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Minchin

Posted on October 31, 2017 by Editor

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Taylor-Johnson’s Take On “A Million Little Pieces”

from The Hollywood Reporter

Sam Taylor-Johnson and Aaron Taylor-Johnson to Tackle ‘A Million Little Pieces’ (Exclusive)

by Borys Kit , Tatiana Siegel

Mike Pont/WireImage/Sam Taylor-Johnson, Aaron Taylor-Johnson

CAA has been negotiating the release of the rights of James Frey’s 2003 book from Warners, and the package is expected to be launched at the upcoming American Film Market.

The big-screen adaptation of James Frey’s best-seller A Million Little Pieces is being reassembled, this time as a team-up between husband-and-wife duo Aaron Johnson and Sam Taylor-Johnson.

The 2003 book was once one of the hottest properties in town but became radioactive after Frey was exposed for inventing or embellishing parts of the story that was originally dubbed a memoir. Warner Bros. won the book in a bidding war in 2003 and set it up with producer Brad Pitt and his then-Plan B partners Jennifer Aniston and Brad Grey. Frey wrote the first version of the screenplay.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on October 24, 2017 by Editor

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Cristóbal Vila

Posted on October 21, 2017 by Editor

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‘It’s a Very F*cked Up Time to Be’

from Daily Beast

Michael Stipe Opens Up About R.E.M. and President Trump: ‘It’s a Very F*cked Up Time to Be’

The R.E.M. frontman sat down with Stereo Williams to discuss the 25th anniversary of their celebrated album ‘Automatic for the People’ and the not so shiny happy state of America.

There are certain things Michael Stipe recalls about his most visible years as a rock superstar that give a clear indicator of his paradoxical relationship with icon status. He’s alternately cocky about R.E.M.’s heyday (“we were fucking audacious”) and self-effacingly dismissive about their most celebrated ’90s album (“I feel like I’ve been repeating everything I’ve been saying for the last quarter century”). The band’s Automatic for the People, released 25 years ago in October 1992, was a creative triumph at the height of R.E.M.’s most commercial period. The quartet from Athens, Georgia, had famously risen through the ranks of ’80s college rock to become ’90s pop stars, and frontman Stipe was wrestling with newfound superstardom.

And on a balmy day in the East Village, he’s still wrestling with that fame in hindsight.

“I became extremely famous—suddenly,” Stipe recalls. He smirks when thinking back to when he’d suddenly gone from college rock enigma to Bono-level rock star.

“I used to be able to identify the people that would recognize me walking on the sidewalk in New York,” he muses. “That went from those identifiable music fans or punk rock fans or whatever—to everyone. I went from a singer in a band with a few hits and a core audience—a large core audience—but [after] ‘Losing my Religion’ and the popularity of that video… I was hugely famous and that was weird for me. I’m still and always will be shy. I’ve learned how to deal with it and finish my sentences and talk to people in a regular way, but it was intense.”

[ click to continue reading at Daily Beast ]

Posted on October 15, 2017 by Editor

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Hatchet Throwing, Cool

from AFP via Yahoo!
<h1″>Hatchet throwing a new pastime in America

by Thomas URBAIN

Eatontown (United States) (AFP) – What better, safer way to have fun than drink beer and throw a hatchet?

This is now a thing in America, a new pastime, and it’s spreading.

On a busy Friday night at Stumpy’s Hatchet House in New Jersey, it sounds like this: the thud of the blade sticking into a wooden target, people cheering a good toss, and a bell ringing out when somebody scores a bull’s eye.

Its four founders say this place, which opened 18 months ago, is the first of its kind in the US, although Canada is generally considered the cradle of competitive hatchet-hurling.

Such spots are now found in Chicago, Washington, Nashville and Denver, among other US cities.

Stumpy’s owners are talking about opening another elsewhere in New Jersey and have even started offering franchise arrangements. They hope to have a network of 15 within a year.

“This is the next bowling,” said Kelly Josberger, a former elementary school principal aged 51 who decided to change careers. Like her three partners, she had never before run a business.

