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Posted on March 24, 2019 by Editor

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55,000 Hours Of Boxing Archives

from The New York Times

For Sale: This Massive, Obsessive and (Probably) Obsolete VHS Boxing Archive

Forty years of boxing matches — as many as 55,000 individual fights — have been painstakingly preserved in a video archive. In the age of YouTube and cloud storage, is it worth anything?

By Alex Vadukul

Rock’ Em Sock’ Em Robots.CreditVincent Tullo for The New York Times

There’s a small apartment on 137th Street in Hamilton Heights that contains one of the most peculiar videotape collections in New York. The dusty VHS archive fills a vast library that contains the analog history of a sport: 8,000 cassettes with recordings of over 55,000 boxing matches that span 40 years.

It was the life’s work of Bela Szilagyi, a classical pianist and passionate fight enthusiast, who started the collection in 1979 when he taped a featherweight title match on a Quasar videocassette recorder. Mr. Szilagyi died in 2012 at 78 years old and his wife, a soft-spoken piano teacher, became the collection’s archivist.

On a recent Sunday night, Elizabeth Szilagyi, 76, commenced her ritual in the living room. She poured herself a glass of red wine, put on her reading glasses, and sat in front of her TV with a notepad in hand to record a welterweight fight at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles. She ate a salad while taking notes about the match for the information card that gets filed in the archive. The bell rang and the boxers marched toward each other.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on March 23, 2019 by Editor

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Old Order New Monday

Posted on March 15, 2019 by Editor

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Whale Fall

from The New Yorker

A Whale’s Afterlife

On the day before Thanksgiving, 2011, Greg Rouse, a trim marine biologist in his fifties, was tidying his lab at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, in La Jolla, California. Rouse studies the worms and other small animals that inhabit the deep sea. He was organizing his microscopes, dissection supplies, and jars of deep-sea critters when he received a long-anticipated e-mail.

In the late two-thousands, Rouse and Eddie Kisfaludy, then an operations manager for Virgin Oceanic, had begun meeting with officials from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (noaa) and the city of San Diego to pitch an alternative approach to the disposal of dead whales. Often, whales that wash up on shore are hauled to landfills or pushed back into the water. Rouse and Kisfaludy wanted to tow one out to sea, sink it to the seafloor, and watch what happened. Whale falls, as marine biologists call such events, create pop-up habitats that may serve as stepping stones for organisms migrating from methane seeps or hydrothermal vents to other parts of the ocean. Precisely how this works, and which species colonize the carcass as it degrades, were open questions that Rouse hoped to answer.

In the e-mail, a biologist from noaa wrote that a large female fin whale had washed ashore four days previously, on the rocky beach at Point Loma, just west of downtown San Diego. The noaa team had already moved the carcass to the protected beaches of Mission Bay and performed a necropsy, concluding that the whale had been hit by a ship. Now they were ready to hand it over to Rouse: if he could mobilize the necessary resources on short notice, the whale was his to sink.

Rouse quickly met up with Kisfaludy to strategize. They needed a boat big enough to tow a sixty-foot, twenty-three-ton whale, so Kisfaludy leaned on a Newport-based friend, Chris Welsh, for the use of his large catamaran. To sink the carcass, they sourced five tons of rusty chains from Newport Harbor and another two tons of iron shackles from the Scripps scrap yard, in San Diego.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on March 14, 2019 by Editor

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Maggie In The Mud

Posted on March 13, 2019 by Editor

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Join Me On Instagram

from Instagram

[ click to visit my Instagram page ]

Posted on March 12, 2019 by Editor

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2020 Best Picture Oscar Prediction – James Frey & Lena Waithe’s QUEEN AND SLIM

from Gold Derby

2020 Oscar Predictions: Best Picture

by Paul Sheehan

Oscars-new-logo-and-statue

Predicting the winner of the Academy Award for Best Picture is never easy. We were sure the top prize at the 2019 Oscars would go to “Roma” but it was “Green Book” that won. In coming up with our 2020 Oscar predictions, we considered a slew of factors, starting with the preferential ballot used to determine the winner. Add in the pedigree of the filmmakers, the critical reception to the films, the box office tally and the track record of the studios. We take all of these into consideration again as we look ahead to the 2020 Academy Awards. (Scroll down for the most up-to-date 2020 Oscars predictions for Best Picture.)

