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Hey where’s the party at?

from New Atlas

Simulation suggests 68 percent of the universe may not actually exist

by 

According to the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (Lambda-CDM) model, which is the current accepted standard for how the universe began and evolved, the ordinary matter we encounter every day only makes up around five percent of the universe’s density, with dark matter comprising 27 percent, and the remaining 68 percent made up of dark energy, a so-far theoretical force driving the expansion of the universe. But a new study has questioned whether dark energy exists at all, citing computer simulations that found that by accounting for the changing structure of the cosmos, the gap in the theory, which dark energy was proposed to fill, vanishes.

Published in 1915, Einstein’s general theory of relativity forms the basis for the accepted origin story of the universe, which says that the Big Bang kicked off the expansion of the universe about 13.8 billion years ago. The problem is, the equations at work are incredibly complicated, so physicists tend to simplify parts of them so they’re a bit more practical to work with. When models are then built up from these simplified versions, small holes can snowball into huge discrepancies.

[ click to continue reading at New Atlas ]

Posted on March 31, 2017 by Editor

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Blowing up a 200-ton rock. Cool.

Posted on March 30, 2017 by Editor

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Asteroid Chicken

from SPACE

Wrong-Way, Daredevil Asteroid Plays ‘Chicken’ with Jupiter

By Hanneke Weitering

This image of asteroid 2015 BZ509, captured by the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO), helped astronomers establish the object's retrograde, co-orbital nature.This image of asteroid 2015 BZ509, captured by the Large Binocular Telescope Observatory (LBTO), helped astronomers establish the object’s retrograde, co-orbital nature.

Credit: LBTO

Astronomers have found a bizarre asteroid orbiting the sun in the wrong direction while playing a risky game of “chicken” with the largest planet in the solar system.

The unnamed asteroid shares Jupiter’s orbital space while moving in the opposite direction as the planet, which looks like a recipe for a collision, astronomers said. Yet somehow, the asteroid has managed to safely dodge Jupiter for at least tens of thousands of laps around the sun, a new study showed.

This mysteriously lucky asteroid was discovered in 2015 by astronomers using the Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response System (Pan-STARRS1) in Hawaii. It was given the provisional designation 2015 BZ509 with the nickname “BZ.” Scientists noticed that the asteroid moves in the opposite direction of every planet and 99.99 percent of asteroids orbiting the sun, in a state known as retrograde motion.

[ click to continue rading at SPACE.com ]

Posted on March 29, 2017 by Editor

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Library Of The Apocalypse

from The Sun

Second Arctic ‘Doomsday Vault’ will allow the world’s precious books to survive Armageddon

Huge archive of digitised documents will be buried deep in an old mine buried within the permafrost of Svalbard in Norway

by Jasper Hamill

Like the Seed Vault, the Doomsday Library is buried in the permafrostAP /Like the Seed Vault, the Doomsday Library is buried in the permafrost

It is hoped countries will choose to store digitised versions of their most important books and documents in the vast library, allowing to survive nuclear war or some other grim apocalypse.

If Britain decided to get involved in the project and put a version of the National Archive in the vault, it would mean that copies of The Sun would be preserved for all eternity – so future generations can enjoy a few episodes of Deidre’s Ye Olde Photo Casebook.

The facility is called the World Arctic Archive and is based in the same area of Norway as the Global Seed Vault, which is stocked up with seeds to enable humanity to survive if a natural disaster wipes out food supplies.

[ click to continue reading at The Sun ]

Posted on March 28, 2017 by Editor

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Sex With Frank

Posted on March 27, 2017 by Editor

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PriestHub

from America Magazine

Confessions of a Porn-Addicted Priest

John Smith

“Forgive me. I have sinned.” I’ve always counted it a privilege to hear these words, to offer forgiveness. But for years, it was tainted with self-recrimination: You’re a hypocrite. Indeed, who was I to forgive or offer counsel, when I struggled with sin that I myself refused to confess because I couldn’t give it up and wasn’t sure I wanted to? Now, I have a confession to make.