[ click to continue reading at Yahoo! ]

Posted on October 14, 2017 by Editor

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Filthy Re-birth

from The New York Times

Can Gowanus Survive Its Renaissance?

Brooklyn’s famously filthy canal is getting cleaned up. A building boom is coming. And not everyone is happy.

By ANDY NEWMAN

Stroller traffic on Carroll Street. Stephen Speranza for The New York Times

“Welcome to Venice Jerko.” The greeting is painted in three-foot-high letters on a brick wall along Brooklyn’s legendarily polluted Gowanus Canal, right across from the canal’s first luxury high-rise and its new waterfront promenade.

One recent sunny Sunday, a party of German seminary students and a pair of hotel publicists gathered for a canoe tour. The seminarians had read about the canal in a German travel guide that promised “a romantic sunset on the water.” The publicists were scouting to see if the boutique hotel, opening a few blocks away, might want to include guided canoe trips.

But as much as the canal zone has been remade already, the next few years promise, or threaten, a different magnitude of change altogether.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on October 13, 2017 by Editor

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Charlie’s Stash

from The Thread

HOW CHARLIE CHAPLIN’S WIFE SAVED HIS BACKYARD FORTUNE

By Sean Braswell

Charlie Chaplin was having lunch in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean when he heard some devastating news on September 19, 1952. The British screen legend and longtime U.S. resident received a telegram aboard the England-bound Queen Elizabeth indicating that he would not be allowed back in America unless he agreed to come before an immigration authority to answer charges of political and moral turpitude. Translation: U.S. authorities thought he was both a communist and an adulterer, which put him into rather a sticky situation in 1950s America.

Chaplin was returning by ship to his native England for the first time in more than 20 years, bringing with him his wife and four children for the worldwide premiere of his latest film. Like many in Hollywood, he had been growing increasingly frustrated with being the target of communist allegations hurled by Sen. Joseph McCarthy and others in Washington. And so Chaplin made a bold decision after receiving the telegram: He would not go back to the U.S. The hitch? Chaplin’s vast Hollywood empire, a fortune amassed over decades of successful motion pictures, lay in his adopted homeland. More than a million dollars also lay buried in his Beverly Hills backyard. How was he to extricate his fortune without returning? To solve his problem, Chaplin turned to the person he trusted more than any other — his fourth wife, and an American citizen — Oona O’Neill Chaplin.

[ click to continue reading at The Thread ]

Posted on October 11, 2017 by Editor

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Virgin Mars

from Business Insider

Richard Branson says he’s 6 months from going to space — but Mars belongs to Elon Musk

by Tom Turula

richard bransonRichard Branson’s private space program Virgin Galactic has long promised to democratize space travel.

After thirteen years of development and setbacks — including a fatal crash, technical difficulties and frequent delays — Richard Branson’s private space program, Virgin Galactic, is soon ready for live action, at least according to Branson himself.

“We are hopefully about three months before we are in space, maybe six months before I’m in space,” the founder of Virgin Galactic, which is part of Virgin Group, told an audience at Nordic Business Forum in Helsinki, Finland last week.

When he received an audience question about who will reach Mars first, he or Elon Musk, Branson made clear he is not as keen on the red star as SpaceX and Tesla’s founder.

“I’m not as passionate about Mars as Elon is. My love for space is about how much it can do for people back here on earth, and that’s what Virgin Galactic is pushing towards.”

[ click to continue reading at Business Insider ]

Posted on October 9, 2017 by Editor

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Kubrick’s Right-hand

from Daily. Beast

Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Speaks: The Personal Toll of Working With a Genius

Leon Vitali’s career spent working alongside Stanley Kubrick is a case study of both selfless devotion and self-destructive mania. He wouldn’t have it any other way.

by

Every serious cinephile is aware of Stanley Kubrick, but far fewer are familiar with Leon Vitali, the English co-star of Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon who, following that performance, became the auteur’s steadfast right-hand man. Doing everything asked of him by the legendarily meticulous filmmaker—from taking notes, creating marketing materials, and color-coding prints, to casting, rehearsing with stars, and acting himself—Vitali was the irreplaceable assistant who helped shepherd to the screen The Shining, Full Metal Jacketand Eyes Wide Shut, even as his vital role in those projects remained largely hidden from the public.

