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Hobie (Cat) Alter Gone

from The NY Times

Hobie Alter, Innovator of Sailing and Surfing, Dies at 80

By 
Mr. Alter created the Hobie Cat sailboat, which skims the water like a surfboard.CreditAbdullah Doma/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

Hobie Alter, who was known as the Henry Ford of the surfboard industry for his manufacturing innovations and who used his idle time to create the Hobie Cat, the lightweight, double-hulled sailboat that achieved worldwide popularity, died on Saturday at his home in Palm Desert, Calif. He was 80.

By the time Mr. Alter, a surfer himself, developed the Hobie Cat in the 1960s, he had had great success in developing manufacturing techniques and using breakthrough materials in the production of surfboards. He worked out of a small factory along the Southern California coast, not far from where the famous Killer Dana wave roared.

Only minutes from the beach, Mr. Alter was a familiar figure there, surfboard in tow. But like other surfers, he was frustrated when strong offshore winds were blowing, flattening the majestic wave tubes they so cherish. So he decided to use the time to work on his idea for a downsize version of a catamaran: a small, twin-hulled sailing craft that would skim the waves, not unlike a surfboard. It would give surfers something to do when they could not ride their boards to full exhilaration.

[ click to read full article at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on March 31, 2014 by Editor

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Fahrenheit 1984

from BuzzFeed

9 Video Games Based On Classic Literature

by 

2. Fahrenheit 451 (1984)

Fahrenheit 451 (1984)Via en.wikipedia.org

Mostly text and a few graphics, and set five years after the novel concludes, protagonist Guy Montag is now an agent for the Literary Underground, whose sentries speak to one another in quotes from great books. His mission: break into the New York Public Library where illegal books have been transferred to micro cassette (Hey, it was 1984!) and upload them to the Undergrounds’ Information Network.

Ray Bradbury collaborated with the game’s designers on the script. Carisse McClellan is back as Montag’s partner in crime. There’s also a super intelligent computer named (what else?) RAY.

Enemies: Fireman, 451 Patrols, Electric Hounds.

Weaponry: A lighter called “The Flame of Knowledge.”

Can I Play It? You can download it here, then find a Commodore 64 or make your computer impersonate one.

[ click to read more at BuzzFeed.com ]

Posted on March 30, 2014 by Editor

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You’ve Got Mail In Cleveland

from Silicon Beat

You’ve Got The “You’ve Got Mail!” Guy

Oh, what semi-sweet memories are pouring in this morning.

How many of you have been around long enough to remember not just the 1998 Nora Ephron movie “You’ve got mail” but the upbeat male voice behind the recorded greeting that informed millions of AOL users each morning that someone cared enough about them to send an email? That message has surely been implanted deep in your brain after hearing it ad nauseam for years, right?

Well, as A.C. Club reports today in a post,  the man behind the message is still kicking it in Cleveland:

[ click to continue reading at SiliconBeat.com ]

Posted on March 29, 2014 by Editor

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Atalanta’s Up For Sale

from The Sierra Vista Herald

Bisbee landmark Atalanta’s up for sale

Owner wants to move to Israel

Gallery Image

BISBEE — After 38 years in the business, Old Bisbee business owner Joan Werner is putting Atalanta’s Music and Books up for sale.

Atalanta’s in the old J.C.Penney’s building has been a jumping off point for many local writers and a favorite place to come for book signings by well-known authors like J.A. Jance since Werner opened the doors 18 years ago.

After Werner first bought the building, she has slowly been making changes, renovating it with eco-friendly materials and converting it to solar-power. It is the first business operation in Bisbee to be powered completely by the sun.

She moved to Bisbee on New Year’s Eve in 1974 and went to work for the old chili sauce cannery in Elfrida. Then she started working for Circles Robinson who owned the Red, Black and Green Record Store in the old Woolworth building that had been turned into a mini-mall. She began buying up used books, records and tapes and they split the profit from the sales.

