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“Energizing The Magic Machine Anew”

from The New York Times

Spielberg and DreamWorks Energize the Magic Machine Anew

By MICHAEL CIEPLY and BROOKS BARNES

UNIVERSAL CITY, Calif. — In the perfect little town of Paradise, Ohio, a pretty-faced new kid has a crush on the sweet blonde who is showing him around. By the way, the kid is also a space alien, on the run from some other aliens who are anything but pretty.

John Bramley/Dreamworks

After two years in the throes of a financial restructuring, Steven Spielberg and his DreamWorks Studios are back with some typically Spielbergian stuff. And they are starting the next round with the sort of fanciful, scary, sometimes heartwarming movies they know best — and their new distribution ally, Walt Disney Studios, needs most.

The inaugural film from the revamped DreamWorks, “I Am Number Four,” with those hormonal teenagers and nasty aliens — and a heavy “Twilight” element — is set for release on Disney’s Touchstone banner on Feb. 18. Mr. Spielberg is not expected to take a credit on the film, remaining in his executive role. But neither is he taking chances with the first in a string of movies that will inevitably have investors, business allies and the audience watching for his trademark screen magic.

“There’s a lot of him in there,” said Marti Noxon, who is among the writers of “I Am Number Four,” and is perhaps best known for her work on the television series “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” More than once, said Ms. Noxon, she found herself laboring with Mr. Spielberg in a conference room in his adobe-style complex on the Universal Studios lot here in an effort to get the teenagers and aliens just right.

DreamWorks — now owned by Mr. Spielberg and Stacey Snider, with financial backing from Reliance Big Entertainment of India and distribution via Disney — carefully picked the release date. It is the kind of winter slot that has been good to popcorn fare like “Paul Blart: Mall Cop,” which generated over $183 million at the global box office last year, and “Percy Jackson and the Olympians: The Lightning Thief,” which took in $226.4 million in February.

The director of “I Am Number Four,” D. J. Caruso, gave DreamWorks a pair of PG-13 hits, “Disturbia” and “Eagle Eye,” during its unhappy tenure as a partner of Paramount Pictures. The producer is Michael Bay, who mixed teenagers and space creatures for DreamWorks and Paramount in the blockbuster “Transformers” series. In an e-mail, Mr. Bay said he brought the project to Mr. Spielberg, whom he described as a “mentor and friend.”

[ click to read full article at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on October 31, 2010 by Editor

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“I can’t understand why most people believe in medicine and don’t believe in art, without questioning either.” – Damien Hirst

from FAD

Damien Hirst ‘Medicine Cabinets’ Exhibition at L&M Arts NYC

 Damien Hirst ‘Medicine Cabinets’ Exhibition at L&M Arts NYC

I can’t understand why most people believe in medicine and don’t believe in art, without questioning either.
Damien Hirst, 1997

L&M Arts present an exhibition of early medicine cabinets by Damien Hirst. Assembled together for the first time are the seminal Sex Pistols cabinets from 1989. Each cabinet takes its name from one of the twelve title tracks of the legendary 1977 debut punk album “Never Mind the Bollocks, Here’s the Sex Pistols.”

A fully-illustrated catalogue with texts by Arthur Danto, James Frey and Steve Jones, including a catalogue raisonné of the complete medicine cabinets, will accompany the exhibition.

[ click to read full article at FADwebsite.com ]

Posted on October 30, 2010 by Editor

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Wrong-Way Edna

Posted on October 29, 2010 by Editor

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The Automatypewriter

from Up, Not North

A new way to interact with fiction

October 29th, 2010

Introducing the Automatypewriter, a new way to experience interactive fiction! It’s still a little rough around the edges (in particular, you can see that the spacebar sticks a little, and the whole thing needs to be tidied up), but you get the idea: the Automatypewriter is a typewriter that can type on its own, as well as detect what you type on it. By reading what it types to you and responding, it can be used interactively to play a game or participate in a story (in this case, Zork).

Though the medium may be the message, a games platform is only as good as its content. To that end I’m collaborating with novelist, graphic novelistfilmmakercommunity organizer, and award-winning interactive fiction developer Jim Munroe, who is creating custom software specifically tailored to the Automatypewriter.

Why?

Interactive fiction is a great genre that is too often overlooked. By providing a tactile and surprising way to experience these games, I hope to engage a wider audience. More generally, moving the platform to a typewriter highlights the role the user assumes as an “author” in helping to create the story, and not just as a “player.”

Also, the usual hacker reason: because we think it’s cool!