It began during seminary, scanning photo galleries of models and actresses that I was attracted to. It seemed harmless, no threat to my celibate commitment. I took that promise seriously. I had no illusions that it would be easy, and it wasn’t. This might take the edge off, I thought.

I had no fears about its effects on my everyday life. I maintained proper boundaries in my work. I was especially vigilant when I was aware of my attraction to someone. I stayed away from sexually suggestive comments, and never flirted or acted inappropriately. I was the model of propriety, even as my browsing turned from the scantily clad to the unclothed.

My busyness seemed like a grace. Studies, ministry and social life always took priority over my explorations in the developing world of online pornography. Keeping my commitments, I reasoned, would ensure it remained a harmless diversion. My self-deception continued, unconfronted.

[ click to continue reading at America ]

Posted on March 26, 2017 by Editor

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Declare Independence

Posted on March 25, 2017 by Editor

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Russians Hacking American Farmers Sorta

from VICE

Why American Farmers Are Hacking Their Tractors With Ukrainian Firmware

JASON KOEBLER

A dive into the thriving black market of John Deere tractor hacking.

To avoid the draconian locks that John Deere puts on the tractors they buy, farmers throughout America’s heartland have started hacking their equipment with firmware that’s cracked in Eastern Europe and traded on invite-only, paid online forums.

Tractor hacking is growing increasingly popular because John Deere and other manufacturers have made it impossible to perform “unauthorized” repair on farm equipment, which farmers see as an attack on their sovereignty and quite possibly an existential threat to their livelihood if their tractor breaks at an inopportune time.

“When crunch time comes and we break down, chances are we don’t have time to wait for a dealership employee to show up and fix it,” Danny Kluthe, a hog farmer in Nebraska, told his state legislature earlier this month. “Most all the new equipment [requires] a download [to fix].”

The nightmare scenario, and a fear I heard expressed over and over again in talking with farmers, is that John Deere could remotely shut down a tractor and there wouldn’t be anything a farmer could do about it.

[ click to continue reading at VICE ]

Posted on March 24, 2017 by Editor

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Season 4 – He Will Not Zip Tie Us

from HEATSTREET

‘He Will Not Divide Us’ Liverpool Stream Taken Down Following 4chan Trolling

By William Hicks

He Will Not Zip Tie Us

For the fourth time, Shia Labeouf and co. claimed the “He Will Not Divide Us” stream had found a permanent home—and for the fourth time they were proved wrong.

The Liverpool, UK, location for the protest livestream has been compromised, with members of 4chan’s /pol/ board scaling the roof of the FACT center and attempting to tear down the flag. Labeouf and his artist friends thought the flag was safe on top of a five- story building in a different country, but again they discounted the power of the Internet.

Trolls went to extensive lengths to scale the building and try to remove the flag, risking physical and legal dangers.

Three guys were able to get on the roof from another building and made their way across to the arts center. They complained that the flag was heavily zip tied to the pole and could not take be taken down without scissors.

The stream was cut off before the flag was taken down, leading to speculation the Brits had failed. But later pictures from the ground revealed the flag had in fact been removed from the pole.

[ click to continue reading at HEATSTREET ]

Posted on March 23, 2017 by Editor

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Chuck Barris Gone

from CNN

Chuck Barris, TV game show creator and host, dies at 87

By Madison Park

(CNN)Chuck Barris, best known as host of the TV series “The Gong Show” and creator of “The Dating Game” and “The Newlywed Game,” died Tuesday.

As host of “The Gong Show,” Barris introduced amateur performers to three celebrity judges, who could put a stop to terrible performances by striking the gong. Much like on “American Idol,” awful performances became ratings smash hits. The TV show aired from 1976 to 1980.

While his shows were wildly popular, they were not a hit with critics. Barris was panned as the King of Schlock, Baron of Bad Taste and Ayatollah of Trasherola.
Apart from game shows, Barris found success as a writer. He penned six best-selling books and a 1962 pop song, “Palisades Park,” which became a No. 3 hit in the US for Freddy Cannon.