Contenders began to emerge at the Sundance Film Festival in January. Others will be seen for the first time at the Cannes Film Festival in May. However, most of the top tier of Best Picture hopefuls won’t screen until September at four film festivals: Venice, Telluride, Toronto and New York. And a few will be held back till the last weeks of eligibility, getting limited releases in December.

Please note: Only those films with confirmed release dates are listed below. Check back often as new contenders are scheduled while other are dropped due to delays or critical reaction.

“Knives Out” (Lionsgate – November 27)
Writer/Director: Rian Johnson
Cast: Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Lakeith Stanfield, Michael Shannon, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette, Christopher Plummer.
Plot: A modern murder mystery in a classic whodunit style.

“Queen & Slim” (Universal – November 27)
Director: Melina Matsoukas
Writers:  James Frey, Lena Waithe
Cast: Daniel Kaluuya, Bokeem Woodbine, Jodie Turner-Smith
Plot: A couple’s first date takes an unexpected turn when a police officer pulls them over.

“The Souvenir” (A24 – May 17)
Writer/Director: Joanna Hogg
Cast: Tilda Swinton, Honor Swinton-Byrne, Tom Burke, Richard Ayoade
Plot: A film student in the early 1980s becomes romantically involved with a complicated and untrustworthy man.

[ click to read complete list of contenders at Gold Derby ]

Posted on March 11, 2019 by Editor

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Beatdown At The Bell

from CBS Philly

Watch: 6 Taco Bell Employees Beat Up Man And His Girlfriend Outside Center City Location

By Greg Argos

PHILADELPHIA (CBS) — A Taco Bell beatdown was captured on video. Taco Bell is taking action but the criminal investigation is just getting started.

Bryan Reese is the guy in blue on the ground. Video shows six people wearing Taco Bell uniforms surrounding him, one holding him down as the others serve up punches to his side.

After he gets up, the employees then deliver blows to his girlfriend Ali’s face.

It all happened on Chestnut Street near 10th, in front of the Center City location.

“I just stopped by the Taco Bell to pick some friends up who were getting food at the end of the night,” Reese said.

[ click to continue reading at CBS Philly ]

Posted on March 10, 2019 by Editor

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The Famous Joey Ryan Penis Flip

Posted on March 9, 2019 by Editor

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Ted Bundy Lives

from AP

Bundy’s deadly charm still polarizes, 40 years later

By DAN SEWELL

CINCINNATI (AP) — She kept her eyes on the dapper, wavy haired man who smiled, winked and exuded self-confidence as the courtroom proceedings moved along.

“I don’t know what it is he has, but he’s fascinating,” the teenage spectator explained to me at the time. “He’s impressive. He just has a kind of magnetism.”

It was that beguiling magnetism that investigators said helped make the object of her interest — Ted Bundy — one of the nation’s most prolific serial killers, with at least 30 women and girls’ deaths linked to him in a multiple-state spree that spanned the late 1970s.

I reported the teenager’s comments for The Associated Press’ coverage of Bundy’s 1979 murder trial in Miami, the first of two murder trials he would have in Florida. She was just one example of a regular courtroom backdrop of spellbound female spectators who were “attractive, young and single,” as I wrote at the time, just like the women Bundy was on trial for bludgeoning and sexually assaulting.

[ click to continue reading at AP ]

Posted on March 8, 2019 by Editor

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King Kong Bundy Gone

from Fox News

WWE legend King Kong Bundy dies at 61

By Ryan Gaydos

Former WWE legend King Kong Bundy has died, the wrestling company announced Tuesday. He was 61.

The New Jersey native, whose real name is Christopher Pallies, was known for his enormous stature inside the ring. He was 6-foot-4 and weighed 458 pounds. People called him the “walking condominium.”

One of his biggest moments in WWE was wrestling Hulk Hogan for the title at Wrestlemania 2. He would leave WWE in the 1980s only to return once more as part of The Million Dollar Corporation faction in 1994 before he left the company a year later.

[ click to continue reading at Fox News ]

Posted on March 7, 2019 by Editor

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Keith Flint Gone

from The Sun

Keith Flint ‘suicide’ – The Prodigy legend famed for Firestarter and wild haircut dead after ‘taking his own life’ aged 49

The iconic singer, from Essex, was found dead at his home after police and paramedics were called at around 8am this morning

By Richard Wheatstone

THE Prodigy’s Keith Flint has been found dead in a suspected suicide at his home, aged 49.