[ click to continue reading at UpNotNorth.net ]

Posted on October 29, 2010 by Editor

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“Hey! Him against me – side by side. Side by side!”

from NBC Philadelphia

Man Shot Dead After Refusing His Turn in Russian Roulette

By TERESA MASTERSON

FILE IMAGE: Getty Images

A group of men were drinking and playing Russian roulette at a party in Delaware last weekend. As if out of a scene from The Deer Hunter, when one of the men refused his turn, another took the gun, pointed it at the man’s head and pulled the trigger.

A bullet was in the chamber for that round of the “game.” The man was shot dead.

Master Sgt. Steven Barnes says the men had been drinking with others Saturday at a house on the 1100 block of West Third Street.

[ click to continue reading at NBC Philly ]

Posted on October 28, 2010 by Editor

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Hell’s Knuckle Duster

from the Financial Times

Hells Angels sue luxury fashion house

ByJonathan Birchall in New York

Published: October 27 2010 01:37 | Last updated: October 27 2010 01:37

The world of edgy high fashion has collided with the legal grit of the Hells Angels motorcycle group in a US lawsuit that accuses the Alexander McQueen fashion house of misusing the Angels’ trademarked winged death’s head symbol.

A complaint filed in federal court in California on Monday by the Hells Angels Motorcycle Corporation alleges that the Alexander McQueen brand, owned by France’s PPR luxury group, breached trademark protections.

[ click to continue reading at FT.com ]

Posted on October 27, 2010 by Editor

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The Return Of Mayor Koch in Mural

from The New York Times

Graffiti of New York’s Past, Revived and Remade

By RANDY KENNEDY

Robert Wright for The New York Times

With “Joan of Arc,” at a warehouse along the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, the graffiti collective Slavery is paying homage to a 1980 work that read “Hand of Doom.”  More Photos »

Anyone who has been lost in the last few weeks around the southern reaches of the Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn could be excused for experiencing a powerful Koch administration flashback. On the wall of a brick warehouse there, visible from the parking lot of a furniture store, a huge mural unfurls itself, a loving, seemingly spray-by-spray re-creation of one of the more infamous pieces of graffiti ever to ride the subway: a 1980 work by the artist known as Seen that covered the length of a No. 6 train car with the ominous phrase “Hand of Doom.”

The original work — among those canonized in Henry Chalfant and Martha Cooper’s 1984 landmark photographic history, “Subway Art” — was a token of its troubled urban times, a reference to the Black Sabbath song of the same title with the words flanked by a hooded executioner and a time bomb. The 21st-century version, on closer inspection, turns out to be a bit gentler and a lot more oblique. It reads “Joan of Arc,” and the hatchet man has been replaced by an armored representation of the martyred French saint.

A few miles away, on a streetfront wall in the Sunset Park section of Brooklyn, a similarly odd example of historical revival has sprung up: a kinetic-looking 1980 piece by the graffiti writer Blade has been recreated, with the five letters of his name changed to read Plato. On a coffee shop wall in Bushwick, a name piece from the same year by the artist known as Dondi has been faithfully resurrected but changed to read Gandhi. And a copy of an early-’80s subway tag by the artist Sin appeared just last week on a row of lockers inside Louis D. Brandeis High School on the Upper West Side, with the addition of a few letters and some philosophical heft; the name is now Spinoza.

[ click to continue reading at the New York Times ]

Posted on October 26, 2010 by Editor

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They’re Coming.

from The New York Times

Humans to Asteroids: Watch Out!

Erik T. Johnson

By RUSSELL SCHWEICKART

A FEW weeks ago, an asteroid almost 30 feet across and zipping along at 38,000 miles per hour flew 28,000 miles above Singapore. Why, you might reasonably ask, should non-astronomy buffs care about a near miss from such a tiny rock? Well, I can give you one very good reason: asteroids don’t always miss. If even a relatively little object was to strike a city, millions of people could be wiped out.

Thanks to telescopes that can see ever smaller objects at ever greater distances, we can now predict dangerous asteroid impacts decades ahead of time. We can even use current space technology and fairly simple spacecraft to alter an asteroid’s orbit enough to avoid a collision. We simply need to get this detection-and-deflection program up and running.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on October 25, 2010 by Editor

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Stephen Elliot’s “Adderall Diaries” for iPad

from The New York Times

Blurring the Line Between Apps and Books

By NOAM COHEN

STEPHEN ELLIOTT, a 38-year-old from San Francisco, just introduced his first piece of software for sale: an app for the iPad and iPhone called the Adderall Diaries.

