of professional writers and was signed by the very same guy that signed me in 1995. I  have not  mentioned that in interviews as I don’t  want to sound bitter or petty… cause, that’s not me.

Okay, maybe, if I  really think about it, there were a few jealous and pissed off moments. So here goes, for the first time in an interview: Fuck you Katy Perry, you fucking stupid, maybe “not good for the gays,” title thieving, haven’t heard much else, so not quite sure if you’re talented, fucking little slut.

[ click to read full interview at TheRumpus.net ]

Posted on August 6, 2009 by Editor

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Emmy & ATAS: “I was just thinking what an interesting concept it is to eliminate the writer from the artistic process.”

from FishbowlLA @ MediaBistro

Emmy Format Shift Angers Writers

1emmy_award_lg.jpgThe Emmy awards announced Thursday plans for a change in the format of the ceremony. Eight of the 28 Emmy categories will be pre-taped, in order to shave minutes off the lengthy program time. Two of the categories excluded from the ceremony are for writing, and given that there are only four writing categories in the Emmys to start with, There’s understandably some resentment. More than 100 television writers have signed a letter protesting the changes. James Hibberd at The Hollywood Reporterhas the letter, and further details:

We, the undersigned showrunners and executive producers of television’s current line-up of programs, oppose the Academy of Television Arts and Science’s decision to remove writing awards from the live telecast. This decision conveys a fundamental understatement of the importance of writers in the creation of television programming and a symbolic attack on the primacy of writing in our industry.

[ click to read full post at MediaBistro ]

Posted on August 4, 2009 by Editor

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MÄN SOM HATAR KVINNOR (or, The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)

Posted on August 4, 2009 by Editor

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WaPo Whining Called Out

from Gawker

The Time Gawker Put the Washington Post Out of Business

 

Spurred on by his editor, a Washington Post reporter complained over the weekend that we “stole” his profile of a ridiculous “generational guru” when we blogged about it on this site. Our question: where’s your outrage at your editors?

To summarize this little media controversy: reporter Ian Shapira profiled Anne Loehr, a consultant who gets companies to pay her to explain the mysteries of Gen Y. Our own Hamilton Nolan wrote an item about it in which he reprinted four of Loehr’s most laughable quotes and ridiculed them. After initially being pleased that his metro profile got some play on a widely read blog, Shapira changed his mind when he got an email from his editor: “They stole your story. Where’s your outrage, man?” This led Shapira, in a piece for the Post‘s Outlook section, to conclude that his job is doomed.

[ click to continue reading at Gawker.com ]

Posted on August 4, 2009 by Editor

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Clip ‘n Dales

from Guadalara Joe

Posted on August 3, 2009 by MJS

Filed under Mirth | | No Comments »

Science Proves Cats Indeed Are Evil

from Scientific American

Cat Call Coerces Can Opening

A study in the journal Current Biology finds that some cat purrs include a high-frequency plaintive component that gets people to do cats’ bidding. Karen Hopkin reports
Listen to this podcast:

image of Evil Cat from Jane HellerAnyone who’s ever had a cat knows how demanding they can be. Let me out, let me in, give me food, give me different food. The list goes on. But how do these clever kitties convince us to do their bidding? A study in the July 14 issue of Current Biology suggests it’s all in how they ask.

Karen McComb of the University of Sussex started studying persuasive cat calls after realizing that her own pet used a hybrid between a purr and a cry to get her out of bed in the morning. McComb got recordings of other cat calls. And back in the lab, she found that humans thought purrs made by cats who were trying to solicit a snack were more urgent, and less pleasant, than those made when kitty was, say, relaxing on the sofa. 

Turns out that the “feed me” purr includes a high-frequency component, absent from the contented purr, that makes people want to reach for a can opener just to make Fluffy stop. It’s obviously part of “Fluffy’s Master Plan (song) for World Domination.”

—Karen Hopkin

[ click to read at Scientific American ]

Posted on August 3, 2009 by Editor

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Video Of Largest Snake Ever Found

Posted on August 3, 2009 by Editor

Filed under Mirth | | 1 Comment »

“Well, you see, Judge, it got all small and grew teeth – and so now she wants a divorce.”

rufus.jpg

Posted on August 3, 2009 by JK

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Support Your Local Library

from The Guardian UK

UK’s most prolific library book borrower

by Severin Carrell

A 91-year-old woman from Stranraer in south-west Scotland is believed to be Britain’s most prolific library book reader after staff at her local library realised she is on the brink of borrowing her 25,000th book. Louise Brown, who borrowed her first book from Castle Douglas library in 1946, now reads about 12 books every week – chiefly Mills & Boon romances, war stories and historical dramas – and has never had a fine for returning a book late.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on August 3, 2009 by Editor

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Two Pi Bitches

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Kigurumi Yu

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Behind The Lists

from Slate (lifted from Michelle Gagnon, author of the great book BONEYARD)

The Book Industry’s Best-Seller ListsWhat are they, and why do they matter so much?