The iconic Essex singer was discovered at around 8am this morning after police and paramedics were called to the property.

Officers remain outside the £1.5m rural home this afternoon but his death is not being treated as suspicious.

The Prodigy’s co-founder Liam Howlett said Keith Flint had ‘taken his own life’.

Famed for his devil-horns haircut and intense stage performances – the iconic 90s musician was performing just last month in New Zealand on a world tour set to run until May.

The Essex boy, who once dated Gail Porter, was the face of the rave band and took centre stage on their best-known hit Firestarter, the single which launched him as an icon.

[ click to continue reading at The Sun ]

Posted on March 6, 2019 by Editor

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Too Much Tequaraoke

Posted on March 5, 2019 by Editor

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Lena Waithe and The New Black Renaissance

from TIME Magazine

Hollywood’s New Black Renaissance Is Thriving. But the Industry Still Has Work to Do

By LENA WAITHE

Lena WaithePHOTO: ROGER ERICKSON / Courtesy of Chicago Magazine

What makes me optimistic today are the people trying to rip up what it means to be black and successful in Hollywood and rebuild it afresh. People like Terence Nance, the writer and director behind HBO’s Random Acts of Flyness. People like Dime Davis, who is directing four episodes of BET’s Boomerang, the TV version of a beloved movie that I’m producing. And people like Drew Michael, the stand-up comedian whose recent HBO special was almost like a therapy session; there was no audience hiding Drew and he was so vulnerable. That’s what art should be: aware of where the lines are, but coloring outside them.

Audiences are loving this new renaissance. They’re entertained, but they’re also educated. But my hope is that it no longer needs to be a renaissance, a moment or a movement. I want it to be the norm. It sometimes seems like people believe: “They have Black Panther, so they’re cool. Moonlight won best picture, so they’re good. They’ve got shows like Atlanta and Insecure, so they’re done.” But that’s not enough. White folks have everything, and we still have a lot of catching up to do. It’s too soon to be patting ourselves on the back like the problem is solved.

After all, the decision makers still don’t look like us. We’ve had a black person run the country, but never a big movie studio. Even though I’m making cool work, I still have to ask white people, “Is it OK? Do you like this enough? Do you understand this?” Until the big studio execs look like the rest of the world, that’s not going to change.

That said, people of color are a commodity right now. Every senior white executive is like: “Where’s my black TV show?” “Where’s my black Blockbuster?” And that’s awesome. But what we need is someone to be looking at it with a certain kind of intention. Don’t say, “Where’s my Insecure?” Ask, “Who’s the next Issa Rae?” Don’t say, “Where’s my Black Panther?” Ask, “Who’s the next Ryan Coogler?”

We need to find artists who are rebels—and usually the artists who are rebels aren’t the kind to raise their hands or promote themselves. We can’t count on the industry to find them. There are very few execs out there looking for the next stars and doing the roll-up-your-sleeves work of reading a bunch of scripts and talking to a lot of people to find who’s next. Until you’re hot, no one is seeking you out.

[ click to continue reading at TIME ]

Posted on March 4, 2019 by Editor

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Winter 1709

from National Geographic

Winter Is Coming: Europe’s Deep Freeze of 1709

In the first months of 1709, Europe froze and stayed that way for months. People ice-skated on the canals of Venice, church bells broke when rung, and travelers could cross the Baltic Sea on horseback. This freakish winter ultimately claimed the lives of a vast number of Europeans and disrupted two major wars—but to this day, there is no conclusive theory for its cause.

BY

IT HAPPENED LITERALLY overnight in the first few days of 1709. On January 5, temperatures plummeted—not, perhaps, a surprise in European winter. But 1709 was no ordinary cold snap. Dawn broke the next morning on a continent that had frozen over from Italy to Scandinavia and from England to Russia, and would not warm up again for the next three months. During the worst winter in 500 years, extreme cold followed by food shortages caused hundreds of thousands of deaths in France alone, froze lagoons in the Mediterranean, and changed the course of a war. Shivering in England, the scholar William Derham wrote: “I believe the Frost was greater … than any other within the Memory of Man.”

French Freeze

The country most affected by the terrible cold was undoubtedly France. The year 1709 had already started badly. French peasants had been hit by poor harvests, taxes, and conscription for the War of the Spanish Succession. The cold snaps of late 1708 were as nothing to the crash in temperatures that took place over the night of January 5 to 6. In the following two weeks, snow would fall and thermometers in France would drop to a low of -5°F.