Werner does have a person interested in buying the shop, but nothing concrete yet. She hopes to get $80,000 for it, which includes the first year’s rent and utilities. The space would then be leased year-to-year. Whoever gets it also gets a 7,000-member list of loyal customers.

For more information on Atalanta’s, check out the Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/AtalantasBisbee or contact Werner at (520) 432-9976.

[ click to read full at article at SVHerald.com ]

Posted on March 28, 2014 by Editor

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South Park Does Monty Python

Posted on March 27, 2014 by Editor

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Male Twerking Ain’t Working

from The Washington Post

Which dance moves impress women most?

By Christopher Ingraham

A group of evolutionary biologists looked at the science of bump and grind, and they say they figured out exactly which dance movements catch a woman’s eye.

Researchers at Northumbria University and the University of Gottingen wanted to know what women look for in a dance partner, since “dancing ability, particularly that of men, may serve as a signal of mate quality.” But isolating specific dance moves is difficult — facial attractiveness, body shape and even perceived socioeconomic status play a role in how people judge the dancing ability of their peers.

So the researchers set up an experiment: They recruited 30 men to dance to a drumbeat for 30 seconds. The men were given no specific instructions on how to dance, and their movements were recorded via a sophisticated motion-capture system. Each dancer’s 30-second routine was then used to animate a “featureless, gender-neutral” computer-generated avatar. Researchers asked 37 women to view each of the dancing avatars and rate their performance on a seven-point scale.

They found that women rated dancers higher when they showed larger and more variable movements of the head, neck and torso. Speed of leg movements mattered, too, particularly bending and twisting of the right knee.

[ click to read full article at WaPo ]

Posted on March 26, 2014 by Editor

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Happy Instro

Posted on March 25, 2014 by Editor

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Oderus Urungus Gone

from SPIN

GWAR Frontman Dave Brockie Dead at 50

Richmond, Virginia band’s manager confirmed death of singer, known as Oderus Urungus

Oderus Urungus, David Brockie, GWAR, dead, 50David Brockie performs as Oderus Urungus in 2009 PHOTO BY SPIN

Oderus Urungus, a.k.a. Dave Brockie, the founder and frontman for Richmond, Virginia metal band GWAR, has died at age 50. The Richmond police department confirmed on Twitter that Brockie was found dead in his home. GWAR’s manager, Jack Flanagan, has since corroborated the news.

The cause of Brockie’s death is still unclear. Richmond police told hometown publication Style Weekly they didn’t currently suspect foul play.

“Dave was one of the funniest, smartest, most creative and energetic persons I’ve known,” former Gwar bassist Mike Bishop told Style. “He was brash sometimes, always crass, irreverent, he was hilarious in every way. But he was also deeply intelligent and interested in life, history, politics and art.”

Bishop continued: “His penchant for scatological humors belied a lucid wit. He was a criminally underrated lyricist and hard rock vocalist, one of the best, ever! A great frontman, a great painter, writer, he was also a hell of a bass guitarist. I loved him. He was capable of great empathy and had a real sense of justice.”

[ click to read full obit at SPIN.com ]

Posted on March 24, 2014 by Editor

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Da Plane! Da Plane!

Posted on March 23, 2014 by Editor

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Dorothy Must Peek!

from MTV

‘Dorothy Must Die’ Will Change How You Feel About Oz — Get A Sneak Peek Now

Read three chapters of the upcoming YA book now.

By Brenna Ehrlich

Was the Wicked Witch of the West really that bad, or did she just get a bad rap? Was Dorothy really just a sweet-faced girl from Kansas, or a ruthless dictator? YA author Danielle Paige tackles those questions and more in her upcoming novel, “Dorothy Must Die,” a Oz revival story that makes “Return To Oz” look like a Disney-fied dream.

MTV News is exclusively premiering chapters four through six of the novel today. You can check out chapters one to three on Epic Reads, and the next couple excerpts later this week on Just Jared Jr and Hypable.

