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They’re Still Coming…

from The Mirror

‘Huge meteor’ crashes to earth as flash of light is spotted in sky and houses start to shake

 

A ‘ meteor ‘ crashed into earth causing tremors and a huge “flash of light” in the sky, it has been reported.

The fireball was spotted at Turkey Beach and Emerald in Queensland, Australia, as hundreds of locals took the social media to report their houses shaking and a “burning light” in the sky.

Police received a number of calls from concerned residents in the Gladstone area, reporting tremors in what was initially believed to be an earthquake.

Geoscience Australia has since officially ruled out an earthquake and Higgins Storm Chasing crew said a “meteorite impacted somewhere offshore”.

In a Facebook post , the group said: “The light was seen as far south as Hervey Bay and as far north as Yepoon with a tremor being felt upon impact over the general Gladstone area and Boyne Island.

Witnesses took to social media to describe a “ball of flame falling from the sky” and a “brilliant meteor flash overhead and disappear over the sea”.

[ click to continue reading at The Mirror ]

Posted on September 30, 2016 by Editor

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Pornography Explained

from The New Yorker

MAKING SENSE OF MODERN PORNOGRAPHY

While the Internet has made porn ubiquitous, it has also thrown the industry into severe decline.

By 

A new study of the porn industry tries to sidestep ideological battles, with a neutral, fact-driven approach. PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY SARA CWYNAR

If you watch pornography, it’s likely that you do so on the Internet. The days when consuming pornography meant buying or borrowing a pinup magazine or watching a film loop in a peepshow booth are long gone, as are those of tracking down adult-video stores in faraway neighborhoods. Most porn is viewed on easily accessible “tube sites,” such as YouPorn, RedTube, XVideos, and Pornhub. These work on the same model as YouTube: they are free, and steer users to amateur videos, snippets uploaded by commercial producers, and pirated material. Watching pornography no longer requires leaving the privacy of your home, though that doesn’t mean you necessarily do it there: according to a recent CNBC report, seventy per cent of American online-porn access occurs during the nine-to-five workday.

Pornography has changed unrecognizably from its so-called golden age—the period, in the sixties and seventies, when adult movies had theatrical releases and seemed in step with the wider moment of sexual liberation, and before V.H.S. drove down production quality, in the eighties. Today’s films are often short and nearly always hard-core; that is, they show penetrative sex. Among the most popular search terms in 2015 were “anal,” “amateur,” “teen,” and—one that would surely have made Freud smile—“mom and son.” Viewing figures are on a scale that golden-age moguls never dreamed of: in 2014, Pornhub alone had seventy-eight billion page views, and XVideos is the fifty-sixth most popular Web site in the world. Some porn sites get more traffic than news sites like CNN, and less only than platforms such as Google, Facebook, Amazon, and PayPal. The twenty-first-century porn kings aren’t flamboyant magazine owners like Larry Flynt, whose taboo-breaking Hustler first published labial “pink shots,” in the mid-seventies, but faceless tech executives. The majority of the world’s tube sites are effectively a monopoly—owned by a company called MindGeek, whose bandwidth use exceeds that of Amazon or Facebook. Its C.E.O. until recently was a German named Fabian Thylmann, who earned a reported annual income of a hundred million dollars; he sold the company while being investigated for tax evasion.

The millions of people using these sites probably don’t care much about who produces their content. But those who work in porn in the United States tend to draw a firm line between the “amateur” porn that now proliferates online and the legal adult-film industry that took shape after the California Supreme Court ruled, in California v. Freeman (1989), that filmed sex did not count as prostitution. Since then, the industry has been based in Los Angeles County’s San Fernando Valley, where its professional norms and regulations have mimicked its more respectable Hollywood neighbors. In “The Pornography Industry: What Everyone Needs to Know” (Oxford), Shira Tarrant explains how that industry works in the new age of Internet porn, and sets out to provide neutral, “even-handed” information about its production and consumption.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on September 29, 2016 by Editor

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Huge-ass Fungus

from Atlas Obscura

This 84-Year-Old Retiree Wants ‘the Internet’ to See a Massive Mushroom He Found

Don Smith is proud.