In the absence of weather forecasting, the authorities had no time to prepare for what became known as “Le Grand Hiver,” and thousands succumbed to hypothermia before measures could be taken to help them. Animals were not spared either: Numerous livestock froze in their pens, barns, and coops.

[ click to continue reading at Nat Geo ]

Posted on March 3, 2019 by Editor

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Frieze LA Destroyed

from The Art Newspaper

Frieze LA diary: Leibovitz’s photo finish, Destroyer smashes it and a mushroom-powered rocket (doesn’t) take off

Plus, Suzanne Jackson’s modest gallery revival

MAXWELL WILLIAMS

Destroyer playing at the opening for Friedrich Kunath’s monograph, Sincerely Yours at Blum & Poe Photo: Max Williams

Destroyer smashes it at Blum & Poe

There’s a certain candor in Friedrich Kunath’s paintings, which often have text crossing lush, romantic landscapes like an aerial banner with no airplane, that pairs well with music. For the launch of his monograph, I Don’t Worry Anymore, which includes contributions from a substantial cast of characters—the poet Ariana Reines, the novelist James Frey, and the former tennis player-turned-art collector John McEnroe—Kunath invited the Canadian troubadour Daniel Bejar, aka Destroyer, to perform in front of one of those dreamy landscapes. The upstairs gallery at Blum & Poe was packed (whether there were more people there to support Kunath or to see Destroyer, we may never know) and Destroyer’s songs felt exactly right: romantic without being mawkish, funny without being inane. The musician and the painter were a pairing no DJ could have mixed better. “This is big for me,” said Kunath, who was a huge fan of the musician. Bejar played a mix of old and new songs while propped on a stool on top of a bear rug with a camel sculpture in front of him. “I want to thank Friedrich for letting me out tonight,” he joked. “It’s nice to get out of Canada once in a while.”

[ click to continue reading at The Art Newspaper ]

Posted on March 2, 2019 by Editor

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No Pads

Posted on March 1, 2019 by Editor

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America Afraid Of Penises

from Vice

French Director Gaspar Noé on America’s Fear of the Penis

“The fear of the penis in the United States still shocks me,” he said. “In many ways, the Western world is turning Victorian.”

By Noel Ransome

Near the end of my chat with Gaspar Noé, I ask him why he’s so comfortable with pushing narrative boundaries in film. He replied he doesn’t believe he’s pushing anything compared to what came before. So I remind him of cinema’s growing sensitivity to controversial representations of sexuality in 2019. The French director—whose latest film Climax (which is co-produced by VICE Studios), is a journey with a dance troupe lured into hallucinogenic states to the point of injury and death—decides to answer in the most Noé way possible.

“The fear of the penis in the United States still shocks me,” he lets out during a phone exchange. “In many ways, the Western world is turning Victorian.”

If you’ve ever seen a film by Gaspar Noé, it would be downright disappointing not to hear the word “penis” leave his mouth. The director is famed with his ability to unsettle viewers with equal parts beauty, sexuality and terror. You’ll see it in works such as Irreversible , Love, Enter the Void, and now in Climax set for a March 1 limited release—zero penises guaranteed.

It takes a special kind of mind to come up with films that explore the dark depths of the human psyche. And thankfully, I got a chance to listen to the ideas that a mind like that will throw at you when questioned. Whether it was drugs, directing or “the penis,” Noé was a man comfortable speaking about it all.

[ click to continue reading at Vice ]

Posted on February 28, 2019 by Editor

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Bring Back The Shit Stick!

from National Post

U.S. plush toilet paper use wiping out Canada’s forests, flushing away the future: report

The report gave failing grades to the leading toilet paper, tissue and paper towel brands for using only virgin fibre pulp, mostly from Canada’s old boreal forests

by Adrian Humphreys

The voracious use of toilet paper in the United States — with the average American using almost three rolls each week and major manufacturers spurning alternative fibres — is destroying Canada’s forests and causing widespread environmental damage, two international environmental groups say.

A report on tissue paper use gave failing grades to the leading toilet paper, tissue and paper towel brands for using only virgin fibre pulp, mostly from Canada’s old boreal forests.

“Forests are too vital to flush away,” says the report, called The Issue With Tissue, released Wednesday by Natural Resources Defense Council and Stand.earth, international nonprofit environmental organizations that cooperated on the study.