“Dorothy Must Die” — which comes just in time for the 75th anniversary of L. Frank Baum’s “The Wizard of Oz” — tells the tale of trailer park resident Amy Gumm, who gets swept away from her dreary life during, you guessed it, a tornado.

Landing in the familiar — albeit fictional — land of Oz, Gumm is surprised to find that it’s not all gumdrops and friendly (and cowardly) lions. Dorothy, along with Glinda, has grown mad with power, and it’s up to Gumm, and The Revolutionary Order of the Wicked, to bring Oz back to its former glory. Oh, yeah, and to off the pig-tailed one once and for all.

“Dorothy Must Die” will hit shelves on April 1 — and the CW soon enough — but you can check out a good chunk below right now-abouts. Read up!

[ click to read “Dorothy Must Die” now ]

Posted on March 22, 2014 by Editor

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Sleepify Genius

from Billboard

Inside Vulfpeck’s Brilliant Spotify Stunt

By 

If you happen to notice your Spotify activity window flooded with plays of Vulfpeck’s latest album “Sleepify,” it is not because of how good the songs are — as a matter of fact, the 10-song set is absolutely silent. The Ann Arbor, Michigan-based funk troupe is using Spotify’s royalty-payment system to fund (and even plot the course of) its upcoming Sleepify Tour.

As band leader Jack Stratton explains in the promo video announcing the crowd-sourced scheme, Vulfpeck plans to go on a tour where every show will be free to the public. To achieve that goal, they are asking fans to stream the silent “Sleepify” album on repeat while they sleep in order to multiply the less-than-a-cent average royalty rate Spotify pays per song play exponentially. Understanding that a song needs to be listened to for at least 30 seconds to register as a play, the tracks on “Sleepify” — cleverly titled “Z” through “Zzzzzzzzzz” — are all 31 or 32 seconds long.

[ click to continue reading at Billboard ]

Posted on March 21, 2014 by Editor

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When Hockey Goalies Didn’t Wear Masks

from imgur

nomask

[ click to view at imgur.com ]

 

Posted on March 20, 2014 by Editor

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$33 million Faberge Egg Found… just sitting there on the fence!

from UPI

$33 million Faberge Egg discovered by scrap metal dealer

CREDIT: Wartski.com

LONDON, March 19 (UPI) — A U.S. scrap metal dealer intending to melt down an ornament for its gold was shocked to discover it was a $33 million Faberge egg, a British expert said.Kieran McCarthy of London jeweler Wartski said the scrap metal dealer, who wished to remain anonymous, bought the gold egg for $13,302 from an antiques dealer about a decade ago and had planned to melt it down and sell the metal, but the project was put on hold when he was unable to find a buyer, the Telegraph reported Wednesday.

McCarthy said the egg stayed in the man’s home until a night in 2012 when he decided to Google “egg” and “Vacheron Constantin,” the name etched on the timepiece inside the egg.

The man discovered a Telegraph article from earlier that year that included an interview with McCarthy and a picture of the egg in his possession.

“He saw the article and recognized his egg in the picture. He flew straight over to London — the first time he had ever been to Europe — and came to see us. He hadn’t slept for days,” McCarthy said. “He brought pictures of the egg and I knew instantaneously that was it. I was flabbergasted — it was like being Indiana Jones and finding the Lost Ark.”

[ click to continue reading at UPI ]

Posted on March 19, 2014 by Editor

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Nobody In Los Angeles Wears Panties

from The Star Tribune

‘Hee Haw’ honeys bared too much for the camera

Article by: C.J. , Star Tribune

Misty Rowe

If there are developments more astonishing than media reports of, gulp, “Hee Haw the Musical,” being, gulp again, Broadway-bound, it is that Harold Crump’s brain has not been picked for story lines.

Over lunch a long time ago when Crump was GM of KSTP-TV, he mentioned working on “Hee Haw,” the CBS country music variety show that ran for 20 years in local syndication.

“The folks from ‘Hee Haw’ would come in twice a year and tape all these segments that we would edit and then package after they left that would turn into the different shows, putting them together with various music acts that came in and performed on the show. They would bring in some technical people from Los Angeles and of course, all the other folks they wanted outside the country music type folks we had in Nashville,” Crump said.

