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Baba Booey Gone

from USA Today

Joey Boots from ‘Howard Stern Show’ dies at 49

by 

(Photo: Jamie McCarthy)

Joey Boots, who helped introduce America to the expression “Baba Booey” on The Howard Stern Show, has died at 49.

The radio personality, whose real surname is Bassolino, was found unresponsive in his Bronx apartment Friday, report TMZ and  CNN.

The NYPD later confirmed his death to the Hollywood Reporter.

Bassolino, who was part of the rogue’s gallery known as the Wack Pack, grabbed attention by shouting “Baba Booey” on Stern’s show and during live TV reports. He even managed to successfully defend his right to do so in a New York court.

[ click to continue reading at USAT ]

Posted on December 26, 2016 by Editor

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“Most” Influential Album Covers

from American Express

The 57 Most Influential Album Covers

[ click to view all 57 covers at AmEx ]

Posted on December 25, 2016 by Editor

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Bowie’s Basquiats

from artnet

What David Bowie’s Basquiat Painting Teaches Us About the Art Market

The painting has come to auction twice before, with illuminating results.

Brian Boucher

Jean-Michel Basquiat, Air Power (1984), from the collection of David Bowie. Courtesy Sotheby's London.Jean-Michel Basquiat, Air Power (1984), from the collection of David Bowie. Courtesy Sotheby’s London.

The holdings of pop superstar, art collector, and artist David Bowie are headed to auction November 10 at Sotheby’s London, and the prize lot is a canvas by Jean-Michel Basquiat, titled Air Power (1984). It is estimated to sell for as much as £3.5 million ($4.3 million).

Showing a grimacing, full-length figure at the left and a masklike face at the center above a hatchet, among other imagery, the painting stands five and a half feet high; it has been exhibited in public just three times.

The painting has come to auction twice before, according to the artnet Price Database, and the ups and downs in its price might offer a lesson about holding on to prized works. Even as today’s art market has softened, this painting’s story may make you want to take the long view.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on December 23, 2016 by Editor

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Hollywood Babylgun

from The Hollywood Reporter

LOCKED & LOADED: The Gun Industry’s Lucrative Relationship With Hollywood

By Gary Baum & Scott Johnson

The NRA and the entertainment industry interact publicly as mortal enemies. But as the number of weapons shown in movies and TV steadily increases — and stars like Matt Damon and Angelina Jolie make fortunes wielding guns onscreen — a co-dependence that keeps both churning is revealed: “making the liberal bias a lot of money”

BURNISHED BY THE LOW LIGHT OF GLASS-WALLED DISPLAYS, THEY seem like ancient artifacts, but the objects here are beloved contemporary icons. One case houses the massive Smith & Wesson Model 29 wielded by Clint Eastwood’s “Dirty Harry” Callahan in the 1973 film Magnum Force. In another rests the Beretta 92F used by Bruce Willis in Die Hard. All the great shoot-’em-up classics — The Bourne IdentityPulp FictionThe Wild Bunch — are here. This exhibit, celebrating cinema, isn’t in Hollywood; it’s thousands of miles away, in a museum at the headquarters of the National Rifle Association in Fairfax, Va.

The NRA is proud of its “Hollywood Guns” exhibit. It’s the most popular of more than a dozen rooms and multiple showcases, which include the gun that Theodore Roosevelt took on a 1913 expedition to the Amazon. The shiny allure of the Hollywood gun room comes last in the museum tour — “like a reward,” says an NRA official.

The exhibit highlights the sometimes uneasy but fruitful partnership between the gun industry and Hollywood, where firearms are an integral part of life and storytelling. Meanwhile, gun manufacturers say that there’s no better way to brand, market and sell a weapon than to get it placed in a big Hollywood production. And most of the time, it’s free — product placement at its finest.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on December 22, 2016 by Editor

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Lyndsy Fonseca to “THE HAUNTED”

from Deadline

‘The Haunted’: Lyndsy Fonseca To Star In Syfy Pilot, Elizabeth Cappuccino Also Set

by 

lyndsy-fonseca-3Courtesy of Syfy

Former Nikita star Lyndsy Fonseca and up-and-comer Elizabeth Cappuccino (Jessica Jones) have been cast as two of the leads of Syfy’s supernatural horror drama pilot The Haunted.

Written by Noga Landau (Tau, The Magicians)The Haunted centers on four siblings – Juno (Fonseca), Virgil, Eliis and Hester (Cappuccino) — who reunite following their parents’ deaths. As they try to overcome their fractured personal relationships they find that they must also face the literal ghosts from their past in order to survive.

James Frey and Todd Cohen of Full Fathom Five executive produce and Landau co-executive produces for Universal Cable Productions.