[ click to continue reading at National Post ]

Posted on February 26, 2019 by Editor

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Always Have An Off-site, Air-gapped Backup

from Fast Company

Humanity’s 30-million-page backup plan is heading to the moon

BY MELISSA LOCKER

When SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket took off on Thursday night, it carried humanity’s entire backup plan with it. It was headed to the moon, the world’s ultimate cold-storage unit.

The Arch Mission Foundation (AMF) created the Lunar Library, a 30-million-page long compendium of humanity’s greatest cultural offerings, encoded it on a specially designed disc meant to last a billion years, and sent it to the moon to keep it safe. The disc is being carried to its final resting place on the moon’s surface aboard Beresheet, the Israeli spacecraft (and Google Lunar XPrize contender) that was carried to space by the Falcon 9, CNET reports.

The Lunar Library contains a vast archive of human history and civilization, covering all subjects, cultures, nations, languages, genres, and time periods. Everything from the contents of Wikipedia, to a compilation of human languages, the Rosetta Project, books selected by Project Gutenberg, as well as genome maps, 60,000 analog images of pages of books, photographs, illustrations, and documents, and much of the world’s greatest art, music, literature, and scientific knowledge. It’s all encoded on a disc that is composed of 25 nickel discs, each only 40 microns thick, made for the AMF by NanoArchival.

[ click to continue reading at Fast Company ]

Posted on February 25, 2019 by Editor

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Warhol Still More Famous Than Brady

Posted on February 24, 2019 by Editor

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Cassettes Still Rock (and hiss)

from The Guardian

It’s cool to spool again as the cassette returns on a wave of nostalgia

Sales are soaring and current stars are releasing tracks on the format… but is anyone actually listening to them?

by Nosheen Iqbal

Pause. Stop. Rewind! The cassette, long consigned to the bargain bin of musical history, is staging a humble comeback. Sales have soared in the last year – up 125% in 2018 on the year before – amounting to more than 50,000 cassette albums bought in the UK, the highest volume in 15 years.

It’s quite a fall from the format’s peak in 1989 when 83 million cassettes were bought by British music fans, but when everyone from pop superstar Ariana Grande to punk duo Sleaford Mods are taking to tape, a mini revival seems afoot. But why?

“It’s the tangibility of having this collectible format and a way to play music that isn’t just a stream or download,” says techno DJ Phin, who has just released her first EP on cassette as label boss of Theory of Yesterday.

“I find them much more attractive than CDs. Tapes have a lifespan, and unlike digital music, there is decay and death. It’s like a living thing and that appeals to me.” Phin left the bulk of her own 100-strong cassette collection in Turkey, carefully stored at her parents’ home, but bought “20 or 25 really special ones” when she moved to London. “I’m from that generation,” she says. “It’s a nostalgia thing – I like the hiss.”

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on February 23, 2019 by Editor

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Social Media Boys

Posted on February 22, 2019 by Editor

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Dragon Aurora

from The Metro

Nasa releases picture of mysterious ‘dragon’ aurora rearing its head in the sky

by Jasper Hamill

A view0 of the mysterious dragon aurora snapped in Iceland on February 18 (Photo: Jingyi Zhang & Wang Zheng)

NASA has released incredible pictures of an unusual ‘dragon’ aurora roaring silently in the sky over Iceland.

The stunning natural wonder was caused by particles emited from the sun which smash into the atmosphere to cause a dramatic light display.

Nasa wrote: ‘Have you ever seen a dragon in the sky? Although real flying dragons don’t exist, a huge dragon-shaped aurora developed in the sky over Iceland earlier this month.

‘The aurora was caused by a hole in the Sun’s corona that expelled charged particles into a solar wind that followed a changing interplanetary magnetic field to Earth’s magnetosphere.

‘As some of those particles then struck Earth’s atmosphere, they excited atoms which subsequently emitted light: aurora.

‘This iconic display was so enthralling that the photographer’s mother ran out to see it and was captured in the foreground.

[ click to continue reading at Metro ]

Posted on February 21, 2019 by Editor

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Wi-Fi For The Brain

from Science Alert

Neuroscientists Say They’ve Found an Entirely New Form of Neural Communication

by PETER DOCKRILL

Scientists think they’ve identified a previously unknown form of neural communication that self-propagates across brain tissue, and can leap wirelessly from neurons in one section of brain tissue to another – even if they’ve been surgically severed.