By Erik Shilling

You may not be able to tell from the photo, but, as his granddaughter wrote on Facebook, Don Smith is a very happy man. That’s a mushroom he’s got on his lap, a 15-pound mushroom, which he found on his 100-acre property in North Dorchester, Ontario, about 90 miles southwest of Toronto.

“I look for them once in awhile because I know a few people who like them,” Smith explained to the CBC. “I don’t like them myself, but I give them to my friends.”

[ click to continue reading at Atlas Obscura ]

Posted on September 28, 2016 by Editor

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The Rise and Fall of Tower Records

from Dangerous Minds

THE RISE AND FALL OF TOWER RECORDS AND HOW THE MUSIC INDUSTRY SCREWED THE POOCH IN THE LATE ‘90S

by Christopher Bickel

I just finished watching Colin Hanks’ impressive documentary on the rise and fall of Tower Records, titled All Things Must Pass.

While I’d recommend the film to anyone who was ever a frequent Tower shopper, I’d say it’s a must-see for anyone who has ever worked music retail, particularly those who worked during the late ‘90s to early ‘2000s, which saw the decline of physical media sales.

The film centers on Russ Solomon who founded Tower Records in Sacramento, California in 1960, and traces the path he took in building the Tower brand from a single “supermarket of music” to a worldwide mega-chain. The documentary does a fair job at assessing the “perfect storm” that caused the ultimate collapse of the chain, culminating with the closing of their last company-owned store in 2006.

Interviews with David Geffen, Elton John, Bruce Springsteen, and the obligatory Dave Grohl documentary appearance (is there some rule that says Grohl has to appear in EVERY music-related documentary?) give some insight to Tower’s cultural significance, rounding out the insider interviews with Tower’s top brass who detail the company’s rise and fall.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on September 27, 2016 by Editor

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The Best Year Of Her Life… in pictures.

from WFMY

Naked Man Photobombs Student’s Senior Photos

EUGENE, Ore. — A South Eugene High School student is getting a lot of attention for her unique, if somewhat disturbing, senior photos.

Jillian Henry tweeted one of the pictures out this weekend and now it’s been retweeted 24,000 times and has 74,000 likes.

The extra attention is due to the completely unexpected naked photo-bombers in the picture; a naked man and his dog.

Jillian and a friend were down at the river, snapping shots for the yearbook, when a man in the buff wandered down to the opposite river bank.

“His dog was running around and I was like, ‘He’s naked!’” Jillian said. “And I was like, ‘He has to see us. He has to know we have a camera.’”

[ click to continue reading at WFMY ]

Posted on September 26, 2016 by Editor

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“The power of an ellipsis…”

from The Times Literary Supplement

Byron burning

CORIN THROSBY 

A sketch from The Wonderful History of Lord Byron & His Dog by E. B. Pigot, 1807 © Harry Ransom Center, The University of Texas at Austin

Byron knew, more than any author before him, the power of an ellipsis. Foreshadowing twentieth-century theorists such as Wolfgang Iser, who posited that it is primarily the reader who creates a poem’s meaning by navigating gaps in the text, Byron filled his work with tantalizing omissions to fire the imagination. One of his bestselling poems, The Giaour, a classically Byronic tale of a brooding hero avenging his murdered beloved, was subtitled “A Fragment” to create an illusion that the full story lay elsewhere. The poem is riddled with as­terisks that mark supposedly lost sections. “An outline is the best,” Byron wrote in his final epic Don Juan, “– a lively reader’s fancy does the rest”.

The poet invited conjecture not only about his work but also about his personal life. Readers were quick to see a link between Byron’s melancholic aristocratic heroes and the poet himself. In his preface to the work that made him famous in 1814, Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage, Byron insisted that his character was not based on a “real personage”, but purely “the child of imagination”. Yet he continually gave his heroes the same dark hair and pale brow that readers were seeing in reproduced portraits of the poet that hung in countless print shop windows, and he often dropped in teasing autobiographical references to ancestral homes and heroic acts abroad. Readers looked for coded messages that they felt revealed the real Byron amid the gossip, and the Byronic hero was just ambiguous enough for them to see in him whatever suited them.