[ click to read full article at Deadline.com ]

Posted on December 19, 2016 by Editor

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Alogrithm X

from BBC

Algorithms Are Making Us Small-minded

Your life is mapped out for you but, not in the way that you think. How predictive algorithms narrow your perspective – and ultimately your choices.

By Sydney Finkelstein

(Credit: Getty Images)Online retailers like Amazon offer us products based on our previous browsing habits – but that can add to the echo chamber (Credit: Getty Images)

We live in a world of curation. The internet — aided by algorithms that predict what we search, buy, listen to, read, watch and even who we want to date and marry — expertly helps to us find what we want.

Well, as long as it’s similar to whatever we’ve liked in the past.

And there’s the rub. The ubiquity of incredibly powerful algorithms designed to reinforce our interests also ensures that we see little of what’s new, different and unfamiliar. The very things that are at the heart of learning, understanding and innovation. Rather than taking us out of our comfort zone, the digital revolution is enabling each of us to live happily in our own worlds, and in the process closing down opportunities for originality, spontaneity and learning.

The best part of all: we love it this way.

How do I know?

Because we flock to Amazon to buy what their algorithms say we should buy. Because we read news that reinforces what we already believe. And because we even rely on dating sites that specifically seek to match us with similar people.

[ click to continue reading at BBC ]

Posted on December 18, 2016 by Editor

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Henry Heimlich Gone

from The LA Times

Henry Heimlich, doctor who invented lifesaving anti-choking procedure, dies at 96

by Steve Chawkins

When he was a 21-year-old camp counselor, Henry Heimlich saved a life and had his first brush with fame.

On the way back to New York City from Massachusetts at summer’s end, his quick thinking in a train wreck helped save a critically wounded crew member. It also landed the handsome medical student on the front page of the New York Times. A month later, the Greater New York Safety Council gave him a gold watch.

Never one to shy away from the limelight, Heimlich would go on to a level of fame — and controversy — that astonished even him.

Heimlich, a thoracic surgeon who developed the lifesaving Heimlich maneuver after experimenting on anesthetized beagles, died Saturday in Cincinnati, his family said. He was 96.

[ click to continue reading at LA Times ]

Posted on December 17, 2016 by Editor

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National Asteroid Day decreed by QUEEN

from PASTE

Thanks to Queen’s Brian May, We Now Have “International Asteroid Day”

By Monica Hunter-Hart

ad30

The fact that an asteroid could easily and suddenly obliterate Earth is something people usually try not to think about. But Queen guitarist and astrophysicist Brian May would caution against blissful disregard; thanks to him and three co-founders, the U.N. Committee On The Peaceful Uses Of Outer Space have approved an annual awareness campaign in the form of “International Asteroid Day.”

In regards to this cosmic threat, May has stated, “The more we learn about asteroid impacts, the clearer it became that the human race has been living on borrowed time.” He added that asteroids hit Earth “all the time.”

[ click to continue reading at PASTE ]

Posted on December 12, 2016 by Editor

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The Miracle Of The Can

Posted on December 11, 2016 by Editor

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Rocket Men

from The Guardian

Rocket men: why tech’s biggest billionaires want their place in space

Forget gilded mansions and super yachts. Among the tech elite, space exploration is now the ultimate status symbol

by  in San Francisco

Richard Branson with a Virgin Galactic space aircraft at the company’s Mojave desert headquarters.Richard Branson with a Virgin Galactic space aircraft at the company’s Mojave desert headquarters. Photograph: Barry J Holmes for the Observer

The explosion could be felt 30 miles away. At 9.07am on 1 September, a SpaceX rocket containing 75,000 gallons of liquid oxygen and rocket-grade kerosene ignited into a fireball that could be seen from orbit, billowing black smoke into the gray sky around its Cape Canaveral launch pad.

On board was a $200m, 12,000lb communications satellite – part of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s Internet.org project to deliver broadband access to sub-Saharan Africa.

Zuckerberg wrote, with a note of bitterness, on his Facebook page that he was “deeply disappointed to hear that SpaceX’s launch failure destroyed our satellite”. SpaceX founder Elon Musk told CNN it was the “most difficult and complex failure” the 14-year-old company had ever experienced.

It was also the second dramatic explosion in nine months for SpaceX, following a “rapid unscheduled disassembly” of a booster rocket as it attempted to land after a successful mission to the International Space Station.

Later that day, Nasa’s official Twitter account responded: “Today’s @SpaceX incident – while not a Nasa launch – reminds us that spaceflight is challenging.”