He’s not exactly a programmer — better to call him a writer. And the app that he conceived looks a lot like an electronic book. That is, most people who buy the app will do so to read the text of “The Adderall Diaries,” his “memoir of moods, masochism and murder” based on his childhood in Chicago group homes, which was published in hardcover last year by Graywolf Press.

But Mr. Elliott says he has good reasons for producing his own iPad app, separate and apart from the e-book version of “Adderall Diaries” that is for sale, say, for the Kindle or the iPad reader from Apple. But those reasons are not the artistic, meta-fictional ones you might suspect — you know, so that when characters enter a bar, you suddenly hear music and a glass dropped by the waiter, or more fancifully, you can make them turn around and go somewhere else.

[ click to continue reading at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on October 24, 2010 by Editor

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The Ecosystem Of Independent Publishing

from Publishing Perspectives 

Small Press Maestro: Jeffrey Lependorf and the Ecosystem of Independent Publishing

By Kate Travers

In 1967 a motley crew of magazine editors including George Plimpton (The Paris Review), Robie Macauley (The Kenyon Review) and Russell Banks (Lillabulero) created the CCLM: Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines. The original mission statement was to support individual magazines and publishing cooperative by organizing regional conferences and offering grant support. Today, that same organization is known by a different name: CLMP, the Council of Literary Magazines and Presses and its mission goes well beyond running conferences and finding sources of funding.

Jeffrey Lependorf, CLMP’s current Executive Director, has been with the organization for almost a decade. In 2001, when CLMP hired Lependorf, the organization was beginning to face the new realities of publishing. It was a time when the Internet had created new challenges and opportunities, while for independent publishers was at a perilous standstill. Many independent publishers it did not have non-profit status and therefore were not receiving any public funding. They were working in a vacuum, unaware of a larger community of support. Lependorf came in and reinvigorated the organization at one of the most critical moments in its history.

Despite CLMP’s immense progress, the organization can always use more help. Next Tuesday, October 26th, CLMP will be holding its annual “WHAT THE SPELL?!” benefit, a celebrity spelling bee to raise awareness and money for CLMP. Last year’s event (covered here by Publishing Perspectives)proved to be quite the spelling battle of the year; this year looks to be no different, with contestants including Francine Prose, Sloane Crosley, James Frey and current champion Ben Greenman.

[ click to read full article at PublishingPerspectives.com ]

Posted on October 23, 2010 by Editor

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Flat Iron Steak Sandwich with Chipotle Mayo

from The Arizona Republic

[ click to continue recipe at AZCentral.com ]

Posted on October 22, 2010 by Editor

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Glee Gets Sexy and Everyone Blames Terry Richardson

from MTV’s Buzzworthy

The Kids From ‘Glee’ Steam Up The Cover Of GQ

Posted 10/19/10 2:25 pm ET by Chris Ryan in CelebrityPhotos


(Credit: Terry Richardson/GQ)

Personally, I remember high school rather fondly. You played some sports, occasionally deigned to do some homework and generally spent a lot of time thinking about friends and video games. But I gotta say, I think I would remember high school even more fondly if it was anything like the way it is depicted in these steamy, Terry Richardson-shot photos of the cast of “Glee” for the new issue of GQ magazine.

Inside, we see rather risqué shots of Cory Monteith (who plays Finn), Lea Michele (Rachel)–in just her underwear and high heels–and Dianna Agron (Quinn) cavorting, gallivanting and generally getting up close and personal with one another, in a high school setting.

[ click to continue reading at MTV.com ]

Posted on October 21, 2010 by Editor

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Father & Son Launch iPhone Into Space & Film It – Cool Dad!!

Posted on October 20, 2010 by Editor

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Vintage Ad Browser

[ click to search the Vintage Ad Browser ]

Posted on October 19, 2010 by Editor

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Mandlebrot Gone

from The New York Times

Benoît Mandelbrot, Novel Mathematician, Dies at 85

By JASCHA HOFFMAN

Published: October 16, 2010

photo by Wolfgang Beyer

Dr. Mandelbrot coined the term “fractal” to refer to a new class of mathematical shapes whose uneven contours could mimic the irregularities found in nature.

“Applied mathematics had been concentrating for a century on phenomena which were smooth, but many things were not like that: the more you blew them up with a microscope the more complexity you found,” said David Mumford, a professor of mathematics at Brown University. “He was one of the primary people who realized these were legitimate objects of study.”