“Mainly this was all the young women, that you saw on there. You remember they had these girls dressed in next to nothing in all the skits and that sort of stuff?” he asked.

“The funny thing is that each time the girls came in I’d have to have a meeting with them on the second day and explain to them that we were having problems getting everything shot as it should be because our cameramen were so distracted by the apparel,” said Crump. “Maybe the lack of apparel,” he corrected himself.

“I explained that while they were in Nashville and while they were at the station, that on the air they had to wear panties. And they kept telling me that nobody in Los Angeles wore panties. I told them, ‘Well, I don’t care about that. In Nashville you have to wear them.’

“They’d be jumping up and down and putting their legs up on props and all sorts of stuff. It’s not that the cameramen had to be so low,” Crump said. “They were being exposed. I thought it was funny that we had to do this every time.”

[ click to read complete article at StarTribune.com ]

Posted on March 18, 2014 by Editor

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A variation on the dos-à-dos binding format

from VISUAL NEWS

A Very Rare Book Opens 6 Different Ways, Reveals 6 Different Books

POSTED BY 

6-way-book

Book binding has seen many variations, from the iconic Penguin paperbacks to highly unusual examples like this from late 16th century Germany. It’s a variation on the dos-à-dos binding format (from the French meaning “back-to-back”). Here however, the book opens six different directions, each way revealing a different book. It seems that everyone has a tablet or a Kindle tucked away in their bag (even my 90 year old grandma), and so it sometimes comes as a surprise to remember the craftsmanship that once went along with reading.

SEE ALSO HOME SWEET TOME: A HOUSE CUT INTO A BOOK

The book, which comes from the Rogge Library in Strängnäs, features devotional texts printed in Germany during the 1550s and 1570s (including Martin Luther’s Der kleine Catechismus). Each of the books is held closed with its own ornate metal clasp, and was probably far more decorative than useful. Just imagine finding where you left off! See more images of this book and other rare examples on the National Library of Sweden’s Flickr page.

[ click to continue reading at VisualNews.com ]

Posted on March 17, 2014 by Editor

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The Most Beautiful Storage Building In The World

from Curbed LA

LA’s Most Beautiful Storage Building Was Also a Speakeasy

by Bianca Barragan

The work of Los Angeles architect Arthur E. Harvey includes some of the city’s most recognizable and storied buildings (the Scientology Celebrity Centre [originally the Château Élysée], the Villa Carlotta), but he’s also behind what was supposedly hailed on its opening as the most beautiful storage building in the world: the American Storage Company Building. Yes, if you’ve been wondering what awesome purpose the 14-story-tall, Deco/Spanish Revival beauty at Beverly and Virgil was designed for, we’ve got news for you: It was built in 1928 as a glamorous repository for people’s overflow belongings. But it does have some excitement in its past; during prohibition, its top floor housed multiple speakeasies, as Eastsider LA wrote about recently. According to a long-ago Curbed tipster, the freight elevators were used to bring guests secretly to the top floor, and there are some remains of what might have been the bandstand still up there. Here’s a brief roundup of the building’s debaucherous past….

[ click to continue reading at Curbed ]

Posted on March 16, 2014 by Editor

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Keith Richards’ “Gus & Me”

from paste magazine

Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards is Writing a Book for Kids

By Chelsea Conte
Rolling Stones' Keith Richards is Writing a Book for Kids

It looks like Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards is back to writing, but not lyrics to songs. He’s penning a children’s book called Gus & Me: The Story of My Granddad and My First Guitar. The book is about Richards’ grandfather Theodore Augustus Dupree, who was in a jazz band and introduced the renowned talent to music at a young age.

“The bond, the special bond, between kids and grandparents is unique and should be treasured,” Richards said in an interview with the Guardian.