It is a wonderful dramatic irony, then, that Byron’s memoirs – which might have finally provided the “truth” about his life – were destroyed soon after his death. The story goes that three of his closest friends (his publisher, John Murray; his fellow celebrity poet, Thomas Moore; and his companion since his Cambridge days, John Cam Hobhouse), together with lawyers representing Byron’s half-sister and his widow, decided that the manuscript was so scandalous, so unsuitable for public consumption, that it would ruin Byron’s reputation forever. Gathered in Murray’s drawing room in Albemarle Street, they ripped up the pages and tossed them into the fire. The incident is often described as the greatest crime in literary ­history. It has certainly served to fuel curiosity and conjecture about Byron’s personal life for another couple of centuries. What was the damning secret his friends needed to protect? Domestic abuse? Sodomy? Incest? Probably all three, we imagine.

[ click to continue reading at The Times Literary Supplement ]

Posted on September 25, 2016 by Editor

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Crow Dance. Wild.

Posted on September 24, 2016 by Editor

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Massive Banksy Attack

from artnews

Is Massive Attack Founder Robert Del Naja the Real Banksy?

Would that blow your mind?

by Brian Boucher

Robert Robert “3D” del Naja, right, and Grantley “Daddy G” Marshall of British trip-hop band Massive Attack during a visit to the Burj al-Barajneh camp for Palestinian refugees, south of the Lebanese capital Beirut, on July 28, 2014. Photo Maya Hautefeuille/AFP/Getty Images.

What if one of the biggest stars of the trip hop genre were also the most famous street artist of our day?

Journalist Craig Williams says he’s got compelling evidence that Robert “3D” Del Naja is also the anonymous street artist Banksy, known for his cheeky stencil work and other street art projects worldwide, reports the Daily Mail.

Related: Yet Another Banksy Mural Destroyed by Clueless Construction Workers

Again and again, Williams claims, murals pop up in cities where Massive Attack has staged concerts, shortly after the performances take place. Not only that, but Del Naja was a graffiti artist in the 1980s and professes to be friendly with Banksy.

Massive Attack, which Del Naja co-founded in Bristol along with Grant “Daddy G” Marshall, debuted with the album Blue Lines in 1991; that LP and 1998’s Mezzanine are cited in Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The band has sold more than 11 million records.

Related: Is Banksy’s Iconic ‘Spy Booth’ Mural Lost Forever?

To support his theory, Williams offers the following: Massive Attack appeared in San Francisco in late April 2010; a half-dozen Banksy murals appeared May 1. Just days later, the band played in Toronto and Banksy murals popped up in that city. The band took to the stage at the Hollywood Bowl in 2006; Banksy’s “Barely Legal” exhibition took place a week later.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on September 23, 2016 by Editor

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AMC Gothic

from C21Media

AMC gets Gothic with CBS

American Gothic is produced by CBS Television Studios

AMC Networks International Iberia has picked up CBS drama American Gothic after striking a deal with distributor CBS Studios International.

The 13-part show, which will air on the AMC-owned network in Spain and Portugal from October, centres on a prominent Boston family reeling in the wake of the chilling discovery that someone in their midst is linked to an infamous string of murders.

It is produced by CBS Television Studios, with Corinne Brinkerhoff, Justin Falvey, Darryl Frank, James Frey and Todd Cohen attached as executive producers. Juliet Rylance and Virginia Madsen star.

[ click to continue reading at C21Media ]

Posted on September 22, 2016 by Editor

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Cum Face

from Dangerous Minds

CUM FACE: PORTRAITS OF WOMEN REACHING ORGASM

001lauraorgasm.jpg
Laura.