In a seminal book, “The Fractal Geometry of Nature,” published in 1982, Dr. Mandelbrot defended mathematical objects that he said others had dismissed as “monstrous” and “pathological.” Using fractal geometry, he argued, the complex outlines of clouds and coastlines, once considered unmeasurable, could now “be approached in rigorous and vigorous quantitative fashion.”

[ click to read full article at NYTimes.com ]

Posted on October 19, 2010 by Editor

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Charlie Finch on “Il Divino Bambino”

from artnet

WHERE’S THE BABY?

by Charlie Finch

 
My friend, the controversial novelist James Frey, insisted that I come to his art show at McWhinnie Gallery on East 64th Street, so, of course, I was first in the door. Second in the door was Richard Prince, whom I must truthfully confess, I had never actually met before.

James Frey's IL DIVINO BAMBINO

He gave me a sour look, upon learning who I am supposed to be. Back to Jim Frey: he was commissioned by Sotheby’s to contribute an essay to the catalogue for “Divine Comedy,” a contemporary take on Dante’s epic poem, and, as Jim explained to me, “Charlie, I think of myself as an artist, so I have put these texts on panels at McWhinnie and a collector has purchased this unique piece for $95,000 in advance of the show.”

Jim wouldn’t tell me the name of the collector, but challenged me to read the whole text, which I proceeded to do. It begins as a clever pastiche of Dante’s tour, taking Virgil, the great Roman epic poet, on a journey through hell and, then, heaven, which Frey summarizes as a contrast between WalMart (Hell) and Candyland (Heaven).

The explication is felicitous but the kicker lies in the last panel, for here Frey chronicles the death of his infant son in New York Hospital’s neonatal unit in 2008. The end of Frey’s text redounds with his walks through Central Park, hearing the voice of his child. Jim told me, “I think of him every moment,” and I responded, “Jim, you have 16 balls to expose your tragic thoughts on a gallery wall.”

It may seem superfluous, but I, Charlie Finch, spent 47 days in the New York Hospital neonatal until my mother was given the word that there was no hope.

I’m still here, but Jim Frey’s boy is not. I embrace you, friend, for turning him into “art,” for if something is missing, it must be art, love, Charlie.

James Frey, “Il Divino Bambino,” Oct. 13-Nov. 9, 2010, at John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, 50½ East 64th Street, New York, N.Y. 10065


CHARLIE FINCH is co-author of Most Art Sucks: Five Years of Coagula (Smart Art Press).

[ click to read at artnet.com ]

Posted on October 18, 2010 by Editor

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Moscow Morning Motorcycle Commute

Posted on October 18, 2010 by Editor

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James Frey vs Oprah: The Art of Literary Revenge

from The Independent UK

Poison pens: The art of literary revenge

Jilly Cooper has named a goat in her latest novel after a critic who wrote a biting review. She got away lightly…

By Andy McSmith

James Frey vs Oprah

james-frey-vsoprah.jpgThere is no better way to boost sales in the US book market than being featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show, but for James Frey, author of a memoir called A Million Little Pieces, about his recovery from drug addiction, the experience turned nasty after it was revealed that a good part of his book was made up. He was called back on to the show when a sometimes tearful Winfrey demanded to know why “he felt the need to lie”.

Three years later, in 2009, a paperback edition of Frey’s novel Bright Shiny Morning, appeared, with a new section entitled “Chat Show Host” that was not in the original hardback. It described how the protagonist was hauled on to a chat show to be called a liar, and how he later recorded a telephone conversation with the chat show host in which she said that she had written a book that had never been published. When asked if he really had a recording of a phone conversation with Winfrey, Frey replied: “The book is fiction. Interpret it however you want.”

[ click to read full article at The Independent ]

Posted on October 17, 2010 by Editor

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I AM NUMBER FOUR Meets HARRY POTTER On The CARTOON NETWORK

from GOSSIPTEEN.com

Mysterious ‘Tower Prep’ Lands On Cartoon Network

Written by Violet on October 16, 2010 – 6:01 am 


Tower Prep – sounds formal, stuffy and maybe even a little boring – but this prepschool is anything but. The new show on Cartoon Network (not animated, by the way) about gifted teens with supernatural secret abilities is described as a cross between Harry Potter and I Am Number Four.

The show centers around several real teens played by Drew Van Acker,Elise GatienRyan Pinkston and Dyana Liu, who attend a mysterious preparatory high school. Each of them has a secret power and Drew’s character is just discovering what his is – that’s the part that is kind of like ‘I Am Number Four.’ The school itself is a bit like Hogwarts in the sense that it’s only for gifted students. But that’s where the similarities end. The school is kind of creepy and its headmaster is no Prof Dumbledore. Yeah, we said it. We don’t like him.