Yet despite those challenges, a small band of billionaire technocrats have spent the past few years investing hundreds of millions of dollars into space ventures. Forget gilded mansions and super yachts; among the tech elite, space exploration is the ultimate status symbol.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on December 5, 2016 by Editor

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DRY Revived

from Dangerous Minds

THE ENTIRE PRINT RUN (1979-82) OF NYC PUNK MAGAZINE ‘DRY’ IS NOW ONLINE!

by Christopher Bickel

Wendy O Williams of the Plasmatics in ‘Dry’ magazine

Ryan Richardson is one of the United States’ foremost collectors, archivists, and dealers of punk rock records and ephemera, as well as being the Internet saint who created free online archives of Star,  Rock Scene, and Slash magazines. He also runs Fanzinefaves.com, a repository of various early punk zines as well as the exhaustive punk info blog Break My Face.

We’ve written about Richardson’s punk altruism before here at Dangerous Minds. The last time was back in June when he uploaded the entire print run of excellent early San Francisco punk magazine Damage over at his site CirculationZero.com.

Richardson has done his Good Samaritan work once again, this time with the upload of the complete print run of the late ‘70s/early ‘80s NYC punk magazine Dry to Circulation Zero.

According to Richardson, Dry was conceived by art school students and titled as a reaction against Wet, “The Magazine of Gourmet Bathing.”

Dry is manic in its cut-n-paste layout and panicked in its reviews and reports. Eclectic coverage of punk, No Wave and eventually hardcore in the later installments.

Fourteen issues were published, all of which are available as a single pdf download HERE.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on December 4, 2016 by Editor

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Moon Village Coming

from The Belfast Telegraph

‘Moon village’ plans winning worldwide support

Futuristic plans for a “moon village” proposed by the European Space Agency (Esa) are winning support from around the world.

The idea is to set up a permanent human outpost on the moon that will be a base for science, business, mining and even tourism.

Esa director general Jan Woerner said the moon village was discussed by member state ministers meeting in Lucerne, Switzerland to decide space funding.

At a press conference after the two-day meeting he said: “We are now having a list of actors worldwide who would like to participate in this moon village concept.

“There are ideas of companies – not only ideas, projects of companies – to go to the moon, and they want to be part of this community.

[ click to continue reading at The Belfast Telegraph ]

Posted on December 3, 2016 by Editor

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Inventor of General Tso’s Chicken Gone

from Taiwan News

Inventor of General Tso’s Chicken dies in Taipei at age 98

The inventor of General Tso’s Chicken and founder of famous Taiwanese Hunan-style restaurant chain Peng’s Garden died in Taipei on Wednesday

By Keoni Everington

General Tso’s Chicken(By Wikimedia Commons)<

Chef Peng Chang-kuei (彭長貴), the founder of the famous Hunan-style restaurant chain Peng’s Garden Hunan Restaurant (彭園湘菜館) and inventor of the world famous Chinese dish General Tso’s Chicken, died on Nov. 30 at the age of 98 from Pneumonia.

A native of Changsha, Hunan Province, Peng began training at the age of 13 under the tutelage of the famous Hunan chef Cao Jing-chen (曹藎臣), who was the family chef of Tan Yan-kai (譚延闓), the prime minister of the Nationalist government from 1926 to 1928. After WWII, he was put in charge of running Nationalist government banquets, and in 1949 he fled to Taiwan after the Kuomintang’s forces were defeated by the communists in the Chinese Civil War.

According to an interview with the China Times, Peng says that his most famous dish was created in 1952 during a four-day visit by U.S. Seventh Fleet commander Admiral Arthur W. Radford. After three days, he had served the guests most of his repertoire of dishes, so to try and mix things up a bit, he decided to chop some chicken into big chunks, fry it to a golden hue and then added a different combination of sauce and seasoning to create a new dish.

The admiral was so impressed with the dish that he asked Peng what it was called, he thought quickly on his feet and said “General Tso’s Chicken” (左宗棠雞).

[ click to continue reading at Taiwan News ]

Posted on December 2, 2016 by Editor

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The Farmer’s Daughter

from LAist

How A Seedy Motel Called The Farmer’s Daughter Became A Boutique Hotel

BY JULIET BENNETT RYLAH

flying-bacon.jpeg“Flying Bacon” by Jessie Azzarin (Photo via Farmer’s Daughter Hotel)

The farmer’s daughter, in fiction, is an attractive, pure-hearted young woman who grew up on a bucolic farm. She’s Daisy Duke. She’s Dolores Abernathy of Westworld. She’s Mary Ann, stranded on an uncharted desert isle. Technically, she’s even The Walking Dead‘s Maggie Greene. She appears in songs, she’s a central character in crass tavern jokes, and she turns up in many an adult film. But in Los Angeles, Farmer’s Daughter is also a hotel.Peter and Ellen Picataggio bought the Farmer’s Daughter Hotel on Fairfax Avenue in 1997. At that time, Ellen said it already bore its peculiar name, but it was something of a “no-tell motel.” It’d been there since the ’60s, had its halcyon days through the ’70s, and fell into disarray thereafter. For a short period of time, it was a Best Western, but not when the Picataggios got their hands on it. Ellen described the owner they got the property from as “absentee.”