[ click to continue reading at paste ]

Posted on March 15, 2014 by Editor

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World’s Most Stunning Libraries

from Fodor’s Travel

BIBLIOTHEQUE NATIONALE DE FRANCE, SITE RICHELIEU

Where: Paris

Originally built in the 18th century, French architect Henri Labrouste renovated the Bibliothèque Nationale’s Richelieu site from 1854 to 1875, after he completed the Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève. The Labrouste reading room now bears his name. The library’s collection includes rare books, illuminated manuscripts, prints, photographs, musical scores, and coins and medals that once belonged to French kings. Since the construction of the Bibliothèque Nationale François-Mitterand, the Richelieu library—undergoing a massive renovation through 2017—now hosts temporary exhibits, often culled from its impressive collections.

[ click to continue reading at Fodor’s ]

Posted on March 14, 2014 by Editor

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Pops’ Sissy Pop

Posted on March 13, 2014 by Editor

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The Scawy Web

from CNN Money

The Deep Web you don’t know about

By Jose Pagliery

deep-web-infographic-btn

NEW YORK (CNNMoney)

What we commonly call the Web is really just the surface. Beneath that is a vast, mostly uncharted ocean called the Deep Web.

By its very nature, the size of the Deep Web is difficult to calculate. But top university researchers say the Web you know — Facebook (FBFortune 500), Wikipedia, news — makes up less than 1% of the entire World Wide Web.

When you surf the Web, you really are just floating at the surface. Dive below and there are tens of trillions of pages — an unfathomable number — that most people have never seen. They include everything from boring statistics to human body parts for sale (illegally).

Related story: Shodan, the scariest search engine on the Internet

Though the Deep Web is little understood, the concept is quite simple. Think about it in terms of search engines. To give you results, Google (GOOGFortune 500), Yahoo (YHOOFortune 500) and Microsoft’s (MSFTFortune 500) Bing constantly index pages. They do that by following the links between sites, crawling the Web’s threads like a spider. But that only lets them gather static pages, like the one you’re on right now.

What they don’t capture are dynamic pages, like the ones that get generated when you ask an online database a question. Consider the results from a query on the Census Bureau site.

[ click to continue reading at CNN Money ]

Posted on March 12, 2014 by Editor

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“A frenzied mustang stampede”

from The LA Times

Rebirth of Jackson Pollock’s ‘Mural’

The landmark painting stands magnificently, no less so after the debunking of a myth regarding its creation

Jackson Pollock's  “Mural,” regarded by some as the most important modern American painting ever made, is the focus of a Getty exhibition opening TuesdayJackson Pollock’s “Mural,” regarded by some as the most important modern American painting ever made, is the focus of a Getty exhibition opening Tuesday. (Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times / March 7, 2014)

By Christopher Knight

Myths die hard. Especially creation myths. Messing with the symbolic origins of a world isn’t something to be undertaken lightly.

Jackson Pollock‘s mammoth 1943 painting “Mural” — nearly 8 feet high, 20 feet wide and covered edge-to-edge with rhythmic, Matisse-like linear arabesques, muscular abstract shapes and piercing voids, all of which he likened to a frenzied mustang stampede — was something entirely new for American art. The great painting represents an early, galvanizing leap toward the emergence of the New York School of Abstract Expressionist art in the aftermath of World War II.

The pivotal painting, owned by the University of Iowa’s Museum of Art, goes on public view at the J. Paul Getty Museum on Tuesday — minus a chunk of its myth. It has been undone by science.

[ click to continue reading at LATimes.com ]

Posted on March 11, 2014 by Editor

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Dum Dum Girls – “Are You Okay” (By Bret Easton Ellis)

Posted on March 10, 2014 by Editor

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Exodus Hollywood

from Variety

Hollywood Continues to Flee California at Alarming Rate

 / Film Reporter / @Variety_DMcNary

James Walton

When Paul Audley took the job as president of FilmL.A. in late 2008, he was astounded to discover that physical production on the $70 million pic “Battle: Los Angeles” wasn’t being done in Los Angeles.