The four teens spend their time investigating the school’s hidden agenda while trying to escape.

[ click to continue reading at GossipTeen.com ]

Posted on October 16, 2010 by Editor

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“James Frey takes Dante’s Inferno into his own hands…”

from The Rumpus.net

Notable New York, This Week 10/11 – 10/17

CAITLIN COLFORD

ART: James Frey takes Dante’s Inferno into his own hands, driving it in a different directionIl Divino Bambino is Frey’s interpretation of the legendary work. Text from Bambino has been translated onto canvas by Frey and presented in an exhibit of the same name. The part literary and part visual exhibit will take you on a ride through heaven and hell. October 13th – November 9th. Rare Bookstore & Art Gallery, 50 ½ East 64th Street.

[ click to read at The Rumpus ]

Posted on October 15, 2010 by Editor

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I AM NUMBER FOUR Featurette

Posted on October 14, 2010 by Editor

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James Frey’s IL DIVINO BAMBINO Tonight

from NY Art Beat

James Frey “Il Divino Bambino”

poster for James Frey

Starts Today, Closes in 27 days
At John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz Bookseller
Media: PrintsOther

Il Divino Bambino is an exhibition of text based artwork taken from James Frey’s latest mansucript of the same name. Frey’s tale is a contemporary riff on Dante’s Divine Comedy and it offers up a story of his raucous trip through Heaven, Hell and Purgatory with a modern Virgil as a guide. For the exhibition, Frey has transformed his manuscript into a series of artworks: They are equal parts literary manuscript and visual artwork, things to be hung on a wall and read. With Il Divino Bambino, Frey once again gives us a glimpse of his own version of literary and artistic medicine, mixed and mashed-up in the subterranean basement of his wild imagination, a place where truth is stranger than fiction and fiction is a paler version of the truth. If you have ever wanted to see Frey in hell, wander through purgatorial malaise, or bask in the allurements of heaven, you need not go any further than Il Divino Bambino.

[ click to read at NYArtBeat.com ]

Posted on October 13, 2010 by Editor

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Nine Nuggets From The Set of NUMBER FOUR

from Moviefone

Nine Things We Learned on the Set of ‘I Am Number Four’

By Scott Harris

High school can be a rough time for any kid: the peer pressure, the bullying, the hormones and even, on rare occasions, the studying. Sometimes, even for the best of us, the pressures of high school can become overwhelming. But when we visited the set the new DreamWorks action blockbuster ‘I Am Number Four,’ we learned that there’s at least one thing worse than being in high school: being in a high school overrun by murderous alien beasts.

And you thought zits were a big problem.

Based on the young adult novel of the same name by authors Jobie Hughes and James Frey (yes, that James Frey), ‘I Am Number Four’ has been touted as the heir apparent to ‘Harry Potter’ and ‘Twilight’ since before the book was even published. Yet, as insanely popular as both of those series are, neither of them became true mega-hits until the movie adaptations introduced millions of new fans to the books.

[ click to continue reading at Moviefone.com ]

Posted on October 12, 2010 by Editor

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Bart Banksy Simpson Strikes

from Clarín

El grafitero Banksy y una polémica en la apertura de “Los Simpson”

11/10/10 – 10:48

El artista dejó su sello en la apertura del último programa, con una sombría secuencia donde se ve a trabajadores asiáticos produciendo merchandising de la serie animada

El grafitero Banksy, el artista callejero mejor cotizado del mundo, dejó su sello en Los Simpson, y con polémica.

En la última emisión de la serie animada en los Estados Unidos, en lugar del tradicional gag del sofá, cuando la familia Simpson se reúne ante el televisor, lo que ve es una sombría secuencia con decenas de trabajadores asiáticos fabricando merchandising de los personajes en pésimas condiciones laborales.

A lo largo del par de minutos que dura la secuencia se ve cómo los operarios,prácticamente en condición de esclavitud, rellenan las figuras de Los Simpson con pelo de gatos muertos o usan el cuerno de un maltrecho unicornio para perforar los DVD.

Ratas, niños explotados y sustancias tóxicas son otros de los elementos que conforman la banskyana apertura.