Looking at old photos supplied by the Picataggios reveals the kind of unremarkable, bland, yet oddly endearing decor of any mediocre American motel. The off-white bathroom with the hair dryer attached to the wall, the small closet stacked with unused phonebooks, the green carpeting you rarely see outside of motels and dated transit hubs, and the plain bed, dressed in pink and green patterned comforters, positioned beneath uninspired paintings of ambiguous landscapes. These pedestrian rooms served as the accommodation for many a CBS studio guest, including those who went to sleep dreaming of spinning The Big Wheel and winning a lump sum from Bob Barker. The sign was a big, yellow roadside eye-catcher, with a smaller marquee below that read, “Our Rooms Are Tops” on one side and “Extra Nice Rooms” on the other.

“Gotta love the cheap art on the wall,” Peter said of the old rooms. “I think I might have kept a piece somewhere just for fun and memories. Never forget where you came from.”

The original yellow sign, too, is now a part of the hotel’s office.

[ click to continue reading at LAist.com ]

Posted on December 1, 2016 by Editor

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Inventor of Big Mac Gone

from FORTUNE

The Inventor of the Big Mac Has Died

by 

Michael Delligatti, the man who brought you the Big Mac, has died. He was 98.

Delligatti, more affectionately known as “Jim,” was one of McDonald’s first franchisees. He first created the Big Mac in 1967 at his Uniontown, Penn. restaurant, Business Insider reports.

Almost 50 years later, it’s the same recipe served in chains today: two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions—on a sesame seed bun (for those of you old enough to remember the jingle). McDonald’s has been experimenting with the Big Mac’s size lately, offering both smaller and bigger versions of the sandwich.

[ click to continue reading at FORTUNE ]

Posted on November 30, 2016 by Editor

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AC/DC Live 1978


AC/DC Live in UK 1977 – 1978 Essex, Colchester… by alexandr-krepyshew

Posted on November 29, 2016 by Editor

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The Little Man In The Boat Has Really Long Legs

from sex & privilege

The Little Man In The Boat: How History Hates The Clitoris

by 

What’s up, labia flaps. Today we’re talking about how everyone hates the clitoris and its surrounding sex organs. Or more specifically how all throughout history the sexuality of clit-owning people and their sex organs have been ignored because apparently those things scare people.

The clitoris (“clit,” “love button,” “bean,” “little man in the boat,” etc.) is that super fun little thing by the vaginal opening that has 8,000 sensory nerve endings. Wow wow wee wow, that’s a lot of feels.

If you have a vulva (the external genital organs—not to be confused with the vagina, which is the slippery inside tunnel-bit) then you should grab a mirror and check yourself out! Find your clit, poke around and find your urethral opening. You should know what your bits look like! And be proud of them!

[ click to continue reading at sex&privilege ]

Posted on November 28, 2016 by Editor

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Freddie Mercury Unmasked

from Rolling Stone

Freddie Mercury: 10 Things You Didn’t Know Queen Singer Did

From sneaking Lady Di into a gay club to concealing his final resting place, read lesser-known tales of vocal legend’s life

By Jordan Runtagh

“Lover of life, singer of songs.” The simple epitaph, penned by Queen bandmate Brian May, goes a long way in describing the complex figure known across the globe as Freddie Mercury. “To me that summed it up, because he lived life to the fullest,” remembered May in a BBC documentary. “He was a generous man, a kind man, an impatient man, sometimes. But utterly dedicated to what he felt was important, which was making music.”

Born Farrokh Bulsara in the British protectorate of Zanzibar, Freddie’s oversized talent was matched only by his flamboyance and exuberance. These qualities merged to create masterpieces of the group’s songbook, and some of the greatest live performances on record. In life, his four-octave voice – since studied by scientists in an attempt to unlock the secrets of its intricacies and awesomeness – raised the bar for what a rock singer could be. In death, he gave voice to the millions suffering from AIDS.

In honor of the 25th anniversary of his passing, here are some lesser-known elements of Mercury’s incredible legacy.

[ click to continue reading at Rolling Stone ]

Posted on November 26, 2016 by Editor

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Giant Robot Panda

Posted on November 25, 2016 by Editor

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Sharon Jones Gone

from NPR

A Queen Among Kings

Sharon Jones’ Soul Was Surpassed Only By Her Spirit

by 

The first time I ever saw Sharon Jones and the Dap-Kings perform was circa 2002 at the Elbo Room, a tiny venue in San Francisco’s Mission District. If you’ve ever been there, you know the Elbo Room doesn’t need many bodies to pack the floor, and with the Dap-Kings crowding the diminutive stage, the full intensity of their act filled the space from practically the first note. I was already familiar with the group through its early records, but hadn’t fully appreciated how much power Jones could pack into her stout, 5-foot frame as she sang, sweated, stamped, strutted, slayed.