That situation is justly rectified by Tony Zierra’s Filmworker, a superb documentary about Vitali’s career alongside Kubrick that serves as a case study of both selfless devotion and self-destructive mania—as well as a much-deserved celebration of a true artist-behind-the-artist. And according to its subject, it certainly doesn’t overstate how uniquely demanding it was to work with one of cinema’s true geniuses.

“Balance is a word that rarely came into my vocabulary throughout my whole time, whether I was working with Stanley or not,” Vitali chuckles when speaking to me from Los Angeles, two days before Filmworker’s premiere (this Tuesday) at the New York Film Festival. “I’m just one of those people who gets quite emotional once they got locked into something. And some things take on proportions of life and death.” Though he found watching himself on screen in this form “a little bit weird,” he confesses, “I can honestly say it didn’t exaggerate, in any stretch of the imagination, how fraught or tense it could be. Or how time intensive.”

[ click to continue reading at Daily Beast ]

Posted on October 8, 2017 by Editor

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Red-Right 88

from BobFreyMusic.com

BOB FREY

Hey Everybody,

Below is a newly recorded version of my 20-minute (!!) ode to the Cleveland Browns “Red-Right 88”.  It first appeared on my record “Tape From Minnesota” (2004).  I decided to re-record this song, started from scratch and, in addition to new vocals and guitar, I have added, with a little help from my friends, some tasty keys & percussion.  This is a work-in-progress, and I hope to have some violin on there soon.  But, as another Browns season begins, I thought I’d get this version out there.  Enjoy! Hope everybody doing well and, Go Browns!! B
P.S. And- Good Luck to our baseball boys as they chase their record-setting 22nd win in a row!  Jonathan and I have watched just about every game from our comfy Mpls basement.  Cherished Father & Son times… kinda like those described in “Red Right 88”, except Cleveland is winning! B

[ click to check out Bob Frey Music ]

Posted on October 7, 2017 by Editor

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Luca Stricagnoli

Posted on October 6, 2017 by Editor

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AIM Gone

from The Atlantic

AIM Was Perfect, and Now It Will Die

A eulogy for the chatting service, which will shut down on December 15

by ROBINSON MEYER

The logo for AOL Instant Messenger, a yellow running personAxel Heimken / AP

You kids don’t understand. You could never understand.

You walk around in habitats of text, pop-up cathedrals of social language whose cornerstone is the rectangle in your pocket. The words and the alert sounds swirl around you and you know how to read them and hear them because our culture—that we made—taught you how. We were the first generation to spend two hours typing at our closest friends instead of finishing our homework, parsing and analyzing and worrying over “u were so funny in class today” or “nah lol youre pretty cool.”

That thing you know how to do, that cerebellum-wracking attentiveness to every character of the text message and what it might mean—we invented that. But when we invented it, we didn’t have text messages, we didn’t have Snapchat, we didn’t have group chats or Instagram DMs or school-provided Gmail accounts. We had AIM. We had AOL Instant Messenger.

“How did AIM work?” you ask. It was like Gchat or iMessage, but you could only do it from a desktop computer. (Since we didn’t have smartphones back then, its desktop-delimited-ness was self-explanatory.) You could set lengthy status messages with animated icons in them. And iconic alert noises played at certain actions: the door-opening squeak when someone logged on, the door-closing clickwhen they logged off, the boodleoop for every new message.

[ click to continue reading at The Atlantic ]

Posted on October 5, 2017 by Editor

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The Hooker Ripping It Up In Detroit

Posted on October 4, 2017 by Editor

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Kim Gets Screwed Again

from GIZMODO

Supreme Court Declines to Hear Kim Dotcom’s Civil Asset Forfeiture Appeal

by Tom McKay

Former Megaupload chief Kim Dotcom’s long, wild ride through the courts crashed into another setback Monday, with the Supreme Court declining to hear an appeal in the 2012 seizure of his assets in New Zealand.