[ click to continue reading at Clarín.com ]

Posted on October 11, 2010 by Editor

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James Frey’s ‘Il Divino Bambino’ @ John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz

from John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz

October 13th-November 9th

James Frey: Il Divino Bambino

 

John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is pleased to announce a new exhibition by James Frey, Il Divino Bambino. Il Divino Bambino is an exhibition of text based artwork taken from James Frey’s latest mansucript of the same name.  Frey’s tale is a contemporary riff on Dante’s Divine Comedy and it offers up a story of his raucous trip through Heaven, Hell and Purgatory with a modern Virgil as a guide. For the exhibition, Frey has transformed his manuscript into a series of artworks: They are equal parts literary manuscript and visual artwork, things to be hung on a wall and read. With Il Divino Bambino, Frey once again gives us a glimpse of his own version of literary and artistic medicine, mixed and mashed-up in the subterranean basement of his wild imagination, a place where truth is stranger than fiction and fiction is a paler version of the truth.  If you have ever wanted to see Frey in hell, wander through purgatorial malaise, or bask in the allurements of heaven, you need not go any further than Il Divino Bambino. An opening reception for the author will be held on Wednesday, October 13th, 2010, from 6 to 8 p.m. More details to follow.

[ click to read at John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz ]

Posted on October 9, 2010 by Editor

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WSJ: “A Divine Intervention”

from The Wall Street Journal

A Divine Intervention

By RALPH GARDNER

It made sense that Sotheby’s asked writer James Frey to walk me through “Divine Comedy,” a sale of artworks open to the public through Oct. 19, with the auction house operating more like an art gallery. The show’s three rooms, inspired by Dante’s epic poem, are divided into Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise, with works ranging from African masks to those of Rodin, Warhol, Jeff Koons, and Damien Hirst, loosely reflecting the themes of damnation, suffering and ecstasy.

GARDNER.danteThough only 41 years old, Mr. Frey, who updated Dante’s masterpiece for the show’s catalog, has already visited all three realms during his eventful career. For those familiar with the name but who can’t quite recall its cultural significance, Mr. Frey is the author of “A Million Little Pieces,” the best-selling memoir that turned out to be part fiction, and that Oprah Winfrey, who’d championed it, invited Mr. Frey on her show to apologize. Back in Dante’s time, the price of bad behavior was getting sucked into hell. These days it’s to bow prostrate before a national TV audience and beg for forgiveness, as Mr. Frey did, submitting to his punishment with no more protest than one of Michelangelo’s doomed Sistine Chapel souls.

But since coming out as a hopeless sinner, the author has traveled the fast lane to redemption; there’s no better proof than that Sotheby’s, which is in the science of minimizing rather than encouraging risk, asked the author to contribute his reinvention of the Divine Comedy, entitled “Il Divino Bambino,” and starring an expletive-named protagonist. Since the “Million Little Pieces” debacle, Mr. Frey has written a couple of other bestsellers, is working on a pilot for HBO about the porn industry and can afford to indulge his passion for art. He told me he owns works by several of the contemporary artists, who he also counts as personal friends, featured in the show. If that’s suffering, I want to sign up.

“Art influences me much more than writing does,” he explained. “I can imagine Warhol sitting there,” he continued, of “Repent and Sin No More,” a 1985 silkscreen of just those words against a black canvas (and one more example of Warhol’s genius escaping me) “and having a conversation with somebody, and talking about sex and drugs, and somebody says, “Repent and sin no more.’ ”

” ‘Should I repent and sin no more?’ ” Mr. Frey went on. “My answer is no. I’m very pro sin.”

While I am too—finding virtue, or what masquerades under its name these days, greatly overrated—I can’t say we bonded until we arrived in front of Richard Prince’s “School Nurse,” who looks nothing like my school nurse. Mr. Frey said he has a Prince nurse in his own collection, and while he resisted describing the subject matter on the record, he said the Sotheby’s piece, of a vixen with blood streaming from her operating mask, is tame by comparison.

“That has to stay in my office at home,” he reported. “We have a 5-year-old daughter who sees it all the time and asks what is it. ‘It’s art. It’s like paintings of beautiful women that are 500 years old.’ ” I doubt she bought the explanation. Neither did my daughters when I told them that the Pop Art painting over our mantelpiece of a love goddess—whose face is obscured by a black cloud, but whose breasts are rendered with great elan—was a color-field painting. Like Mr. Frey, my wife informed me when we moved into our new apartment that it was going to reside in my home office. Twenty years later, it still has pride of place in our living room. A member of the family.