The discovery offers some radical new insights about the way neurons might be talking to one another, via a mysterious process unrelated to conventionally understood mechanisms, such as synaptic transmission, axonal transport, and gap junction connections.

“We don’t know yet the ‘So what?’ part of this discovery entirely,” says neural and biomedical engineer Dominique Durand from Case Western Reserve University.

“But we do know that this seems to be an entirely new form of communication in the brain, so we are very excited about this.”

[ click to continue reading at Science Alert ]

Posted on February 20, 2019 by Editor

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Lagerfeld Gone

from Vogue

Legendary Designer Karl Lagerfeld Has Died

Karl Lagerfeld.Karl Lagerfeld / Photographed by Annie Leibovitz, Vogue, September 2018

Karl Lagerfeld, one of the most prolific and widely popular designers of the 20th and 21st centuries, has died in Paris. He was 85.

Lagerfeld was creative director of Chanel, the French house founded by Gabrielle Chanel, for an era-defining, age-defying 36 years. Upon assuming the reins in 1983, Lagerfeld swiftly revived Chanel, reinterpreting the house founder’s iconic tweed skirtsuits, little black dresses, and quilted handbags. He did it via the lens of hip-hop one season and California surfer chicks the next—he was a pop culture savant—without ever forgetting what the revolutionary Coco stood for: independence, freedom, and modernity.

In more recent years, as the company’s fortunes grew and grew, Lagerfeld became known for the lavish Grand Palais sets he conceived for the six Chanel collections he designed a year. There was a rocket ship, a reproduction of the Eiffel Tower, and a supermarché stocked strictly with Chanel-brand products. Florence Welch sang on the half-shell at the Spring 2012 show. Most memorable of all was the improbable giant iceberg from Scandinavia that Chanel shipped across the continent for the Fall 2010 show. Lagerfeld also pioneered the concept of the traveling pre-season show. The Karl caravan has landed variously in Versailles; West Lothian, Scotland; Dallas; Seoul; and, spectacularly, Havana, Cuba.

[ click to continue reading at Vogue ]

Posted on February 19, 2019 by Editor

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LORDS OF CHAOS, Mayhem Dissed

from The Telegraph

Call for Lords of Chaos film about suicide and satanism to be banned

by  Charles Hymas

One of the most controversial films ever made has been approved for release in the UK despite featuring self-harm, suicide and burning of churches by members of a satanic black metal band.

Official film classifiers in the UK and US are understood to have been so concerned about the release of Lords of Chaos that it was reviewed at the highest levels.

Church groups have, however, called for it to be banned following controversy over the role of online self-harm images in the death of Molly Russell, 14, who took her own life after viewing such images on Instagram.

The film, based on the real-life Norwegian black metal band Mayhem,contains explicit violence, including two murders and the burning…

Posted on February 18, 2019 by Editor

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Motility Re-dated

from Phys.org

Discovery of the oldest evidence of motility on Earth

 

Discovery of the oldest evidence of mobility on EarthPreviously, the oldest traces of this kind found dated to approximately 600 million years ago: the Ediacaran period, also characterized by a peak in dioxygen and a proliferation in biodiversity. Scale bar: 1 cm. Credit: A. El Albani / IC2MP / CNRS – Université de Poitiers

An international multi-disciplinary team coordinated by Abderrazak El Albani at the Institut de chimie des milieux et matériaux de Poitiers (CNRS/Université de Poitiers) has uncovered the oldest fossilised traces of motility. Whereas previous remnants were dated to 570 million years ago, this new evidence is 2.1 billion years old. The fossils were discovered in a deposit in Gabon, where the oldest multicellular organisms were found. The results appear in the 11 February 2019 edition of PNAS.

A few years ago, geologist Abderrazak El Albani and his team at the Institut de chimie des milieux et matériaux de Poitiers (CNRS/Université de Poitiers) discovered the oldest existing fossils of multicellular organisms in a deposit in Gabon. Located in the Franceville Basin, the deposit allowed scientists to re-date the appearance of multicellular life on Earth to 2.1 billion years—approximately 1.5 billion years earlier than previously thought (600 million). At the time, the researchers showed that this rich biodiversity co-occurred with a peak in dioxygenation of the atmosphere, and developed in a calm and shallow marine environment.

In this same geological deposit, the team has now uncovered the existence of fossilised traces of motility. This shows that certain multicellular organisms in this primitive marine ecosystem were sophisticated enough to move through its mud, rich in organic matter.