US prosecutors had charged Dotcom with crimes including racketeering and money laundering related to Megaupload, the file-hosting service they said he operated as a thinly veiled piracy site. In January 2012, New Zealand authorities armed with rifles and tactical gear and accompanied by police helicopters raided his rented mansion at the behest of the US, seizing millions of dollars in property and freezing Dotcom’s overseas bank accounts.

The US government has been trying to get its hands on $40 million of those assets since 2014, saying Dotcom’s web empire profited by $175 million at the cost of some $500 million in stolen intellectual property from the entertainment industry. In 2016, an appeals court ruled the civil forfeiture could move forward because Dotcom never came to the US to contest it—thus making himself subject to “fugitive disentitlement.” That more or less means US courts consider him to have become a fugitive and thus unable to contest the seizures.

[ click to continue reading at GIZMODO ]

Posted on October 3, 2017 by Editor

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Paglia on Hefner

from The Hollywood Reporter

Camille Paglia on Hugh Hefner’s Legacy, Trump’s Masculinity and Feminism’s Sex Phobia

by Jeanie Pyun

With the death of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner on Sept. 27, cultural historian and contrarian feminist Camille Paglia spoke to The Hollywood Reporter in an exclusive interview on topics ranging from what Hef’s choice of the bunny costume revealed about him to the current “dreary” state of relationships between the sexes.

Have you ever been to a party at the Playboy Mansion?

No, I’m not a partygoer! (Laughs.)

So let me just ask: Was Hugh Hefner a misogynist?

Absolutely not! The central theme of my wing of pro-sex feminism is that all celebrations of the sexual human body are positive. Second-wave feminism went off the rails when it was totally unable to deal with erotic imagery, which has been a central feature of the entire history of Western art ever since Greek nudes.

So let’s dig in a little — what would you say was Playboy’s cultural impact?

Hugh Hefner absolutely revolutionized the persona of the American male. In the post-World War II era, men’s magazines were about hunting and fishing or the military, or they were like Esquire, erotic magazines with a kind of European flair.

Hefner reimagined the American male as a connoisseur in the continental manner, a man who enjoyed all the fine pleasures of life, including sex. Hefner brilliantly put sex into a continuum of appreciative response to jazz, to art, to ideas, to fine food. This was something brand new. Enjoying fine cuisine had always been considered unmanly in America. Hefner updated and revitalized the image of the British gentleman, a man of leisure who is deft at conversation — in which American men have never distinguished themselves — and the art of seduction, which was a sport refined by the French.

Hefner’s new vision of American masculinity was part of his desperate revision of his own Puritan heritage. On his father’s side, he descended directly from William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower and was governor of Plymouth Colony, the major settlement of New England Puritans.

But Hefner’s worldview was already dated by the explosion of the psychedelic 1960s. The anything-goes, free-love atmosphere — illustrated by all that hedonistic rolling around in the mud at Woodstock in 1969 — made the suave Hefner style seem old-fashioned and buttoned up. Nevertheless, I have always taken the position that the men’s magazines — from the glossiest and most sophisticated to the rawest and raunchiest — represent the brute reality of sexuality. Pornography is not a distortion. It is not a sexist twisting of the facts of life but a kind of peephole into the roiling, primitive animal energies that are at the heart of sexual attraction and desire.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Editor

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Sun & Peng’s ‘Dogs That Cannot Touch Each Other’

Posted on October 1, 2017 by Editor

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Monty Hall Gone

from DEADLINE

Monty Hall Dies; ‘Let’s Make A Deal’ Host Was 96

by Bruce Haring

TV game show host and creator Monty Hall, the man who took Let’s Make A Deal from a daytime staple into prime time, has died of heart failure in Beverly Hills. He was 96 and died at home. His daughter, Joanna Gleason, confirmed his death to the New York Times. 