Jones, who passed away last week after a long, public battle with pancreatic cancer, enjoyed one of the great second acts of American pop music history, one whose countless retellings never seems to diminish its wonder. She was born in Augusta, Ga., in the mid-1950s, which made her just a little too young to have made a go at a soul career in the heyday of the 1960s and early ’70s. The closest she got was at age 17, singing backup on tour with Long Island R&B girl group The Magic Touch. Fast forward 20 years and Jones was working as a corrections officer out of Rikers Island prison while moonlighting as a wedding singer on the weekends.

[ click to continue reading at NPR ]

Posted on November 21, 2016 by Editor

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Secrets of Blackstar

from SPIN

David Bowie’s Graphic Designer Says Blackstar Records Hold More Secrets

by Anna Gaca

david bowie blackstarCREDIT: Screenshot via DavidBowieVEVO on YouTube

In May, months after David Bowie released his final album  (Blackstar) and died unexpectedly, fans discovered a charming surprise: If you expose the record’s gatefold sleeve to light, it reveals an image of a galaxy. In an interview with BBC Radio 6 today, the record’s graphic designer, Jonathan Barnbrook, says that’s not all the records are hiding.

“There’s actually a few other things as well,” Barnbrook told host Mary Ann Hobbs. “Actually, there’s one big thing which people haven’t discovered yet on the album. Let’s just say, if people find it, they find it, and if they don’t, they don’t. And remember what Bowie said about not explaining everything.”

Of course, that doesn’t bring us any closer to discovering the secret, but at least we know to look. Personally, my guess is that Bowie might’ve built in some kind of stargazing aid. Listen to the relevant clip from Barnbrook’s interview here, and if you’ve found a big secret in your copy of , tell us at tips@spin.com.

[ click to continue reading at SPIN ]

Posted on November 18, 2016 by Editor

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$1 Million Worth of Hot Wheels

from Inside Hook

SO THAT’S WHAT A $1 MILLION HOT WHEELS COLLECTION LOOKS LIKE

Got a Pink VW Bus in the attic? Call your banker.

BY EVAN BLEIER

From Michael Jordan rookie cards to first-run issues of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, we’ve all heard horror stories of parents tossing out valuable collectibles during impromptu attic cleanses.

For Bruce Pascal, a real-estate agent who started collecting Hot Wheels in 1968 when he was seven, that was never an issue. You see, his folks also collect car-related items — in fact, they’ve got about 10,000 of ‘em.

Their love of cars allowed Pascal’s own love of Mattel miniatures to flourish, and he now has a Hot Wheels collection that numbers more than 5,000 pieces and is valued at more than $1 million.

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on November 17, 2016 by Editor

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Monkey Tools

from The Telegraph

Monkeys create stone tools forcing scientists to rethink human evolution

By 

Capuchin stone on stone percussion: an active hammerstone fragmenting during useCapuchin stone on stone percussion: an active hammerstone fragmenting during use CREDIT: M.HASLAM

The path of human evolution may need to be rewritten after archaeologists discovered that monkeys also produce ‘tool-like flakes’ that were thought to be uniquely man-made.In a discovery that calls into question decades of research, a band of wild bearded capuchin monkeys in Brazil were seen hammering rocks to extract minerals, causing large flakes to fly off.

Previously archaeologists believed the flakes were only made by humans through a process called ‘stone-knapping’ where a larger rock is hammered with another stone to produce sharp blade-like slivers which can be used for arrows, spears or knives.

The flakes were thought to represent a turning point in human evolution because they demonstrated a level of planning, cognition and hand manipulation that could not be achieved by other animals.

But the new research suggests that flakes can be made without any such foresight. In fact they can simply be made by accident.

[ click to continue reading at The Telegraph ]

Posted on November 15, 2016 by Editor

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Black Metal

from VICE

Photos That Perfectly Capture the Brutality of Extreme Norwegian Music

By Oliver Lunn, Photos: Jonas Bendiksen

Aleksander Ilievski from Imagination and Empty. Norway, 2016. (Copyright: Jonas Bendiksen / Magnum Photos)

The most Norwegian thing ever is black metal. Just hearing someone say “Norway” conjures up the image of a man-troll screaming in a dark cave and the ear-bleeding sound of double-kick drumming at hyper-speed. Which is hardly surprising, given that black metal is Norway’s largest musical export.

When I hear “Norway” I think of bands like Mayhem, Burzum, and Darkthrone; of the 1993 murder of Mayhem guitarist Euronymous by Burzum’s Varg Vikernes; and of the series of church burnings in which some of the bands were caught up. It’s been over 20 years since all that happened, and now black metal is more mainstream than ever.