[ click to continue reading at physical.org ]

Posted on February 17, 2019 by Editor

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Nippy Hot Rod Tractors

from Somerset Live

Police impound tractor after it was reported for drag racing motorbikes

‘Pretty nippy’ tractor weighs around 5.5 tonnes and has up to 175hp

By Thomas Cock

Police in Wiltshire seized a five-tonne tractor after being told it was racing against motorbikes.

By their own admission, police in Amesbury said pulling over a tractor for allegedly racing was an “unusual” operation.

The farm vehicle was impounded after it was found to be using red diesel – duty free fuel only to be used for agricultural purposes.

Police also said the driver could not produce valid insurance at the time.

They tweeted a picture showing a New Holland T6 175 tractor.

This model is listed online as having up to 175hp and weighing around 5.5.tonnes.

One twitter used described it as “pretty nippy.”

The tractor had a large sticker on it saying “seized by police – no insurance”.

[ click to continue reading at Somerset Live ]

Posted on February 16, 2019 by Editor

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God Bless Testosterone

from ABC 7 Detroit

Local powerlifter lifts vehicle off man trapped underneath after accident

By: Alan Campbell

YPSILANTI, Mich. (WXYZ) — A local power lifter is being hailed as a real life super hero, after his quick actions helped save a man pinned under a rolled over vehicle.

Ryan Belcher, works out and trains at the gym 5 days a week. It’s his life, and a place he credits for giving him extra strength on a day he needed it the most.

“I just lifted and started pushing the vehicle as hard as I could,” Belcher said.

Belcher isn’t your normal power lifter.

“What’s weird is it’s easier for me to not know the weight,” he said.

It was around 4:30 Thursday afternoon when Belcher heard something outside his workplace on the 2600 block of Michigan Avenue in Ypsilanti.

“I just hear a big smash and, as I look out, a crowd of people are coming and this vehicle is flipped upside down and my first instinct was to just take off out there,” he said.

[ click to continue reading at ABC 7 Detroit ]

Posted on February 15, 2019 by Editor

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MAGMA

from The Express

Yellowstone volcano: How scientists ‘intensely monitor’ rising column of HOT MAGMA

THE YELLOWSTONE volcano has been “intensely monitored” by a team of scientists and volcanologists concerned by a 400-mile-long plume of hot magma that is rising beneath the surface of the Earth.

By CALLUM HOARE

The Yellowstone volcano has erupted three times in history – 2.1 million years ago, 1.2 million years ago and 640,000 years ago. Scientists have previously revealed that, should an earthquake occur, it could take less than two weeks before a catastrophic reaction event with the potential to wipe out three-quarters of the US is triggered. Now, it is the job of geologists to “intensely monitor” a large area of molten rock directly below the surface of the supervolcano, it was revealed in a documentary.

“We can reconstruct a 3D picture like an MRI scan by recording thousands of earthquakes.”

The documentary then reveals how the mapping system of more than 150 seismometers has identified a 400-mile-long magma plume rising from the Earth’s core.

Should this reach the surface, there could be catastrophic effects.

The last eruption of Yellowstone produced around 2,500 times more volcanic material than the 1980 eruption of Mount St Helens.

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Posted on February 14, 2019 by Editor

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Little Sis I Got Your Back

Posted on February 13, 2019 by Editor

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Steamboat Coming

from Travel Breaking News

Yellowstone’s Steamboat Geyser Is Gushing at a Record Pace

YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. — Late last year, Jeff Carter happened upon Steamboat Geyser, the tallest active geyser in the world, just before it erupted. “It was so much louder, and higher and stronger than anything I had seen, almost frightening,” he said. “People around us were so emotional, just cheering and roaring,” Mr. Carter said. “This old fellow who had it on his bucket list was so verklempt when the geyser erupted, it was neat.” All but dormant for years, Steamboat is erupting fairly frequently these days and more people like Mr. Carter are getting to witness it.

While Old Faithful is a global icon of punctual eruption — it usually erupts every 90 minutes or so — it is the exception among geothermal features. Most of Yellowstone National Park’s 1,000 or so geysers are far more irregular and unpredictable. Many geysers, like Steamboat, are quiet and then suddenly rouse. Steamboat sometimes jets water to heights of 300 to 400 feet — far higher than Old Faithful’s top height of 185 feet…

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Posted on February 12, 2019 by Editor

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