The show premiered in 1963 and, with some interruptions, continues to run. Contestants in outrageous costumes try to guess prices and see “what’s behind Door No. 1,” a line that bled into the popular culture.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on September 30, 2017 by Editor

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Taco Bell Garb

from People

Taco Bell Is Launching a Clothing Line with Forever 21

RELATED: The Most Outrageous Taco Bell Menu Items of All Time

You’ll soon be able to wear your fast food pride on your sleeve—literally.

Taco Bell is teaming up with Forever 21 to launch a fashion line which they promise to be “hotter than Diablo Sauce.” We would be frauds (FRAUDS!) if we didn’t admit to kind of loving bargain clothing that displays a love of tacos.

The line, which comes out on October 11, includes a millennial pink pullover sweatshirt with the “Live Mas” logo embroidered on it and a tank top inspired by a fire sauce packet.

So far, the only items we’ve seen are those two pieces—modeled by Brittany Creech and Andrew McBurnie, super fans who you may remember bucked tradition and shot their senior portraits at Taco Bell.

[ click to continue reading at People ]

Posted on September 29, 2017 by Editor

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Baa Baa Land

Posted on September 27, 2017 by Editor

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Real Football

Posted on September 24, 2017 by Editor

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Grace

from Interview

FIVE MINUTES WITH THE LEGENDARY GRACE JONES

By Michael-Oliver Harding

In an early scene of the new documentary Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami, the ferocious songstress and boundary-smashing model—whose prior silver screen highlights include portraying an Eiffel Tower-scaling Bond henchwoman and a centuries-old vampire stripper—signs autographs for fans huddled behind a barricade. One of them asks if she’d ever act in another movie, to which she commandingly answers, “My own!” This sets in motion a globetrotting journey a full decade in the making, acquainting us with Jones’ loved ones while peeling away her enigmatic, larger-than-life persona.

Director Sophie Fiennes is with the avant-pop legend when she delivers powerhouse performances in a Dublin theatre, attends church with her mother and revisits her Pentecostal upbringing in Jamaica, sips Cristal in her hotel room in a fur coat and reconnects with her former co-conspirator (and father to her son) Jean-Paul Goude in Paris. Over the course of the film, the subversive 69-year-old performer—who reminds us men should be penetrated at least once “so they know what it’s like to receive”—reveals herself like she seldom has before. Judging by the outpouring of praise during a post-screening Q&A at the Toronto International Film Festival last week, audiences were relieved that the ageless diva—who once threw her baby shower at the legendary Paradise Garage dressed as a toy soldier—has lost none of her bite or risk-taking spirit.

When Interview meets her the following evening for an expeditious five-minute chat in the dining room of an opulent Yorkville hotel, Jones is feasting on a hearty meal of steak frites. “I have to eat and talk, darling, so I’m afraid you’ll hear my munching on your recorder.” And with that said, Jones proceeded, her wit unimpaired and her laughter as rip-roaring as ever.

[ click to continue reading at Interview ]

Posted on September 21, 2017 by Editor

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Schrader on The Extinction Of The Human Race

from VARIETY

Paul Schrader on the Extinction of the Human Race and His New Film ‘First Reformed’

By Brent Lang

It’s no surprise that Paul Schrader, a filmmaker associated with such dark classics as “Taxi Driver” and “American Gigolo,” has a pessimistic streak. But it’s still bracing to hear him argue that humanity, as we know it, is unlikely to last through the next century.

In an interview at the Toronto Film Festival, Schrader said he believes that global warming is accelerating at such a rate that there’s little that can be done to arrest the ecological changes. His Cassandra-like streak informs “First Reformed,” his new drama that’s been screening to strong reviews at the fall festivals. The film grapples with issues of faith while also sounding a warning about the destruction of the natural world. It follows Ethan Hawke as a small-town priest who toys with becoming a suicide bomber in the service of a radical form of environmentalism. Schrader spoke to Variety about religion in film, working with Hawke, and why he believes the world will be well rid of the human race.