That enduring association – between Norway and black metal – is what interested Magnum photographer Jonas Bendiksen, a Norwegian himself. For his new series “Singing Norwegian Singers”, commissioned by Leica, Bendiksen rounded up a bunch of local black metal singers and photographed them screaming directly into his lens. The shots are uncomfortably close: nostrils flare; saliva glistens on their tongues, everything captured in the cold glow of the camera flash.

[ click to continue reading at VICE ]

Posted on November 13, 2016 by Editor

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Leonard Cohen Gone

from Variety

Singer-Songwriter Leonard Cohen Dies at 82

by 

Leonard Cohen DeadDAVID ROWLAND/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Leonard Cohen, the Canadian poet and novelist who became a singular international presence as a singer-songwriter, has died. He was 82.

A statement on his official Facebook page read, “It is with profound sorrow we report that legendary poet, songwriter and artist, Leonard Cohen has passed away. We have lost one of music’s most revered and prolific visionaries. A memorial will take place in Los Angeles at a later date. The family requests privacy during their time of grief.”

Only last month, Cohen released his final album, “You Want It Darker,” a deeply introspective work that focused thematically on mortality.

His elegantly penned songs, authored during a musical career that spanned six decades, won him comparison with such other songwriters of his era as Bob Dylan and Paul Simon. His best-known song, “Hallelujah,” has been recorded more than 200 times. Cohen never recorded a chart single and didn’t place an album in the top 10 until he was in his 70s, but his ardent fans and musical peers viewed him as a musical craftsman with few equals.

As a songwriter, his themes encompassed love in all its manifestations, religion, faith and the tenuous state of the world. Like “Hallelujah,” many of his tunes — his breakthrough composition “Suzanne,” “Bird on the Wire,” “Tower of Song” — became much-covered keystones of the popular songbook. His longtime accompanist Jennifer Warnes recorded several of his best-known works on her 1987 Cohen recital “Famous Blue Raincoat.”

Like his art, his life evidenced a dynamic tension between sexuality and spirituality. He was a well-known womanizer whose many romantic partners included fellow Canadian musician Joni Mitchell and actress Rebecca De Mornay. Yet he would famously reject the world of the flesh: Torn by depression and doubt about his life and career, he withdrew to spend more than five years in a Buddhist monastery; he later studied at a Hindu ashram in Mumbai.

[ click to continue reading at Variety ]

Posted on November 10, 2016 by Editor

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Hackman The Assman

from Vulture

On the 30th Anniversary of Hoosiers, the Movie’s Director Recalls What a Pain Gene Hackman Was

By 

Gene Hackman in “Hoosiers” Photo: Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

The success and long afterlife of Hoosiers — released almost exactly 30 years ago and new on Hulu this month — may not be quite as improbable as the events depicted in the movie, but it’s in the same long-shot realm as Hickory High’s run to the Indiana state basketball title. You had a director, David Anspaugh, making his feature-film debut; you had a co-star, Dennis Hopper, who played the troubled assistant coach Shooter Flatch, still working his way back from a solid decade in the show-business wilderness; and you had a subject, basketball, that up to that point, didn’t exactly have a sterling cinematic history. Oh, and Gene Hackman, who starred as coach Norman Dale, drove Anspaugh to the brink of a nervous breakdown.

Yet those problems resulted in beloved film, one that earned Academy Award nominations for Dennis Hopper’s supporting role and composer Jerry Goldsmith’s score. In 2001, the movie was selected by preservation by the National Film Registry and has been honored by the American Film Institute. As far as sports films go, Hoosiers, despite criticism from the likes of Spike Lee, is in the pantheon.

Speaking on the phone from Bloomington, Indiana, where he moved in 2014 to teach film at Indiana University, Anspaugh, who also directed the football classic Rudy, talked about his movie’s legacy, butting heads with Hackman, an obsessive celebrity fan, race, and what Jack Nicholson said would’ve happened if he’d been the star.

[ click to continue reading at Vulture ]

Posted on November 8, 2016 by Editor

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Brown Sabbath

Posted on November 6, 2016 by Editor

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Earworms Explained

from The New York Times

What Lady Gaga’s ‘Bad Romance’ and Other Earworm Songs Have in Common

By  

You should stop reading this now. No really, just don’t. You’re still reading. O.K., you asked for it:

Rah rah ah-ah-ah!/ Ro mah ro-mah-mah!/ Gaga ooh-la-la!” 

There’s your “Bad Romance.” Like the “ugly” “disease” Lady Gaga sings about wanting in this song, an earworm has likely just lodged itself deep inside the auditory cortex of your brain. There it will sit, sucking up your precious brain energy, for the next hour, day, month or even a whole year. ( I had Hall and Oates’ “Maneater” in my head for most of 2005.)