Barris later wrote in his book “Confessions of a Dangerous Mind,” that he worked as a CIA assassin while working in TV — a claim denied by the agency. The book became a 2002 movie, directed by George Clooney. Sam Rockwell starred as Barris, and the cast included Julia Roberts, Drew Barrymore and Clooney.

[ click to read full obit at CNN ]

Posted on March 22, 2017 by Editor

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Poopipedia

from Gizmodo

What Your Poop Is Trying to Tell You

by Andrew Tarantola

What the hell is that? Seriously, did that just come out of you or did it crawl up the pipe? If you’ve just exorcised a poo that looks nothing like what you’ve eaten recently, it could be a sign of a serious illness. It could also just be that curry from last Wednesday, so it’s good to know what to look for.

What Goes Into Your Dookie

Human feces goes by many names but is a universal byproduct of the human digestive tract. Yes even your girlfriend poops, even if you’ve never actually seen her do it. Stool is the body’s semi-solid waste product and is comprised of everything that the body could not absorb or otherwise had to expel. Which is to say “crap.”

This includes not just food waste, but also more heinous sounding stuff like dead blood cells, bile, and gastrointestinal bacteria, all covered in a mucus sheath that helps it slide out. Anytime you’ve strained and struggled to pass something that feels not only uncomfortable but actually impossible, you’ve experienced the discomfort of your body not producing enough mucus. It generally means you are dehydrated, so drink some water.

[ click to continue reading at Gizmodo ]

Posted on March 21, 2017 by Editor

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The Alexandria Quartet

from Literary Hub

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF THE LIBRARY OF ALEXANDRIA

ONE OF THE GREAT CENTERS OF HUMAN KNOWLEDGE, EVER

By James Crawford

In 1960, four novels by the well-known English writer Lawrence Durrell were brought together in one volume and published as The Alexandria Quartet. Described by its author as “an investigation of modern love,” it was set in the Egyptian city of Alexandria before and during the Second World War, and was largely based on Durrell’s own experiences during his time there as a press attaché. The Quartet traced the personal lives of a number of key characters—seemingly based on real individuals, including Durrell’s second wife—from different, competing perspectives. He later claimed, however, that, out of all of the people portrayed and incidents featured, “only the city is real.”

Alexandria was the true hero of the book: an exotic, darkly seductive and sensuous city, fragrant of “offal and drying mud, of carnations and jasmine, of animal sweat and clover.” Durrell painted a picture of a cosmopolitan, Greco-Arab outpost, where East met West in a delicious collision of hotels, hashish cafés, colonial villas and squalid slums, all set between the blankness of the desert and the blue of the Mediterranean. Yet Durrell’s Alexandria was far from a product of the 20th century alone. Instead he called it a “capital of memory,” a place that still held on to the “echoes of an extraordinary history.” It was a remnant and a shadow of a much greater city, one born out of a dream two-and-a-half thousand years old.

In 331 BC, according to the Greek historian Plutarch, after successfully conquering Egypt, Alexander the Great received a vision in his sleep. A “grey-haired man of venerable appearance,” told him of “an island in the much-dashing sea in front of Egypt: Pharos is what men call it.” Alexander believed that this visitation was the Greek poet Homer, communicating from beyond the grave. When he travelled to view Pharos, he declared it to be the perfect spot for a city: a city that would bear his name, and that would become a new capital of the ancient world.

[ click to continue reading at Literary Hub ]

Posted on March 20, 2017 by Editor

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Moonbase 2037

from The Independent

Thousands of people could live in space colonies orbiting the Earth in 20 years, expert claims

Space colonists might live longer and eventually grow taller than humans left behind on Earth, Jerry Stone tells The Independent ahead of British Science Festival lecture

by Ian Johnston

spacecolony1.jpgThe colonies would float in space as individual galactic ‘islands’ Rick Guidice/Nasa

Thousands of people could be living in floating space colonies orbiting the Earth in 20 years’ time, according to the head of a project by the British Interplanetary Society (BIS).

And, while life in space might sound unappealing to some, Jerry Stone believe it could actually be healthier than planet Earth, enabling people to live longer and, eventually, grow taller.