[ click to continue reading at VARIETY ]

Posted on September 20, 2017 by Editor

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Harry Dean Stanton Gone

from Fox News

Harry Dean Stanton dead at 91

Character actor Harry Dean Stanton, who appeared in such films as “Cool Hand Luke,” “Kelly’s Heroes,” “The Godfather Part II” and “Alien,” has died at age 91, Fox News confirmed Friday.

Stanton passed away from natural causes at Cedars-Sinai hospital in Los Angeles.

Before finding fame in Hollywood, the Kentucky native previously served in the Navy during World War II and fought in the Battle of Okinawa. After his service, Stanton pursued acting on-stage in a University of Kentucky production of “Pygmalion.”

Once Stanton moved to Los Angeles to further pursue his craft, he appeared in his first film, “Tomahawk Trail,” in 1957.

Stanton later landed roles in numerous hit films, including “Cool Hand Luke,” “The Godfather: Part II,” and “The Missouri Breaks,” which featured his lifelong friend Jack Nicholson.

Stanton’s film career continued to flourish in the ‘80s with classics, such as “Escape from New York,” “Paris, Texas,” and “Pretty in Pink.”

In 1990, he played an ill-fated private investigator in “Wild at Heart,” which was directed by David Lynch. The filmmaker went on to cast Stanton again in “Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me” in 1992 and “The Straight Story” in 1999.

[ click to continue reading at Fox News ]

Posted on September 17, 2017 by Editor

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Trigonometry Revisited

from PHYS.ORG

Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.

The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry – the study of triangles – by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been hidden until now.

Known as Plimpton 322, the small tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now southern Iraq by archaeologist, academic, diplomat and antiquities dealer Edgar Banks, the person on whom the fictional character Indiana Jones was based.

It has four columns and 15 rows of numbers written on it in the cuneiform script of the time using a base 60, or sexagesimal, system.

“Plimpton 322 has puzzled mathematicians for more than 70 years, since it was realised it contains a special pattern of numbers called Pythagorean triples,” says Dr Daniel Mansfield of the School of Mathematics and Statistics in the UNSW Faculty of Science.

“The huge mystery, until now, was its purpose – why the ancient scribes carried out the complex task of generating and sorting the numbers on the tablet.

“Our research reveals that Plimpton 322 describes the shapes of right-angle triangles using a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles. It is a fascinating mathematical work that demonstrates undoubted genius.

“The tablet not only contains the world’s oldest trigonometric table; it is also the only completely accurate trigonometric table, because of the very different Babylonian approach to arithmetic and geometry.

[ click to continue reading at PHYS.ORG ]

Posted on September 16, 2017 by Editor

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Jim Carrey Awesome

Posted on September 15, 2017 by Editor

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Don Ohlmeyer Gone

from DEADLINE

Don Ohlmeyer Dies: ‘Monday Night Football’ Producer, Former NBC West Coast President Was 72

by Dino-Ray Ramos

Don Ohlmeyer, former NBC West Coast president and the man who transformed Monday Night Football into a pop culture phenomenon, died today at age 72. Sportscaster Al Michaels announced the news during the telecast of the Giants-Cowboys game on NBC’s Sunday Night Football.

Ohlmeyer was born in New Orleans on February 3, 1945 and grew up in Chicago. He began his career with ABC Sports, working on Wide World Of Sports, and was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He also produced Olympics broadcasts.

In 1977, he went to NBC where he worked as the executive producer of the network’s sports division through 1982. He served as EP of NBC’s coverage of the Super Bowl and World Series and created many series including SportsWorld, Games People Play, and produced the made-for-television movie The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story. He expanded sports coverage, introduced innovative production techniques including a 1980 NFL telecast with no announcers.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on September 10, 2017 by Editor

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Pierre Bergé Gone

from Architectural Digest

Remembering Pierre Bergé

The multitalented creative died today at age 86

Pierre Bergé at his retreat in Normandy. / Photo: Pascal Chevalier

Pierre Bergé had no nickname that I know of, but the pugnacious industrialist—a cofounder and longtime pilot, professional and personal, of fashion god Yves Saint Laurent—could have been dubbed Il Magnifico.

