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Oil Porn

from Dangerous Minds

ARTIST PAINTS ‘ORGASM FACES’ BASED ON STILLS FROM VINTAGE PORN FILMS 

by Cherrybomb

A painting from artist Alexandra Rubinstein’s series “Looking for Mr. Goodsex.”

In her bio, Russian born Brooklyn-based artist Alexandra Rubinstein notes that she is focused on “crushing the patriarchy one male figure at a time” and boy, do we need you now more than EVER Ms. Rubinstein. Alexandra’s works are quite provocative, to say the least—and even the titles of her work, such as her amusing 2014 series “Men Eating Pussy” which features paintings of men muff diving that was created using vintage stills from pornographic movies, though in Rubinstein’s paintings the female recipient has been replaced by “negative space.”

For this post, I’m going to focus on another one of Rubinstein’s collections “Looking for Mr. Goodsex.” For the 2013/2014 series, Rubinstein painted portraits inspired by un-cropped stills taken from films such as Deep Throat and others that originated during the “Golden Age” of porn.

There’s also a few pictures from one of her most recent accomplishments, a series called “Thirsty” in which the artist reproduced images from vintage Playgirl magazines then covered up the bare crotches of the vintage studs with fully functional, wall-mounted bottle openers. Rubinstein’s goal with “Thirsty” was to convey the role of a woman as a consumer for a change and not the object or vehicle utilized to promote or sell something. Since I’ve mentioned the words “porn” and “pussy” a few times in this post, I hope you’ve arrived at the conclusion that the images in this post are somewhat NSFW.

[ click to continue viewing at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on July 15, 2017 by Editor

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Pieces of Donkeys Who Are Damned

from The New Yorker

The Toscanini Wars

No maestro was more revered—or more reviled. On the hundred and fiftieth anniversary of his birth, it’s time to give him a fair hearing.

By David Denby

What is the most familiar piece of classical music? The most thoroughly roasted chestnut? A piece so overplayed that it has passed into the automatic schlock-recognition zone of every American? Surely it is the final, galloping section of Rossini’s “William Tell” Overture—the Lone Ranger music, the musical image of righteousness on horseback. The music seems almost a joke. But there was one conductor who rode this piece as if his life, and the lives of his players, depended on it.

I remember my parents calling me out of my bedroom. The year was 1952, so I must have been eight. On our television, a tiny black-and-white screen sunk into a large mahogany console, an old man with a full head of white hair and an elegantly clipped mustache was beating time with his right arm and leading a furious performance of the horse music. I certainly knew the tune (“The Lone Ranger” TV series began running in 1949), but I didn’t know it could sound like this—the skittering string figures played with amazing speed and clean articulation, the entire piece brought off with precision and power, the muscular timpani strokes outlining phrases and asserting a blood-raising pressure under the crescendos. You can easily see this performance right now, exactly as I did, on YouTube: Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony in the televised concert of March 15, 1952. If you listen with good headphones, the sound, though hard-edged, is solid and clear, and the astonishing performance comes through. Toscanini was then two weeks shy of his eighty-fifth birthday.

For many years, Arturo Toscanini was the pinnacle of musical excitement for classical-music lovers in this country—and also for many casual listeners, who enjoyed the sensation of having their pulse rate raised. He was at the center of an American experiment in art and commerce that now scarcely seems credible: late in the Depression, in 1937, RCA, which owned two NBC radio networks, created a virtuoso orchestra especially for him, and kept it going until 1954. The NBC Symphony gave concerts in New York that were broadcast on national radio, and then, starting in 1948, on national television.

RCA hyped Toscanini, and the media responded gratefully, some would say shamelessly: Toscanini was widely profiled and photographed, lionized and domesticated by Life and countless other publications. His NBC years were probably the high-water mark of classical music’s popularity in America. Some of that popularity was doubtless swelled by the excruciating and often condescending music explainers ubiquitous on the radio, in books, in schools, all eager to sell great music to the masses. Still, it was not unusual for earnest middle-class children to struggle with an upright at home, to sing Handel in a school chorus, to play Mendelssohn in the school orchestra. At the time, both amateur and professional musicians, listening to the NBC Symphony broadcasts, did their best to play along.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on July 14, 2017 by Editor

Filed under Culture Music Art, Mirth | | No Comments »

Pittacus Rises NYT #2

from Facebook

[ click to view on Facebook ]