Mr Stone, author of the book One Small Step about the moon landings, and other members of the BIS have been updating research carried out in the US in the 1970s into how humans could start living in space in large numbers.

In a speech in Aberdeen as part of British Science Week, Mr Stone will claim humanity is now close to the point where such colonies could be built using material taken from the Moon and asteroids.

[ click to continue reading at The Independent ]

Posted on March 19, 2017 by Editor

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Gravity Re-done

from New Scientist

Rules of attraction: Why it’s time to rethink how gravity works

Fresh suspicions have reopened the case against dark matter, forcing a fundamental rethink of the familiar force that keeps our feet on the ground

By Mark Anderson

Gravity artworkJulien Pacaud

GRAVITY is supposed to be reliable. It’s the familiar force that keeps our feet on the ground and Earth’s atmosphere from hurtling into space. On grander scales, it has shaped the evolution of the universe. What a shame, then, that it sometimes lets you down. To square the whirligig rotations of galaxies and galaxy clusters with our picture of gravity, we have to invent a whole new form of matter that no one has ever seen: dark matter. To explain why the universe’s expansion is accelerating, we have to conjure up an equally mysterious essence known as dark energy.

But what if we never really knew gravity at all? What if out there, beyond where we can easily keep our eye on it, the universal force doesn’t stick to the rules?

It’s a heretical idea, if not an entirely novel one. Now though, renewed scrutiny of galaxies and surprises from the realm of quantum information theory are reinvigorating the quest to rethink gravity. Radical ideas are emerging that amount to a fundamental transformation of how we understand space-time – and what gravity really is. In this picture, dark matter ceases to exist. And dark energy, rather than being something that works against gravity, might be part of what creates it.

[ click to continue reading at New Scientist ]

Posted on March 18, 2017 by Editor

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Livin’ The Dream

Posted on March 17, 2017 by Editor

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Space War Coming

from The Washington Post

War in space is becoming a real threat

By David Ignatius

Among the memorabilia in Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein’s office is a fragment of the Wright brothers’ first airplane. But the most intriguing items may be two small plastic satellites on sticks that can be maneuvered to simulate a dogfight in space.

Space is now a potential battle zone, Goldfein explains in an interview. The Air Force wants to ensure “space superiority,” which he says means “freedom from attack and freedom to maneuver.”

If you think cyberwar raises some tricky issues, get your mind around this next big threat worrying the Pentagon. Similar problems exist in both the cyber and space domains: U.S. commercial and military interests are interwoven but deeply suspicious of each other; the technologies are borderless but are being weaponized by hostile nation-states; and attacks on satellites and other systems may be invisible and difficult to attribute.

Today’s digital world hangs on the satellite networks that invisibly circle the globe. They’re the wiring system for many commercial and military operations down below, and they’re highly vulnerable to attack. Russia has jammed GPS reception in Ukraine; China has hacked U.S. weather satellites; North Korea has jammed signals over the demilitarized zone.

The cloud overhead is thickening: As of mid-2016, the Union of Concerned Scientists counted 1,419 satellites orbiting the globe, including 576 from the United States, 181 from China and 140 from Russia. More than half are in low Earth orbit; most of the rest are geostationary, about 22,000 miles from Earth. Roughly 350 satellites, or 25 percent of the total, are for military use. At least 12 nations now have space-launch capability.

[ click to continue reading at WaPo ]

Posted on March 16, 2017 by Editor

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Save The Banana!

from WIRED

Humans Made the Banana Perfect—But Soon, It’ll Be Gone

by Rob Dunn

GETTY IMAGES

ON A PLATE, a single banana seems whimsical—yellow and sweet, contained in its own easy-to-open peel. It is a charming breakfast luxury as silly as it is delicious and ever-present. Yet when you eat a banana the flavor on your tongue has complex roots, equal parts sweetness and tragedy.