You are not alone.

“That’s all I can really think about right now,” said Kelly Jakubowski, a music psychologist at Durham University in Britain, about “Bad Romance.” In a study published Thursday in Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts, she and her colleagues compiled lists of earworms from around 3,000 participants to see why some pop songs wiggle their way into people’s heads and stay there. The Lady Gaga hit, which is always at the top of people’s lists, has been developing its own toxic relationship inside the mind of Dr. Jakubowski, who hasn’t heard it in months: “It’s been persisting for two days straight,” she said.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on November 5, 2016 by Editor

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Robot Brothels Cool

from Mirror Online

Robot brothels could soon become reality in UK as nation’s booming sex trade undergoes revolution

BY RACHEL BISHOP

A man named Liu standing next to his high-end sex doll at his apartment in an industrial suburb of BeijingA high-end sex doll in an industrial suburb of Beijing

Sex robot brothels similar to those seen in Channel’s 4’s eerie cyborg drama Humans could soon become a reality in the UK, it has been claimed.

Rapidly-improving technology could herald a revolution in the UK’s sex industry which could result in reduced risk of sexually transmitted diseases and safer lives for I working girls, clients and pimps.

NUI Galway Law professor John Danaher, who has conducted research into human enhancement and artificial intelligence, said sex robots could be a good substitute for human prostitutes.

He told the Daily Star : “The cyborgs can cater for desire for sexual variety, freedom from constraint and complication and fear of lack of sexual success.

“Technology may become better at developing emotional bonds with their clients.

“They won’t need to ‘fake it’ the same way as human prostitutes.”

‘World’s most expensive’ sex dolls shown being put together in striking images

Mr Danaher said the “completely legal” practice could even even stamp out sexual slavery and trafficking as the robot’s would be cheaper than human prostitutes

[ click to continue reading at Mirror Online ]

Posted on November 1, 2016 by Editor

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TIME Magazine Promotes Consumption of Hallucinogenic Drugs

from TIME

LSD Might Make You More Creative

A small study of the illegal drug has found eye- and mind-opening results

Lysergic acid dyethylamide, which you probably know as LSD, has been put to various uses since its discovery in the 1930s: scientists have tried to treat mental illness; the CIA attempted to control minds; and recreational users, well, trip out. But the Controlled Substances Act of 1970 officially prohibited LSD, and scientific inquiries into its capabilities all but disappeared. Until recently.

While studies into LSD still face stigmas, in the past several years, scientists have found potential small-scale, fascinating effects on perplexing regions of health, including addiction, depression and terminal cancer. Studies have also taken on the drug’s cognitive repercussions; “You don’t recognize yourself as a separate being from the universe,” as one study’s co-author told TIME in 2015.\

[ click to continue reading at TIME ]

Posted on October 31, 2016 by Editor

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Laurel Canyon Legacy

from Vanity Fair

An Oral History of Laurel Canyon, the 60s and 70s Music Mecca

They made music together, took drugs together, formed bands together, slept together. But none of the legends of the Laurel Canyon scene that flowered in L.A. in the late 60s and early 70s—Joni Mitchell, David Crosby, Linda Ronstadt, and others—remember it quite the same way.

by 

Stephen Stills and Peter Tork in Stills’s Rolls-Royce, 1968. Digital Colorization by Lorna Clark; © Nurit Wilde.

Some say the Laurel Canyon music scene began when Frank Zappa moved to the corner of Lookout Mountain and Laurel Canyon Boulevard in the late 1960s. Former Byrds bassist Chris Hillman recalls writing “So You Want to Be a Rock ‘n’ Roll Star” in Laurel Canyon in 1966 in his house, on a steep winding street with a name he doesn’t remember. The Doors’ lead singer Jim Morrison reportedly wrote “Love Street” while living behind the Laurel Canyon Country Store. Michelle Phillips lived with John Phillips on Lookout Mountain in 1965 during the Mamas and the Papas’ heyday. Books and documentaries have mythologized and romanticized this woodsy canyon nestled behind Sunset Boulevard in the Hollywood Hills. Still, misconceptions continue.

For a start, the scene was more metaphorical than geographical. Nearly everyone who was there was, at one time or another, stoned; nobody remembers everything the same way. What is undeniably true is that from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s some of the most melodic, atmospheric, and subtly political American popular music was written by residents of, or those associated with, Laurel Canyon—including Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, David Crosby, Stephen Stills, Graham Nash, Chris Hillman, Roger McGuinn, J. D. Souther, Judee Sill, the Mamas and the Papas, Carole King, the Eagles, Richie Furay (in Buffalo Springfield and Poco), and many more. They made music together, played songs for one another with acoustic guitars in all-night jam sessions in each other’s houses. Many of those houses were cottages with stained-glass windows, and fireplaces that warmed the living rooms in the chilly L.A. nights. They took drugs together, formed bands together, broke up those bands, and formed other bands. Many of them slept with each other. The music was mislabeled “soft rock” or “folk rock,” especially in the Northeast, where critics panned it as granola-infused hippie music—too “mellow” and too white. But in truth, it was an amalgam of influences that included blues, rock and roll, jazz, Latin, country and western, psychedelia, bluegrass, and folk. It certainly was a forerunner of today’s “Americana.”