Photographer Albert Pocej set himself an unusual challenge. He wanted “to capture the moment of women reaching the highest point of physical pleasure.”

How did he come (ahem) up with this idea? In his wildest dreams, of course.

I simply woke up and I knew I just had to do it. So I tried to explore the female orgasm through a photography experiment.

At first I thought it would be impossible. Finding the models was the most difficult part. I started to write to everybody I know without any boundaries since all the women are so different. The answers I got were mostly two kinds: “I don’t have enough courage”, and just the silence, which is also pretty obvious as an answer. When I finally found 20 women that were ready to take part in this project, some of them refused to continue when I told them that it will not be acting, and some of them weren’t able to relax already while shooting. So at the end there were only 15 left.

According to Albert—all of the participating models “experienced real orgasms” during their photographic session. To achieve the “best results” Albert used time lapse to help the models relax. Some of them didn’t need it and were happy to enjoy themselves in front of the photographer.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on September 21, 2016 by Editor

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Hunter Returns Hemingway’s Horns

from Chicago Tribune

Hunter S. Thompson’s wife returns antlers he stole from Ernest Hemingway’s house

Hemingway's Idaho homeAn interior view of the house formerly owned by Ernest Hemingway outside Ketchum, Id., in 2007. (Ted S. Warren / AP)

A young Hunter S. Thompson went to Idaho to write about Ernest Hemingway and decided to take a piece of his hero home with him — a set of trophy elk antlers.More than half a century later, the gonzo journalist’s wife returned the antlers to Hemingway’s house in the mountain town of Ketchum.

“He was embarrassed that he took them,” Anita Thompson said Thursday, noting the deep respect her husband had for Hemingway’s work. “He wished he hadn’t taken them. He was young, it was 1964, and he got caught up in the moment.

“He talked about it several times, about taking a road trip and returning them,” she said.

She gave back the antlers Aug. 5 to Ketchum Community Library, which helps catalog and preserve items in the residence where the author took his own life. It’s now owned by the Nature Conservancy.

In 1964, Hunter Thompson, then 27, came to Ketchum when he was still a conventional journalist. He had not yet developed his signature style, dubbed gonzo journalism, that involved inserting himself, often outrageously, into his reporting and that propelled him into a larger-than-life figure.

Thompson was writing a story for the National Observer about why the globe-trotting Hemingway shot and killed himself at his home three years earlier at age 61. Thompson attributed the suicide in part to rapid changes in the world that led to upheavals in places Hemingway loved most — Africa and Cuba.

[ click to continue reading at Chicago Tribune ]

Posted on September 20, 2016 by Editor

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More Evidence Cats Are Evil

from The Telegraph

Cuddling kittens can kill you, warn scientists

by 

Bettina Strenske / Alamy Stock PhotScientists found the scope and impact of a potentially deadly cat-borne disease was wider than they thought CREDIT: BETTINA STRENSKE / ALAMY STOCK PHOTO

Cuddling a kitten may always make you feel better – but it could be dangerous to your health, according to experts.

Doctors from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the US conducted a large-scale survey of the cat-borne bacterial disease cat scratch fever.

They found the scope and impact of the potentially deadly disease was larger than they thought.

The disease causes fever, pustules and in extreme cases, the complications from the illness can cause death.

[ click to continue reading at The Telegraph ]

Posted on September 19, 2016 by Editor

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THE HAUNTED Goes to SyFy

from Deadline

Syfy Orders Pilots For AI Drama ‘The Machine’, ‘Haunted’ & ‘Happy!’ Adaptation

by 

NBC Universal Logos
The Machine is set in a world that is being transformed by the emergence of artificial intelligence. The project

Syfy is stepping up its development efforts with three pilot orders to artificial intelligence drama The Machine, based on the 2013 cult hit film; supernatural horror-drama Haunted; and Happybased on Grant Morrison and Darick Robertson’s graphic novel. All three hail from sibling Universal Cable Prods.