In 1950, most bananas were exported from Central America. Guatemala in particular was a key piece of a vast empire of banana plantations run by the American-owned United Fruit Company. United Fruit Company paid Guatemala’s government modest sums in exchange for land. With the land, United Fruit planted bananas and then did as it pleased. It exercised absolute control not only over what workers did but also over how and where they lived. In addition, it controlled transportation, constructing, for example, the first railway in the country, one that was designed to be as useless as possible for the people of Guatemala and as useful as possible for transporting bananas. The company’s profits were immense. In 1950, its revenues were twice the gross domestic product of the entire country of Guatemala. Yet while the United Fruit Company invested greatly in its ability to move bananas, little was invested in understanding the biology of bananas themselves.

[ click to continue reading at WIRED ]

Posted on March 15, 2017 by Editor

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Crystallizing Time

from NATURE

The quest to crystallize time

Bizarre forms of matter called time crystals were supposed to be physically impossible. Now they’re not.

by Elizabeth Gibney

Nik Spencer/Nature

Christopher Monroe spends his life poking at atoms with light. He arranges them into rings and chains and then massages them with lasers to explore their properties and make basic quantum computers. Last year, he decided to try something seemingly impossible: to create a time crystal.

The name sounds like a prop from Doctor Who, but it has roots in actual physics. Time crystals are hypothetical structures that pulse without requiring any energy — like a ticking clock that never needs winding. The pattern repeats in time in much the same way that the atoms of a crystal repeat in space. The idea was so challenging that when Nobel prizewinning physicist Frank Wilczek proposed the provocative concept1 in 2012, other researchers quickly proved there was no way to create time crystals.

But there was a loophole — and researchers in a separate branch of physics found a way to exploit the gap. Monroe, a physicist at the University of Maryland in College Park, and his team used chains of atoms they had constructed for other purposes to make a version of a time crystal2 (see ‘How to create a time crystal’). “I would say it sort of fell in our laps,” says Monroe.

[ click to continue reading at NATURE ]

Posted on March 14, 2017 by Editor

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Capturer La Boeuf

from Page Six

[ click to view at Page Six ]

Posted on March 11, 2017 by Editor

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MasterChef Junior

from The Other Cape

We’ll Have What She’s Having

Posted by Heather Atwood

MasterChef Junior contestant Lila DeLuca in her Rockport kitchen. (Photograph by Jonathan Kozowyk)MasterChef Junior contestant Lila DeLuca in her Rockport kitchen. (Photograph by Jonathan Kozowyk)

Late last spring, Lila DeLuca, a braided 10-year-old Rockporter, quietly slipped off to Los Angeles. She reported to her elementary school that she would be accompanying her father, Scott, on an “indefinite business trip.”

This, of course, was cover for the strict code of silence the Fox Broadcasting Company imposes upon its MasterChef contestants — even the juniors.

In her 2016 audition video, DeLuca had proven to the MasterChef Junior talent team that she had the right stuff to be one of the 40 kids qualified to endure — with all due adorableness — celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay’s famously menacing temper and the lofty standards of his co-host Christina Tosi, the high priestess of pastry at New York’s Momofuku Milk Bar.

For the next six weeks, DeLuca would proceed to croûtoncoulis, caramelize, and squeal for joy — like 10-year-olds do. While the show has concluding taping and the results are in, DeLuca is prohibited from sharing any of the juicy details. But she can say that, yes, there was school (as California laws require). And there were field trips, intended to keep young minds working in between the intensity of shooting, and, of course, there was the once-in-a-lifetime experience of being on the set of a nationally-televised, wildly-popular TV show.

[ click to continue reading at The Other Cape ]

Posted on March 10, 2017 by Editor

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Money Macks

Posted on March 9, 2017 by Editor

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Buy This Dude’s Book – “The Pilgrim’s Ladder”

from KRCR

Climber reveals survival tale after 2,000 ft. fall from mountain

By: Kelli Saam

PARADISE, Calif. – A mountain climber from Butte County survived two days in the snow after falling about 2,000 feet from a mountain summit in Colorado. Doctors in Colorado told his family it’s a fall no one would be expected to survive.

Ryan Montoya, 23, of Paradise, is recovering in a Denver hospital. He went missing Sunday while climbing alone trying to summit Pyramid Peak, a 14,000 foot peak near Aspen, Colorado.