Illustration by Mark Alan Stamaty

These days, it seems as if half the books in bookstores have the word “best seller” or some variant on the cover or the flap copy, as in “the best-selling author of …” But what does that mean? About as much as the phrase “original recipe” does on a jar of spaghetti sauce. Neither the government nor the publishing industry regulates the use of the term, and besides, there are many different kinds of best-seller lists published every week in the United States. There are the major national lists (the New York Times, theWall Street JournalUSA Today, and Publishers Weekly) and the major regional lists (the Washington Post, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, and the Chicago Tribune). There are lists that compare sales at chain stores with sales at independent stores. There are romance lists, business lists, African-American lists, religious lists, health lists, and children’s lists.

What is a best-seller list? It is a ranking of the relative sales of particular kinds of books at certain groups of stores within a one-week period. Best-seller lists tell us not which books sell the most, in absolute terms, but which fiction, nonfiction, or advice books sell the fastest at the bookstores list makers think deserve attention. A how-to book that sells 20,000 copies in one week will shoot to the top of the best-seller lists, whether or not those are the only copies it ever sells. A novel that sells 200 copies a week for 10 years will never appear on the lists, because each week it will be beaten by faster-selling books.

[ click to continue reading at Slate.com ]

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Little Boots in the Bedroom Getting Her Tenori-on

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Two Turntables And A Set of Sure-Grip Wheels

from The Independent UK

Could roller disco save clubbing?

A series of skating events, starting tonight, will be hosted by high-profile DJs, as music promoters experiment with new ways to make the crowds roll in. Emma Love reports

DJs these days pop up in the most unexpected places. Not just in nightclubs or on the summer festival circuit, but now as entertainment at roller discos too. Yes, you read that right; it seems that roller discos are having something of a moment, helped along by a healthy dose of well-known DJs on the decks and plenty of live performances by bands. But is this latest mix-up in the arts world a step too far – we’re already used to seeing poetry and book classes at festivals, dance in art galleries, theatre under railway arches, pianos on the streets and debates in nightclubs – or simply a brilliant swing back to all things 1970s with a cool, live music twist?

It’s not that roller discos haven’t always had DJs on the decks, rather it’s that by introducing high-profile names and live bands to perform alongside them, they’ve suddenly upped their game considerably. What was once just a kitsch night out with a touch of nostalgia has become a music event that counts. The question is what’s next: live gospel choirs singing Christmas carols at ice-skating rinks? Now that would definitely be something else worth getting your skates on for.

[ click to read full article at The Independent ]

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Cobus Toxicity

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Run And Pee And Miss Not A Beat

from TwinCities.com

Web site helps time mid-movie bathroom breaks

By Jake Coyle, Associated Press

NEW YORK — The mid-movie dash to the restroom can turn us into calculating Hussein Bolt wannabes: Ah, this looks like a lull — time to dash.

When we return to our seats, we pray the answer to “What did I miss?” isn’t “Darth Vader is really Luke’s father” or “the girlfriend is a really guy.”

The Web site RunPee.com can help with such anxious guess work.

The site provides recommended opportunities to race to the restroom. It tells you when the action or romance wanes, and gives you a cue (“Baby O.J. is taken from Bruno”) for your exit.

There are, of course, limits to the usefulness of RunPee. But it’s also found friends in cyberspace like WhereToWee.com, a site in the works that tells you where the nearest restroom is.

[ click to read at TwinCities.com ]

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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High-tailing It Out Of Church

from The NY Daily News

Preston Scarbrough, 7, ‘steals’ family car to avoid going to church and leads police on a car chase

Aww! The lengths some people will go to avoid attending church.

A seven-year-old boy in Plain City, Utah, decided it was too hot to go to church on July 26, so he “borrowed” the family car and went on a joy ride instead.

Responding to calls of an unusually small, reckless driver, the Weber County Sheriff’s Officereleased dash-cam video of the boy as he led police on a low-speed chase.

Deputies found the car near the local high school and tailed it for 10 blocks, all while the driver weaved in traffic lanes and blew through stop signs.

Preston maintained speeds up to 45 miles an hour, even though he had some trouble reaching the pedals.

“His speed was slow, but erratic … and so he would kind of scoot down lower to push on the gas and kinda sit up on the seat more to see right where he was going,” Bell said.

The chase came to an end at Preston’s home, when he got out of the car, ran and hid in the basement.

[ click to read at NY Daily News ]

Posted on August 2, 2009 by Editor

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Old Folks Music Reviews

Posted on August 1, 2009 by Editor

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