After several straight-to-series orders, Syfy returned to pilot development this year with the pilot greenlights of Prototype in February and Superman prequel Krypton in May. The former was filmed and not going forward, while the latter is currently casting. Today’s pickups mark the largest batch of pilot orders for Syfy in a while as the network had been going through a creative revamp.

The Haunted is a supernatural horror-drama about four siblings who reunite following their parents’ deaths. As they try to overcome their fractured personal relationships they find that they must also face the literal ghosts from their past in order to survive. Noga Landau (Tau, The Magicians) wrote the pilot and is also a co-executive producer. Author James Frey and Todd Cohen of Full Fathom Five will executive produce.

[ click to read full article at Deadline.com ]

Posted on September 18, 2016 by Editor

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A Pack Of Wolves Runs Through It

Posted on September 17, 2016 by Editor

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Edward Albee Gone

from The LA Times

Playwright Edward Albee, 3-time Pulitzer winner and ‘Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?’ author, dead at 88

by Associated Press

Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee has died in suburban New York City at age 88. (Jennifer S. Altman/For The Times)

Three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Edward Albee has died in suburban New York City at age 88.

Albee challenged theatrical convention in masterworks such as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” and “A Delicate Balance.”

Albee assistant Jackob Holder says the playwright died Friday at his home on Long Island. No cause of death has been given.

Albee had been arguably America’s greatest living playwright after the deaths of Arthur Miller and August Wilson in 2005.

Sharp-tongued humor and dark themes were the hallmarks of Albee’s style. In more than 25 plays Albee skewered such mainstays of American culture as marriage, child-rearing, religion and upper-class comforts.

[ click to continue reading at LAT ]

Posted on September 16, 2016 by Editor

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Nina Hagen Diddles

Posted on September 15, 2016 by Editor

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OSIRIS-REx – Asteroid Hunter

from The Christian Science Monitor 

NASA greenlights OSIRIS-REx for asteroid hunt

On September 8, OSIRIS-REx is scheduled to be launched toward the asteroid Bennu to collect samples to send back to Earth. The asteroid may provide hints about the formation of planets and the origins of life on Earth.

By Weston Williams

NASA//Reuters

On September 8 at 7:05 a.m. Eastern time, NASA plans to launch a historic probe to rendezvous with a nearby asteroid.

For the first time, a NASA probe will send pieces of an asteroid back home for study on Earth.

So far, everything seems to be a go for the mission. NASA confirmed details about the probe, the Origins-Spectral Interpretation-Resource Identification-Security-Regolith Explorer or OSIRIS-REx, Wednesday in a press release.

According to NASA, the probe will carry a camera system, multiple types of spectrometers, and a laser altimeter to map the shape of the asteroid Bennu.

[ click to continue reading at CS Monitor ]

Posted on September 14, 2016 by Editor

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Watching Pitch Drip

from Atlas Obscura

The Pitch Drop Experiment

Begun 82 years ago, this science experiment keeps on going, ever so slowly. 
University of Queensland Physics Museum

Begun in 1927 by Professor Thomas Parnell, this experiment was meant to reveal the surprising properties of an everyday material: pitch. Pitch is the name of a number of hard tar-like substances and in this case bitumen was used. Though at room temperature pitch appears to be a solid and can be shattered by a hammer, it is in fact a very high-viscosity liquid, and Professor Parnell wanted to prove it.

Just getting ready to perform the experiment took years. First the Professor heated a sample of pitch and poured it into a sealed funnel. Then, he waited. For three years Parnell let the pitch settle in the funnel, until in 1930, when he felt the pitch was settled enough, he cut the bottom of the funnel, freeing the pitch to begin its mind-bogglingly slow downward escape.

Professor Parnell lived long enough to record only two drips—the first in 1938, eight years after the opening of the funnel – and the second, nine years later in 1947.

Curiously, because it only drips every 8 to 9 years, no one has ever actually seen a drop fall. A webcam was setup in 2000, but due to technical problems it missed the drip. The last drip was nine years ago, so the pitch is due to drop any day now. The webcam is currently set up and one can try their luck, and patience, here.