Posted on July 12, 2017 by Editor

Filed under Bright Shiny News, Culture Music Art, Literary News | | No Comments »

Our Insane World

Posted on July 11, 2017 by Editor

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Tide Power

from Hakai Magazine

Watts in the Water

Our oceans contain enough energy to power the planet—if we could just get our hands on it.

by Bruce Grierson

Another innovative scheme to draw power from the sea is through underwater kites placed in ocean currents. The idea is to harness the energy produced as the water perpetually pushes the kites into figure-eight patterns. Video courtesy of Minesto

Edinburgh isn’t known as a hotbed of industrial espionage. But one cool and quiet spring night in the Scottish city, a high-stakes burglary was underway. Down at the old port district of Leith, thieves breached a perimeter fence and broke into the offices of a company called Pelamis Wave Power. They homed in on four laptop computers and walked right past much more expensive equipment. Pelamis, at the time (March of 2011), was riding a wave of good fortune. Company engineers had produced the first commercial-scale machine for extracting energy from waves, vaulting Pelamis to top-dog status in the marine-energy industry. Already there was interest from several European utility companies, and a Portuguese company had placed an order. So promising was the technology that just two months earlier, a delegation of 60 Chinese officials had paid a visit, with a juicy investment deal presumably in the balance. The world was getting excited about wave power. The visitors donned white hard hats and Pelamis founder and director Richard Yemm led Li Keqiang, the vice premier of China (now premier), and his charges across the factory floor during a key phase of production. Yemm was likely thinking only of the dizzying future on the other side of so much hard work, so many stillborn dreams. Protecting his company’s valuable intellectual property was not top of mind.

Yemm’s optimism was justified. At some point in 2013, the world’s energy scales tipped: for the first time, more new energy was produced by renewables than by fossil fuels. The shift is officially on. North Sea oil rigs are being dismantled. The run of coal as energy champion of Europe is over, and plans for hundreds of new coal plants across Asia have been shelved. The business case for solar is solid. One hundred percent of Dutch trains run on wind. Google just announced that its server farms and offices will be powered entirely by renewables—mostly wind and solar—by the end of 2017.

And ocean power?

Close to 200 trillion watts of kinetic energy lurk in the seas: more than enough to power the planet, if we could somehow extract it all.

[ click to continue reading at Hakai Magazine ]

Posted on July 9, 2017 by Editor

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More Skull Cult

from Reuters

Tower of human skulls in Mexico casts new light on Aztecs

By Roberto Ramirez | MEXICO CITY

Skulls are seen at a site where more than 650 skulls caked in lime and thousands of fragments were found in the cylindrical edifice near Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City, Mexico June 30, 2017. REUTERS/Henry Romero

A tower of human skulls unearthed beneath the heart of Mexico City has raised new questions about the culture of sacrifice in the Aztec Empire after crania of women and children surfaced among the hundreds embedded in the forbidding structure.

Archaeologists have found more than 650 skulls caked in lime and thousands of fragments in the cylindrical edifice near the site of the Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City.

The tower is believed to form part of the Huey Tzompantli, a massive array of skulls that struck fear into the Spanish conquistadores when they captured the city under Hernan Cortes, and mentioned the structure in contemporary accounts.

Historians relate how the severed heads of captured warriors adorned tzompantli, or skull racks, found in a number of Mesoamerican cultures before the Spanish conquest.

[ click to continue reading at Reuters ]

Posted on July 7, 2017 by Editor

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Skull Cult

from National Geographic

Hints of Skull Cult Found at World’s Oldest Temple

Carved human skull fragments from a Stone Age archaeological site hint at a surprisingly complex culture.

By Shaena Montanari

Göbekli Tepe, site of the possible skull cult, is considerd the world’s oldest temple. PHOTOGRAPH BY VINCENT MUSI, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC CREATIVE

Around 10,000 years ago, the already striking presence of Göbekli Tepe in southeastern Turkey could have been even more impressive—as human skulls might have dangled in what is considered the world’s oldest temple.

According to new research published in Science Advances, three Neolithic skull fragments discovered by archaeologists at Göbekli Tepe show evidence of a unique type of post-mortem skull modification at the site.

(Read more about Göbekli Tepe, the “world’s oldest temple.)

The deep, purposeful linear grooves are a unique form of skull alteration never before seen anywhere in the world in any context, says Julia Gresky, lead author on the study and an anthropologist at the German Archaeological Institute in Berlin. Detailed analysis with a special microscope shows the grooves were deliberately made with a flint tool. One of the fragments even has a hole drilled in it, resembling skull modifications made by the Naga people of India who used the hole to hang the skull on a string.