I’m not an art critic (which should be obvious by now) but I’ve always enjoyed exhibitions such as “Divine Comedy,” which juxtapose artists from different centuries, since that rarely happens in a museum setting. Seeing your fourth Corot landscape in a row, or even a roomful of Cézannes, has a way of deadening the eye and putting the brain on autopilot. But to have the opportunity to compare Bouguereau’s “L’Amour Vainqueur,” a virtuosic 1886 painting of Cupid and Psyche in flight, sitting side by side with Jeff Koons’s “Cherubs,” a couple of kitschy putti that ought to kill the market in porcelain collectibles for good, flatters both works.

The show also helped me finally to develop an appreciation for Damien Hirst. His “Summer in Siam,” of butterflies fluttering against pale blue sky, suggests that one may as easily encounter paradise on Earth as in heaven. And Will Cotton’s 2010 “Beatrice” proves that goddesses abound in downtown bars where Mr. Frey, who collects Cotton’s work and counts him a friend, explained the artist sometimes finds his models. This one is perched on pink cotton candy and white meringue clouds, a simultaneous tribute to both dessert and female beauty.

Mr. Frey, who was asked to contribute “Il Divino Bambino” by Lisa Dennison, the former director of the Guggenheim Museum, now at Sotheby’s, said he wasn’t paid. “I never charge people to write about art.”

Instead he had the Microsoft word document of “Il Divino Bambino” transferred to canvas, the resulting artworks for sale at John McWhinnie @ Glenn Horowitz Bookseller, a rare-book shop on East 64th Street, starting next week.

If Mr. Frey basted in hell for a while, he seems currently to be basking in the cooling breezes of a more habitable climate. “I asked for the Francken,” he said he joked when Ms. Dennison insisted on some sort of compensation. He was referring to Frans Francken the Younger’s 1635 “Mankind’s Eternal Dilemma— the Choice between Vice and Virtue,” with vice looking far more fun. “They said no.”

[ click to read at The Wall Street Journal ]

Posted on October 8, 2010 by Editor

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Homemade Ricotta

from the Los Angeles Times

[ click for recipe at LATimes.com ]

Posted on October 7, 2010 by Editor

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Terry Richardson Shoots James Franco In Drag

from CBS News

James Franco Poses in Drag for Candy Magazine

Posted by Joyce Lee

James Franco on the cover of “Candy Magazine” (Candy Magazine)

NEW YORK (CBS) James Franco is getting in touch with his feminine side by posing in drag for the fall issue of Candy magazine.

The cover, which was shot by famed fashion photographer Terry Richardson, features the 32-year-old actor in bright blue eye shadow, glossy red lipstick, and chunky jewelry with slicked-back hair.

On its website, Candy hails itself as “the first transversal style magazine ever completely dedicated to celebrating transvestism, transexuality, cross dressing and androgyny, in all its manifestations.”

PICTURES: Stars’ Dramatic Makeovers 

[ click to continue reading at CBSNews.com ]

Posted on October 6, 2010 by Editor

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James Frey in The Seven Circles of Sotheby’s

from The New York Observer

Seven Circles of Sotheby’s Selling

By Alexandra Peer

There were art works by Salvador Dali, Francis Bacon, Auguste Rodin and Jeff Koons, but everyone was watching Padma Lakshmi’s pants. The Top Chef co-host, in impossibly tight coral-colored capris covered in a gold lamé print, cut to the front of a book-signing line at Sotheby’s to glad-hand author James Frey.

What was the occasion for this unlikely mix of literature, reality TV and fine art? “Divine Comedy,” an elaborate themed display of art by the former director of the Guggenheim Museum, now Sotheby’s executive, Lisa Dennison. The exhibition, on view through Oct. 19, invites the visitor to Sotheby’s to tour hell, heaven and purgatory in the form of artworks depicting each, several of the works spectacular or particularly rare. But despite a gimmicky conceit and lighthearted demeanor—”have fun,” urged the wall text, right by a huge crucifix depicting Jesus Christ as a wart-covered frog—the show is very much about money. It represents a new business model for the auctioneer.

Drafted into all this was James Frey, who is co-owner of a Lower East Side art gallery—Half Gallery—and has written several art-catalog essays. He was on hand to sign a limited-edition exhibition catalog that featured his “Il Divino Bambino,” a reinterpretation of Dante’s story. He declined to discuss his compensation, and said he was very surprised at how many people wanted a signed catalog—”I thought I’d do two and be done with it.” Interestingly, the famous dissembler said that his two favorite works in the show were the Francken and the only “fake” chosen for the whole exhibition, a particularly harsh version of the afterlife painted not by a famous artist but by his “follower,” i.e., copycat. “I love the fake Bosch,” he said.