[ click to read complete article at Atlas Obscura ]

Posted on September 13, 2016 by Editor

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Michelangelo Pranks The Pope

from International Business Times

Michelangelo secretly painted symbols of female anatomy on Sistine Chapel ceiling

Michelangelo may have hidden symbols as dissection of human body was banned by Catholic Church.

By 

Sistine Chapel ceiling MichelangeloClose-up of the ram skull with female anatomy diagramDeivis de Campos et at/Wiley/ Clinical Anatomy

Michelangelo secretly painted symbols of the female anatomy on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel, a team of researchers have said. In analysing the central fresco, The Creation of Eve, a team led by Deivis de Campos of the UFCSPA in Brazil claims there are several representations of female anatomy the artist likely concealed, potentially as a subversive act and to hide his knowledge of anatomy through dissection.

In their study, published in the journal Clinical Anatomy, the team notes that much Renaissance art contains an inner meaning – including animals depicted, positions of characters and juxtapositions. Michelangelo, as an anatomist, may have felt the need to conceal elements of his paintings via symbols.

The team used imaging software to analyse the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel to look for representations of human anatomy. Depictions of female anatomy are normally associated with a downward pointing triangle, while those for males would be upwards pointing.

They found the position of Eve’s arm and forearm “clearly resembles the shape of an inverted triangle … thus, in the exact centre of the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling … Michelangelo may have placed a notorious pagan female symbol”.

[ click to continue reading at IBT ]

Posted on September 12, 2016 by Editor

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Dissected Graces

from Nautilus

The Brief, Mystical Reign of the Wax Cadaver

Early medical models of human anatomy shrouded death in feminine beauty.

BY JOANNA EBENSTEIN

Ebenstein_BR_Venus_open-cl.Image courtesy of Museo Della Specola, Florence, Italy / Bridgeman Images

Toward the end of the 18th century, in a wax workshop in Florence, a life-sized, anatomically correct, dissectible goddess of colored wax was created. Artist Clemente Susini took the idealized feminine beauty for which Italian artists had long been renowned in an ambitious new direction, and to hyper-realistic lengths. The result—an Anatomical Venus—is the perfect object: one whose luxuriously bizarre existence challenges belief. It—or better, she—was conceived as a means of teaching human anatomy without the need for constant dissection, which was messy, ethically fraught, and reliant on scarce cadavers. The Anatomical Venus also tacitly communicated the relationship between the human body and a divinely created cosmos, between art and science, and between nature and mankind, as it was then understood.

Often referred to as the “Medici Venus,” this life-sized, dissectible wax woman with gleaming glass eyes and human hair can still be viewed in her original Venetian glass and rosewood case. She can be disassembled into seven anatomically correct layers, revealing at the final remove a tranquil fetus curled in her womb. She and her sisters, wax women in fixed states of anatomical undress sometimes referred to as Slashed Beauties or Dissected Graces, can still be found in a handful of European museums. Supine in their glass boxes, they beckon with a gentle smile or an ecstatic downcast gaze. One idly toys with a plait of real golden human hair; another clutches at the plush, moth-eaten satin cushions of her case as her torso erupts in a spontaneous, bloodless auto-dissection; another is crowned with a golden tiara, while one further wears a silk ribbon tied in a bow around a dangling entrail.

[ click to continue reading at Nautilus ]

Posted on September 11, 2016 by Editor

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Ring Guy

Posted on September 10, 2016 by Editor

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Aliens Underneath

from New Scientist

Ocean worlds: The search for life in the solar system’s other seas

Our best chance to find alien life lies in the vast oceans inside the icy moons of Saturn and Jupiter – and we don’t have to leave Earth to start looking

By Joshua Sokol

OceanWorlds_MAINValerii Ilnitskii

SUDDENLY, out of darkness, a ghostly city of gnarled white towers looms over the submersible. As the sub approaches to scrape a sample from them, crew-member Kevin Hand spots something otherworldly: a translucent, spaceship-like creature, its iridescent cilia pulsing gently as it passes through the rover’s headlights.