“It stunned me that the movie was shooting in Louisiana, and that the state of California was letting this happen,” he recalls.

In the subsequent five years, the situation has only worsened, despite the film production incentive program California enacted in 2009, which provides for $100 million a year in tax credits for what’s usually 20% of production costs. That’s significantly smaller than programs offered by other states such as New York, which offers $420 million a year in credits for 30% of production costs.

The trend has been mounting for high-profile films set in the Golden State to be filmed almost entirely outside California, due to lucrative tax breaks elsewhere that producers can’t turn down. One key component of new legislation to strengthen California’s incentive program, introduced Feb. 19, would raise to $100 million the current budget cap of $75 million on eligible productions. To drive home the need for state support, attendees at a Feb. 22 rally in Burbank held by Hollywood unionists were handed petitions to send to Sacramento citing that only one of 41 big-budget feature films shot in 2012 and 2013 was shot entirely in California.

The latest example of a locally set runaway is New Line’s upcoming earthquake thriller “San Andreas,” in which a helicopter pilot played by Dwayne Johnson rescues his daughter in San Francisco after a 10.0 quake. Except for six planned days of shooting in San Francisco, the entire $100 million movie will be made in Australia at the Village Roadshow Studios in Gold Coast, Queensland.

[ click to continue reading at Variety ]

Posted on March 9, 2014 by Editor

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Suck On This NASCAR

Posted on March 8, 2014 by Editor

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“The first high-art electronic pop record.”

from The LA Times

Kraftwerk’s ‘Trans Europe Express’ started the musical revolution

Critic’s Notebook: Those relentless thumps in electronic dance music and works by Jay Z, Timbaland and even Katy Perry trace to ‘Tran Europe Express’ by Kraftwerk.

By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic

KraftwerkRalf Hütter, left, Henning Schmitz, Fritz Hilpert and Stefan Pfaffe of Kraftwerk at the Museum of Modern Art on April 10, 2012, in New York City. (Mike Coppola / Getty Images)

Kraftwerk’s “Trans Europe Express” is the most important pop album of the last 40 years, though it may not be obvious

The first high-art electronic pop record, “Trans Europe Express” set the tone for the coming revolution, became one of the central texts of hip-hop, pop and electronic dance music. Recorded in the same few months of mid-1976 when Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak incorporated Apple Computers in Cupertino, “Trans Europe Express” and its predecessors, “Radio-Activity” and “Autobahn,” sparked a similarly massive upheaval with sound.

That it was built by a couple of Germans searching for new ideas in a postwar land longing for a modern reboot makes it even more astonishing and its span of influence more notable.

[ click to continue reading at LATimes.com ]

Posted on March 7, 2014 by Editor

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Ice Virus

from CBC News

Giant virus revived from ancient permafrost

Melting permafrost could unleash new human pathogens

The giant virus obtained from Siberian permafrost was frozen for 30,000 years, but was able to infect an amoeba when it was revived.The giant virus obtained from Siberian permafrost was frozen for 30,000 years, but was able to infect an amoeba when it was revived. (Image courtesy of Julia Bartoli and Chantal Abergel, IGS and CNRS-AMU.)

Scientists have discovered a new type of  virus in 30,000-year-old permafrost and managed to revive it, producing an infection.

Fortunately, the new virus, named Pithovirus sibericum, infects amoebas and is not harmful to humans.

But its ability to become infectious again after so many millenniums is a warning, writes Jean-Michel Claverie at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique at Aix-Marseille University and his colleagues in a new study published Monday.

“The revival of such an ancestral amoeba infecting virus … suggests that the thawing of permafrost either from global warming or industrial exploitation of circumpolar regions might not be exempt from future threats to human or animal health,” they wrote in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Giant DNA viruses, first discovered just 10 years ago, are so big compared with most other viruses that they are visible under a visible light microscope. Before the new virus was discovered, just two families were known.