Few people juggled so much so well (give or a take a few upsets) as Bergé, who died today, age 86, at his home in Provence. He was a magazine publisher and a restaurateur (I can’t resist his Caviar Prunier outlets). A dynamo since his adventuresome youth—when he was the lover and successful promoter of French artist Bernard Buffet before defecting to Saint Laurent in a coup-de-foudre passion—he founded museums, ran opera houses, chaired foundations, and agitated French politics as an unrepentant Socialist with about as much tact as a hand grenade. He was a literary lion, had his own publishing company, and launched an auction house. He was a pioneering force in AIDS research and treatment in France, and a major figure in combating racism and discrimination. In short, Bergé was a whirlwind, a magician, a man who built mountains as easily as he moved or demolished them.

[ click to continue reading at AD ]

Posted on September 8, 2017 by Editor

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Oral Marley

from the Los Angeles Post-Examiner

Safeguarding Bob Marley with “So Much Things to Say”

BY STEPHEN COOPER

In reviewing Roger Steffens’s latest book, So Much Things to Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley, Hua Hsu asserts in The New Yorker that Steffens’s contribution to the Marley canon is his “nerdish monomania.” But Steffens, who invited me to tour his overstuffed “Reggae Archives” in L.A., epitomizes cool – as does his magnum opus on Marley – right down to its subtle red, green, and gold binding. Moreover, it is Steffens’s avidity and accuracy that allow readers to “really know the man” as Steffens did when he toured with Marley, subsequently devoting his life to safeguarding his legacy. Jamaican poet laureate Linton Kwesi Johnson writes in his introduction to Steffens’s oeuvre, that Steffens shows “how serious Marley was about his art: his single-mindedness and his consummate professionalism.” Steffens’s book exudes those same qualities.

On July 29, 2017, Steffens blessed me with a return invitation to the Reggae Archives to interview him. The topics we discussed included what got him interested in reggae; how his passion for the music developed; The New Yorker’sreview of his new book; the book’s main dramas and themes; and finally, Steffens’s hopes for “So Much Things to Say”’s enduring legacy. What follows is a transcription of our discussion modified only slightly for clarity and space considerations.

[ click to continue reading at LA Post-Examiner ]

Posted on September 6, 2017 by Editor

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Help me, Obi X Kenobi. You’re my only hope.

from Vanity Fair

Why Generation X Might Be Our Last, Best Hope

Caught between vast, self-regarding waves of boomers and millennials, Generation X is steeped in irony, detachment, and a sense of dread. One of their rank argues that this attitude makes it the best suited to preserve American tradition in these dark new days.

by RICH COHEN

Collage of movie posters, album covers, photographs, books, and logos.Some of Generation X’s enduring cultural artifacts.

Demographics are destiny. We grew up in the world and mind of the baby-boomers simply because there were so many of them. They were the biggest, easiest, most free-spending market the planet had ever known. What they wanted filled the shelves and what fills the shelves is our history. They wanted to dance so we had rock ‘n’ roll. They wanted to open their minds so we had LSD. They did not want to go to war so that was it for the draft. We will grow old in the world and mind of the millennials because there are even more of them. Because they don’t know what they want, the culture will be scrambled and the screens a never-ending scroll. They are not literally the children of the baby-boomers but might as well be—because here you have two vast generations, linking arms over our heads, akin in the certainty that what they want they will have, and that what they have is right and good.

The members of the in-between generation have moved through life squeezed fore and aft, with these tremendous populations pressing on either side, demanding we grow up and move away, or grow old and die—get out, delete your account, kill yourself. But it’s become clear to me that if this nation has any chance of survival, of carrying its traditions deep into the 21st century, it will in no small part depend on members of my generation, Generation X, the last Americans schooled in the old manner, the last Americans that know how to fold a newspaper, take a joke, and listen to a dirty story without losing their minds.

[ click to continue reading at Vanity Fair ]

Posted on September 1, 2017 by Editor

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Hyatt’s Gone

from WHAM

40-year-old East Rochester video store to close its doors

by Carlet Cleare

East Rochester, N.Y. – One of the largest and last local video stores in this digital era is closing.