This is not a dispatch from an alien world, but it could be. Hand is a planetary scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab in Pasadena, California, and one of a select few to have visited the carbonate chimneys of the Lost City at the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean. It is the site of an extraordinary ecosystem – one that Hand suspects might be replicated on icy moons orbiting distant gas giants. “In my head, I was saying to myself: this is what it might look like,” he says.

[ click to continue reading at New Scientist ]

Posted on September 9, 2016 by Editor

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Never-Repeating Patterns

from Real Clear Science

The Math Behind Never-Repeating Patterns

By Priya Subramanian

Penrose tiling. PrzemekMajewskiCC BY-SA

Remember the graph paper you used at school, the kind that’s covered with tiny squares? It’s the perfect illustration of what mathematicians call a “periodic tiling of space”, with shapes covering an entire area with no overlap or gap. If we moved the whole pattern by the length of a tile (translated it) or rotated it by 90 degrees, we will get the same pattern. That’s because in this case, the whole tiling has the same symmetry as a single tile. But imagine tiling a bathroom with pentagons instead of squares – it’s impossible, because the pentagons won’t fit together without leaving gaps or overlapping one another.

Patterns (made up of tiles) and crystals (made up of atoms or molecules) are typically periodic like a sheet of graph paper and have related symmetries. Among all possible arrangements, these regular arrangements are preferred in nature because they are associated with the least amount of energy required to assemble them. In fact we’ve only known that non-periodic tiling, which creates never-repeating patterns, can exist in crystals for a couple of decades. Now my colleagues and I have made a model that can help understand how this is expressed.

[ click to continue reading at Real Clear Science ]

Posted on September 8, 2016 by Editor

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Oh, Mickey You’re Still So Fine

Posted on September 7, 2016 by Editor

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Life in a Hellish Place

from Real Clear Science 

What Is the Earliest Evidence for Life on Earth?

by Ross Pomeroy

For the first 600 million years of Earth’s 4.54 billion-year history, our planet was a hellish place. The rampant volcanism and frequent collisions that wracked our world rendered the surface unforgiving and purportedly inhospitable to life. While water was probably present, the oceans of the time may instead have been rolling seas of magma. The name for this period, the Hadean, is borrowed from Hades, the Greek god of the underworld. The moniker’s meaning is obvious: early Earth was a place of death.

Yet it was on this comparatively cursed landscape that –against all odds — life might have emerged. The controversial clue to this incredible notion was made public last fall. Scientists from UCLA showed off apparently biogenic carbon that was locked away inside a near impenetrable crystal for 4.1 billion years.

The oldest rocks on Earth don’t even date back that far, but peculiar minerals called zircons do. The oldest-known zircons, discovered in the Jack Hills of Western Australia, originally crystalized 4.4 billion years ago! It was within one of these zircons that geochemist Elizabeth Bell and her team discovered the carbon they think was produced by life. Life that old, whatever it was, would not have bones, or even a clearly-defined shape, so a true fossil find will probably never be unearthed. Instead, whatever carbon-based life existed back in the Hadean would simply leave traces of itself in the form of carbon itself. Bell’s co-author, Mark Harrison, referred to the stuff as “the gooey remains of biotic life.”

[ click to continue reading at Real Clear Science ]

Posted on September 6, 2016 by Editor

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Gigantic Pain In The Ass Pisses On Polanski

from gamesradar+

20 Most Awkward Movie Sets

Oh the glamour…

By 

Faye Dunaway vs. Roman Polanski

The Movie Set: Polanski’s 1974 masterpiece Chinatown , in which Faye Dunaway gave great smoulder opposite Jack Nicholson’s busted-nose investigator.

The Awkward: It started with Dunaway attempting to understand the motivations of her character. When she asked her director for, uh, direction, he reportedly merely yelled: “Say the fucking words. Your salary is your motivation!”

Worse still, when one of the actress’ stray hairs threatened to ruin a shot, Polanski plucked the offending strand from Dunaway’s head without even considering calling in make-up.