Montoya’s mother said he was about 40 feet from the summit when the ice he stepped on collapsed, sending him sliding down the mountain. She shared what he told her about how he survived.

Montoya slid an estimated 1,500-2,000 feet down East face of the mountain, later telling his mother he fell long enough “to do a lot of talking, thinking and yelling all the way down.”

His mother said two weeks ago he published a book available on Amazon. The book is called ‘The Pilgrim’s Ladder.’  It is about climbing, life, the search for beauty and truth, with some philosophical musings. Montoya is an avid climber and has traveled to the mountains of Nepal.

On facebook, his mother quipped “It would be nice if he sold enough copies for pay for a new climbing helmet!”

[ click to read full article at KRCR ]
[ click to purchase Ryan’s book at Amazon ]

Posted on March 8, 2017 by Editor

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Full D5 4412

Posted on March 7, 2017 by Editor

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See, honey, I told you orgasms are better for you than yoga.

from The Daily Mail

Want a promotion? Have daily orgasms! Study reveals regular sex makes you more productive, better at your job, and more likely to move up the ladder

By MIA DE GRAAF

A study documented the mood of 159 married employees for two weeks. They found men and women were far more productive and engaged if they'd had sex the night beforeA study documented the mood of 159 married employees for two weeks. They found men and women were far more productive and engaged if they’d had sex the night before

You may think the key to a promotion is working late, schmoozing with the boss, or wearing the right thing.

But a new study suggests something more personal could be the secret.

According to new research, people who orgasm at least once a day are far more likely to enjoy their jobs, work hard, and move up the career ladder.

They also have a healthier work-life balance.

‘We make jokes about people having a “spring in their step,” but it turns out this is actually a real thing and we should pay attention to it,’ said Keith Leavitt, an associate professor at Oregon State University.

[ click to continue reading at The Daily Mail ]

Posted on March 6, 2017 by Editor

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Life Keeps Getting Older

from Science News

Oldest microfossils suggest life thrived on Earth about 4 billion years ago

Ancient microbes were spewed from deep-sea hydrothermal vents, study claims

BY MEGHAN ROSEN

hematiteSIGNS OF LIFE  In rocks left over from ancient hydrothermal vents, these microscopic tubes of hematite, an ore of iron, may be remnants of early microbes. / M. DODD

Tiny, iron-rich fossils exhumed from the depths of an ancient ocean could reveal the cradle of life.

These micrometer-scale structures are probably remnants of microorganisms that once lived amidst ancient hydrothermal vents, researchers suggest March 1 in Nature.

“In a nutshell, what we’ve found are the oldest microfossils on Earth,” says study coauthor Matthew Dodd, a biogeochemist at University College London. The rocks that hold the fossils came from Quebec and date to somewhere between 4.28 billion and 3.77 billion years old — when Earth was still a baby. The next oldest microfossils reported are just under 3.5 billion years old, though their validity has been debated (SN: 2/8/14, p.16).

If Dodd’s structures truly are remnants of microbes, “it’s fantastic. I love it,” says astrobiologist Martin Van Kranendonk of the University of New South Wales in Sydney. But he’s not convinced. In fact, he says, “there’s just not definitive proof that any of the textures or the minerals or features they have is unique of life.”

[ click to continue reading at Science News ]

Posted on March 5, 2017 by Editor

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Space Junk Threat

from Bloomberg

Earth’s Orbiting Junkyard Threatens the Space Economy

Rocket and satellite litter is endangering private space commerce. Enter the cosmic debris tracking industry.

by Justin Bachman

A depiction of orbital debris in low-earth orbit. NASA

You never see it in those lovely NASA pictures of Earth, but the space surrounding our pale blue dot is a cosmic junkyard. Debris abounds, moving at ludicrous speeds and presenting plenty of hassles for satellite operators who do business in orbit.

This pollution poses an existential risk for greater commercialization of space, from the grand ambitions of Elon Musk’s SpaceX Corp. and Jeff Bezos’s Blue Origin LLC to other players who see promising futures for an array of space activities, from tourism, to imaging, to pharmaceutical research.