[ click to continue reading at CBC News ]

Posted on March 6, 2014 by Editor

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Play This All Day Long Today At Work

Posted on March 5, 2014 by Editor

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Hackademia

from The Guardian

How computer-generated fake papers are flooding academia

More and more academic papers that are essentially gobbledegook are being written by computer programs – and accepted at conferences

'I've written five PhDs on Heidegger just this afternoon. What next?'‘I’ve written five PhDs on Heidegger just this afternoon. What next?’ Photograph: Blutgruppe

Like all the best hoaxes, there was a serious point to be made. Three MIT graduate students wanted to expose how dodgy scientific conferences pestered researchers for papers, and accepted any old rubbish sent in, knowing that academics would stump up the hefty, till-ringing registration fees.

It took only a handful of days. The students wrote a simple computer program that churned out gobbledegook and presented it as an academic paper. They put their names on one of the papers, sent it to a conference, and promptly had it accepted. The sting, in 2005, revealed a farce that lay at the heart of science.

But this is the hoax that keeps on giving. The creators of the automatic nonsense generator, Jeremy Stribling, Dan Aguayo and Maxwell Krohn, have made the SCIgen program free to download. And scientists have been using it in their droves. This week, Nature reported, French researcher Cyril Labbé revealed that 16 gobbledegook papers created by SCIgen had been used by German academic publisher Springer. More than 100 more fake SCIgen papers were published by the US Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE). Both organisations have now taken steps to remove the papers.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on March 4, 2014 by Editor

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Famous Movies as Children’s Books by Josh Cooley

from Josh Cooley’s Imgur

Josh Cooley

[ click to view more great work at www.cooley.bigcartel.com ]

Posted on March 3, 2014 by Editor

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Wild Beavers

from The Guardian

Wild beavers seen in England for first time in centuries

Footage of a family of beavers filmed in a Devon river is believed to be the first sighting of its kind in up to 500 years

by Jessica Aldred

Beavers in River Otter, Devon

Two beavers were caught on camera playing at night while a third one (in background) is gnawing a tree on the banks of the River Otter, Devon. Tom Buckley got the footage with a hidden infrared motion sensor camera. Photograph: Tom Buckley/Apex

A family of wild beavers has been seen in the England countryside in what is believed to be the first sighting of its kind in up to 500 years.

Three European beavers (Castor fiber), believed to be adults, have been filmed together on the River Otter in east Devon and can be seen gnawing at the base of trees, grooming themselves and playing together.

Experts said the sighting was “highly significant” as it strongly suggested a small breeding population of beavers now existed outside captivity.

European beavers were once widespread in the UK but were hunted to extinction by the 16th century in England and Wales for their fur, medicinal value and meat.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on March 2, 2014 by Editor

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Bret Zombie Manson

from Variety

Bret Easton Ellis, Rob Zombie Team on Manson Murders Project for Fox (Exclusive)

  / Editor-in-chief: TV /  @Variety_Cynthia

Bret Easton Ellis, Rob Zombie Team

Writer Bret Easton Ellis and director Rob Zombie have teamed with Alcon Television to develop a project for Fox that will revisit the people and events connected to the Manson Family murder spree in August 1969.

The project is envisioned as a limited series, but it is in the very early stages of development with Fox. Ellis is set to write the script and some additional materials. Zombie is on board to direct.

Zombie has long been fascinated by the Manson Family slayings, which left seven people dead in the Los Angeles area. Among the victims were actress Sharon Tate, who was eight and a half months pregnant at the time with the child of director Roman Polanski, and prominent Hollywood hairstylist Jay Sebring.

The killings were so gruesome, and the stories of Charles Manson’s level of control of his drug-addled young followers so disturbing, that Manson was convicted of first-degree murder and conspiracy charges even though he was never found to have committed a homicide himself.

Manson’s clutch of cult followers have been suspected of many other murders during that era. But it was sheer brutality and psychopathic theatricality of the killings (complete with messages written in blood at the crime scenes) unleashed on Aug. 8-9, 1969, that jolted the nation’s psyche.

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Posted on March 1, 2014 by Editor

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