Dunaway got her own back when, after her director refused to let her take a loo break, she threw a coffee cup full of urine in his face. Polanski’s later description of his lead actress as “a gigantic pain in the ass” seems fitting.

[ click to continue reading at gamesradar+ ]

Posted on September 5, 2016 by Editor

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Life Re-written

from Phys.org

Scientists find 3.7 billion-year-old fossil, oldest yet

by Seth Borenstein

Scientists find 3.7 billion-year-old fossil, oldest yetIn this photo provided by Laure Gauthiez, taken in July 2012, a field team examine rocks in Greenland.

Scientists have found what they think is the oldest fossil on Earth, a remnant of life from 3.7 billion years ago when Earth’s skies were orange and its oceans green.

In a newly melted part of Greenland, Australian scientists found the leftover structure from a community of microbes that lived on an ancient seafloor, according to a study in Wednesday’s journal Nature .

The discovery shows life may have formed quicker and easier than once thought, about half a billion years after Earth formed . And that may also give hope for life forming elsewhere, such as Mars, said study co-author Martin VanKranendonk of the University of New South Wales and director of the Australian Center for Astrobiology.

“It gives us an idea how our planet evolved and how life gained a foothold,” VanKranendonk said.

Scientists had thought it would take at least half a billion years for life to form after the molten Earth started to cool a bit, but this shows it could have happened quicker, he said. That’s because the newly found fossil is far too complex to have developed soon after the planet’s first , he said.

[ click to continue reading at Phys.org ]

Posted on September 4, 2016 by Editor

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The Perfect Beekend

from the New York Post

The ‘Beekman Boys’ are back to entice you with farm life

By Michael Starr

The ‘Beekman Boys’ are back to entice you with farm lifeBrent Ridge (left) and Josh Kilmer-Purcell Photo: MARIE HAVENS / PatrickMcMullan.com

“Beekman Boys” Josh Kilmer-Purcell & Brent Ridge (“The Fabulous Beekman Boys” on Cooking Channel), who are regulars on eVine, are hosting a special on the digital network called “The Perfect Beekend” (Sunday at 8 a.m.)

“Beekend” follows the guys — and staffers from their magazine, an offshoot of their lifestyle brand Beekman 1802 — as they immerse themselves for a weekend at Josh and Brent’s farm in upstate Sharon Springs, NY.

Kilmer-Purcell and Ridge also won CBS’ “The Amazing Race” in 2012. Here are a few other factoids about them:

[ click to continue reading at NYP ]

Posted on September 3, 2016 by Editor

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The Coolest Thing About Being a Billionaire – You Can Create Big Explosions!

Posted on September 2, 2016 by Editor

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Russo Bros. Invade China

from Variety

Russo Brothers in Talks With Huayi Brothers for Partnership

by 

Joe and Anthony Russo BrothersDAVID FISHER/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Joe and Anthony Russo, the directors of “Captain America: Civil War,” are in talks for an untitled production partnership with China-based Huayi Brothers Media Corp.

The new company would be a production and financing company to develop high-concept material that focuses on storytelling and strong characters. Huayi Brothers will contribute $250 million for operation, overhead, production development and intellectual property acquisition for mainstream global English-language franchise tentpole films to be distributed worldwide plus $100 million in production funding as well.

Huayi Brothers will have distribution rights in Greater China and South East Asia along with the right to exploit theme park construction, development and operation based on projects from the partnership.

“Captain America: Civil War” grossed $1.15 billion worldwide this year with $407 million domestically and $190 million in China as the top two territories.

The Russo Brothers are also producers on STX Entertainment’s “17 Bridges,” Fox’s “Sex Castle,” Fox 2000’s “Space Runner” and MGM’s remake of “The Thomas Crown Affair.” They are also producing a TV series based on “The Warriors” as a Paramount Television Production in association with Getaway Productions.

[ read full article at Variety ]

Posted on September 1, 2016 by Editor

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