[ click to continue reading at VF ]

Posted on October 29, 2016 by Editor

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Fantasy Experts

from RealClearLife

How the Experts Win at Fantasy Football

by Will Levith

Fantasy FootballAntonio Brown #84 of the Pittsburgh Steelers makes a touchdown catch in front of Greg Toler #28 of the Indianapolis Colts during at 2014 game at Heinz Field. (Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Every year, it’s the same old thing. You buy the fantasy preview magazine. You do the research. You get the ESPN alerts on your phone. You don the Manning jersey and fly to Vegas. When the time comes for you to make your first pick of the year at the big draft, you freeze. Anxiety sets in, as do the cold sweats. You second-guess yourself. Did I do enough? Do I really know what I’m doing?

Hopefully, this isn’t you, but the fantasy yips are something every football team owner has faced at one point or another throughout his or her career. Whether you take part in a snake draft or auction league or another derivation, nobody’s immune to draft day failure. That is, unless you listen to your friends at RealClearLife.

With the biggest weekend for fantasy drafts fast-approaching—Aug. 26-28—we’ve got you covered going into the big night and beyond. We’ve gone ahead and done the heavy lifting, tracking down some of the top experts in the fantasy football world and getting the inside scoop from them.

Our panel includes Rick Wolf, president of FantasyAlarm (he also hosts a popular fantasy sports–related show on Sirius XM radio); Will Carroll, managing editor of FanDuel; and Stacie Stern, general manager of Head2Head Sports. (RealClearLife staff writer Will Levith also threw in his decades worth of fantasy sports knowledge, which has led to at least one title, a runner-up, and a whole lot of losing.)

[ click to continue reading at RealClearLife.com ]

Posted on October 26, 2016 by Editor

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Damon Baehrel

from The New Yorker

THE MOST EXCLUSIVE RESTAURANT IN AMERICA

Damon Baehrel’s methods are a marvel, and his tables are all booked until 2025. Or are they?

By 

“He is an unheralded genius,” a food critic said of Damon Baehrel. “He really should be in the upper echelons of the greatest chefs who have ever lived.” ILLUSTRATION BY ELEANOR DAVIS

The first time Jeffrey Merrihue came across the name Damon Baehrel, he was amazed that he hadn’t heard of him. “I didn’t understand how the secret had been kept,” Merrihue said recently. “The people I go around with, it’s hard for us to find something that is genuinely unique and new.” The people Merrihue goes around with are gastronomes, the trophy hunters of haute cuisine, the kind who travel the world to dine at famous, or famously obscure, restaurants. After a trip to Cape Town this spring, to a restaurant called the Test Kitchen, Merrihue, who lives in London and produces promotional videos for restaurants, became, he says, the second person to have eaten at every restaurant on the so-called World’s 50 Best list. He’s also been to eighty of the restaurants to which Michelin has granted three stars.

Around Christmas in 2013, a friend of Merrihue’s alerted him to a Bloomberg News piece about an unranked contender, which Bloomberg called the “most exclusive restaurant in the U.S.” It described a gourmet operation—in Earlton, New York, a half hour south of Albany—in the basement of a woodland home. Once called Damon Baehrel at the Basement Bistro, the place was now simply called Damon Baehrel, after its presiding wizard and host, who served as forager, farmer, butcher, chef, sous-chef, sommelier, waiter, busboy, dishwasher, and mopper. Baehrel derived his ingredients, except meat, fish, and dairy, from his twelve acres of yard, garden, forest, and swamp. He made his oils and flours from acorns, dandelions, and pine; incorporated barks, saps, stems, and lichen, while eschewing sugar, butter, and cream; cured his meats in pine needles; made dozens of cheeses (without rennet); and cooked on wooden planks, soil, and stone. He had christened his approach Native Harvest. The diners who got into the restaurant raved about it online. But at the time it was booked through 2020. “We spend our lives looking for places like this,” Merrihue said.

Undaunted, Merrihue sent an e-mail to the address provided on Baehrel’s Web site. A man who identified himself as Terrance, a friend of the chef’s, wrote that Baehrel had stopped taking reservations. “That wound me up even more,” Merrihue said. “I pride myself on getting into restaurants.” Still, it didn’t look good. “I thought, I might die before I get a chance to eat there.”

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on October 23, 2016 by Editor

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