[ click to read full article at The Observer ]

Posted on October 5, 2010 by Editor

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That Crack In My Crack Is Not Mine, Jack

from the Arizona Republic

Man denies cocaine found in buttocks is his

Oct. 4, 2010 04:53 PM / Associated Press 

BRADENTON, Fla. – When sheriff’s deputies allegedly discovered a bags of marijuana and cocaine between a man’s buttocks, they said he gave a quick explanation.

Manatee County deputies said Raymond Stanley Roberts told them “The white stuff is not mine, but the weed is.”

Deputies stopped the 25-year-old Wednesday in Bradenton for speeding. Officers said they smelled marijuana and searched him. That’s when they allegedly found a bag of marijuana between Roberts’ buttocks.

Officers then discovered another bag in there; the report said it contained 27 pieces of rock cocaine.

The Bradenton Herald reported Roberts was arrested for drug possession and has bonded out of jail. The person who answered Friday at a phone number listed for Roberts said it wasn’t his.

[ click to read at AZCentral.com ]

Posted on October 4, 2010 by Editor

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Former Spiderman Arch-Nemesis Addicted to Adderall

from Deadline.com 

James Franco Buys ‘The Adderall Diaries’

By MIKE FLEMING

EXCLUSIVE127 Hours star James Franco has acquired Stephen Elliott’s The Adderall Diaries,which he intends to adapt, direct and star in. The memoir starts off a bit like In Cold Blood, in that a blocked writer turns to a murder trial to get himself going. Elliott, blocked for two years, reports on the trial of Hans Reiser, a computer programmer charged with killing the wife he met through a Russian dating service. Fueled by Adderall, a methamphetamine prescribed to help ADHD sufferers, Elliott’s stream of consciousness prose veers into subjects that include his cruel father, Paris Hilton, and S&M.

Franco takes on this challenge at a time when he is cutting a wide swath as an actor and director. He’ll figure prominently in the Best Actor race for his portrayal as Aron Ralston in the Danny Boyle-directed 127 Hours, and he’s currently starring in Fox’s big budget Planet of the Apes prequel Rise of the Apes, which Fox releases June 24, 2011. He plays Allen Ginsburg in Howl, and completed a role in General Hospital as the evil performance artist Franco.

[ click to continue reading at Deadline.com ]

Posted on October 3, 2010 by Editor

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Stephen J. Cannell Gone

from The LA Times

Stephen J. Cannell, prolific TV producer, dies

Cannell
Stephen J. Cannell, bestselling novelist and Emmy-winning TV producer of hits like “The Rockford Files” and “21 Jump Street,” died at his Pasadena home of complications of melanoma on Thursday. He was 69.

Cannell’s family released the following statement about the producer who wrote for iconic series including “Adam-12,” “Mission: Impossible” and “It Takes a Thief” before founding a company that churned out classic action adventure series “The A-Team,” “The Greatest American Hero” and a string of other franchises:

Cannell, who famously wrote scripts on an old IBM Selectric typewriter, told Success magazine recently that he’d been getting up at 4 a.m. for 40 years to write and that he never tired of the process, even though he’d battled dyslexia as a youngster. (He employed what he called “a mop and pail crew” to clean up his prose.)

“One of my work ethic traits comes from the fact that I absolutely love what I do. I’ve never felt that writing was work,” he told the publication. “I get up every morning, and I’m not going to work, I’m going to play. I get to play cops and robbers.”

His latest novel, “The Prostitutes’ Ball,” the 10th in the Shane Scully series, is set for publication Oct. 12.

[ click to continue reading at the LA Times ]

Posted on October 2, 2010 by Editor

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“If James Frey and Michael Bay Remade ‘Twilight'”

from New York Magazine

I Am Number Four Trailer: If James Frey and Michael Bay Remade Twilight

  • 9/29/10 at 1:45 PM

The teaser trailer has been released for the new sci-fi drama I Am Number Four, a Michael Bay–produced adaptation of the young-adult series by Jobie Hughes and famed A Million Little Piecesfabulist/vocoder-wielding alien James Frey. The primary takeaway? Boys, here is your Twilightsaga. This time, the beautiful high-school outsiders are aliens who’ve fallen to Earth, and hero John Smith (rising Brit Alex Pettyfer, whose American debut in Beastly was delayed from this summer to next March) is simultaneously on the run from extraterrestrial assassins, wooing Dianna Agron from Glee, and discovering telekinetic superpowers that he appears to have stolen from Sookie on True Blood[ click to continue reading at New York Magazine ]

Posted on October 1, 2010 by Editor

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