Walking into Hyatt’s Classic Video on West Commercial Street feels a bit nostalgic, with its extensive collection of VHS tapes, DVDs, cassette tapes and VCRs.

Technology has run through Bob Hyatt’s veins since the 1960s, when he started selling home theater equipment out of his house.

“When a lot of the chain stores like Norman Brothers and Century started selling components through catalogs,” Hyatt said, “we saw the handwriting on the wall and we went into video.”

The 85-year-old owned and operated the family video store in East Rochester for 40 years. His four children were also raised in the business.

“We moved into this building on the night of the Ice Storm in 1991,” he said.

Hyatt worked through the struggles of big box competitors and, now, streaming, keeping afloat through converting content on VHS tapes onto DVDs.

At one time, they had 35,000 titles. Now, the Hyatts are closing.

[ click to continue reading at WHAM ]

Posted on August 31, 2017 by Editor

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Lost Languages Found

from The Times of India

Scientists discover lost languages at Egyptian monastery

by Tom Whipple, Science Editor

The library at Saint Catherine’s monastery has been in continuous use for 1,500 yearsThe library at Saint Catherine’s monastery has been in continuous use for 1,500 years / KHALED ELFIQI

Ancient works not read by humans since the Dark Ages have been found at an Egyptian monastery, using a technique that allows researchers to reconstruct documents long ago scrubbed off parchment.

The finds at Saint Catherine’s monastery on the Sinai peninsula hailed a “new golden age of discovery”, according to the scientists behind the research, who believe that the methods could reveal many other lost texts.

They have been chronicling the monastery’s library, which has been in continuous use for 1,500 years, but which is today threatened by growing Islamic fundamentalism and attacks on Christians in the region.

Among the discoveries were three ancient Greek medical texts that were previously unknown to scholars, as well as the earliest copies of some from Hippocrates.

[ click to continue reading at The Times of India ]

Posted on August 28, 2017 by Editor

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Tobe Hooper Gone

from DEADLINE

‘Texas Chain Saw Massacre’ Director Tobe Hooper Dies At 74

by Mike Fleming Jr

Tobe Hooper, one of the pioneers of the horror genre, died Saturday at age 74. He passed in Sherman Oaks. Hooper made two of the most distinguished films in the fright genre. His low budget 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which gave a glimpse of the frightful potential of a power tool, and became a favorite on the drive in theater circuit. Made at a cost of $300,000, the film grossed over $30 million at the domestic box office. He also directed Poltergeist.

Tobe Hooper, one of the pioneers of the horror genre, died Saturday at age 74. He passed in Sherman Oaks. Hooper made two of the most distinguished films in the fright genre. His low budget 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which gave a glimpse of the frightful potential of a power tool, and became a favorite on the drive in theater circuit. Made at a cost of $300,000, the film grossed over $30 million at the domestic box office. He also directed Poltergeist.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on August 27, 2017 by Editor

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Aphex Technical Equipment Supply

from NPR

How A Small Town Record Store Quietly Released An Exclusive Aphex Twin Record

Working away from a cultural capital comes with significant upsides.

by SCOTT STERLING

Well beyond the obvious tropes of Motown, techno and hip-hop icons, evidence of metropolitan Detroit’s reputation as a music city could historically be found within the confines of its record stores. Legendary and sadly long-gone record shops in and around the city were often nearly as important and influential as the music sold in them.

Today, a new crop of budding independent record stores is taking the torch for new and innovative music in southeastern Michigan, none more interestingly than Technical Equipment Supply, which recently made its home in an unlikely place.

Ypsilanti, Mich., is a small Midwestern town of less than 23,000 residents, 36 miles from Detroit and situated just a few miles east of Ann Arbor. “Ypsi” still retains much of it’s mid-20th century charm, and has yet to get caught up in the waves of gentrification sweeping cities across America, primarily in what’s known — both positively and derisively, depending on who’s doing the talking — as “New” Detroit.

[ click to read full article at NPR ]

Posted on August 25, 2017 by Editor

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