In low-earth orbit, space debris travels at velocities approaching 5 miles per second—roughly 18,000 mph—which gives even the tiniest bits of junk enormous destructive energy. A 1-centimeter-wide aluminum sphere in low-earth orbit packs the kinetic equivalent of a safe moving at 60 mph. If it hits your satellite, well, that could ruin the whole day.

Aggregate too much debris in certain areas, and low-earth orbit becomes an increasingly difficult and far costlier environment for commercial companies. Today, satellite operators periodically maneuver their birds to avoid object strikes just as NASA must do with the International Space Station. The key, however, is knowing what’s headed your way.

[ click to continue reading at Bloomberg ]

Posted on March 4, 2017 by Editor

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50 Shades of Vanilla Shitstorm

from Inside Hook

21 EROTIC FILMS HOTTER THAN THE VANILLA SH*TSTORM THAT IS ‘50 SHADES DARKER’

Might wanna put the kids to bed before turning these films on

BY SHARI GAB

Occasionally, a movie comes along that takes all accepted facts about a given event, era, lifestyle or historical figure and throws them out the window. Michael Bay’s Pearl Harbor comes to mind.

And now we’ve got 50 Shades Darker, and its laughable depictions of the wide and wonderful world of kink. Because nevermind that the entire film is based on narrative tropes from the 1950s, the storyline isn’t provocative in the least, and the multimillionaire protagonist drives an upper-middle class Audi R8 Spyder. We ain’t buying that, and neither would he.

What really irks is the flick’s problematic (and wildly innacurate) portrayal of BDSM, where emotional bargaining qualifies as consent and fetishism parallels not with pleasure, but pathology. And as if that wasn’t all enough to make one throw actual rotten tomatoes at the screen, the sex is really mundane. The second in a trilogy, it’s perhaps the only time you’ll hear me say “We really don’t need to go a third time.”

So save yourself from the damp washcloth that is 50 Shades and enjoy these 21 films that got BDSM right.

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on March 3, 2017 by Editor

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Look down, not up.

from Express

What is this 2.5mile long object moving under the Pacific Ocean?

A MASSIVE circular structure has been spotted slowly crawling across the Pacific sea floor 3000 feet below the surface.

By PAUL BALDWIN

The object, which observers say looks man-made rather than natural, is estimated to measure more than 2.5miles in diameter and is surrounded by what look like massive tank tracks.

Other observers suggest the tracks may be trenches or fortifications.

But the most baffling thing is the circular object which appears to have left a 41 mile track in its wake as it trundled across the floor of the North Pacific off the Californian coast .

The object was brought to the attention of alien investigators SecureTeam10

Tyler, who helps run the internet investigations site, said: “There are certain areas of the ocean that are obviously blurred out. But what better place would there be for another race or another group of beings to hide than in the deep of our own oceans?

“While we are up staring at the sky all day and worrying about what’s up there we have 90 per cent of our oceans unchartered.

[ click to continue reading at Express ]

Posted on March 2, 2017 by Editor

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Stray meteor nearly wipes out Dallas

from the Dallas News

Thunderous meteor rattles West Texas sky with sonic boom

by Liz Farmer

A booming meteor rocketed over Texas this weekend, rattling houses with a sonic boom, according to reports.

Authorities in West Texas and beyond received calls about possible explosions Sunday night.

It turned out to be a very bright meteor, according to the American Meteor Society.

About 40 people reported on the nonprofit group’s website that they’d seen the fiery meteor in Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Colorado about 9 p.m.

Deputy Fire Marshal Nathan Hines said he heard what sounded like thunder in Snyder, about 80 miles west of Abilene, the Lubbock Avalanche-Journal reports.

“You could see a flash, like if an electrical transformer flashes at night, up to our northwest,” Hines said. “But it was cloudy here — kinda rainy — so we didn’t actually see any kind of fireball or anything.”

[ click to continue reading at Dallas News ]

Posted on March 1, 2017 by Editor

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