[ click to continue reading at NatGeo ]

Posted on July 6, 2017 by Editor

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Top 10 Wieners

from The New York Times

We Taste-Tested 10 Hot Dogs. Here Are the Best.

By JULIA MOSKIN

The 10 hot dogs that were part of the taste test, clockwise from top left: Applegate, Nathan’s, Oscar Mayer, Wellshire Farms, Boar’s Head, Trader Joe’s, Niman Ranch, Ball Park, Brooklyn Hot Dog Company and Hebrew National. Credit: Karsten Moran for The New York Times

The New York Times Food department hasn’t taken a close look at hot dogs in some time. Back when hot dogs were on every list of foods to avoid — alarming additives, questionable cuts, salt and fat galore — home cooks didn’t want to know too much about what was in them.

But cooks are different now, and so are hot dogs. We want to know that what we’re eating is as good as it can be. Hot dogs are made from better ingredients, with fewer additives.

One thing hasn’t changed: Billions of hot dogs will be eaten at cookouts this summer, and serving them is one of the easiest ways we know to make people happy.

And so, we present our first official hot dog blind tasting.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on July 3, 2017 by Editor

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The Evel Museum

from NPR

A New Museum Dares To Showcase Stuntman Evel Knievel

by Frank Morris

Half a century ago war, protests, and political scandal rocked the United States. Sound familiar? But, out of all that a small-time hoodlum from Butte, Montana rocketed into national prominence, on a motorbike. Evel Knievel’s career took off like a rocket, but crashed even faster. Now a new museum celebrates all that is Evel.

Robert Craig Knievel was the kind of kid you’d probably medicate these days— an ornery, reckless small town guy always in trouble with the law. He tried lots of careers: mining, insurance, semi-pro hockey, and selling Honda motorcycles, before declaring himself a professional daredevil. He started with a jump over two mountain lions, and a box of agitated rattle snakes. By his late 20s he’d hustled his way into the national spotlight.

“Evel Knievel was an original. And to a lot of people, young people, he was a super hero,” says Brad Zimmerman, director of the Evel Knievel Museum, in Topeka, Kansas.

Evel certainly dressed the part. With his flamboyant red, white and blue, motorbikes, helmets, leather jumpsuits, and, yes, capes, Knievel was part Elvis, part Liberace, part John Wayne.

[ click to continue reading at NPR ]

Posted on July 1, 2017 by Editor

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James Bond’s Evil Penis

from Dangerous Minds

‘THE PENIS IS EVIL!’: SEAN CONNERY & CHARLOTTE RAMPLING IN ‘ZARDOZ,’ THE PLAYBOY SPREAD (NSFW)

Zardoz might be the only movie that can fairly be compared to D-Day, in that if you haven’t endured it yourself, you really haven’t the slightest notion what it’s like.

Zardoz was released in 1974, the second movie that Sean Connery made after leaving Cubby Broccoli’s Bond franchise for good. According to the movie’s director and writer, John Boorman, Connery badly needed money and agreed to do the movie on that basis. He must’ve been really broke.

The movie is 23rd-century romp in which all of humanity is divided up into the lusty and animalistic “Brutals” and the psychic and ethereal “Eternals” at the “Vortex” who have no need to procreate, while a huge flying stone head distributes armaments across the countryside. Sean Connery plays “Zed,” an “Exterminator” who manages to infiltrate the “Vortex,” where he discombobulates the Eternals’ barren notions of sex and violence—or something. Along the way the huge stone head—“Zardoz” to you—memorably bellows the mottos “The gun is good!” and “The penis is evil!” The movie is heady and trashy in a way that only the cinema of the 1970s could possibly muster.

Boorman made several straightforwardly excellent movies, including Excalibur, Hope and Glory, Point Blank, and Deliverance, which makes the eternal peculiarities of Zardoz all the more astonishing.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on June 28, 2017 by Editor

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They’re here…?

from The Sun

Hacking group Anonymous claims NASA is about to announce ‘evidence of alien life’

Last week Nasa announced it had discovered 10 Earth-like planets in the ‘Goldilocks zone’ of other solar systems

By Laura Burnip

HUMANS are about to discover alien life, Nasa believes – according to the latest video from hacktivist group Anonymous.

The hackers published YouTube clip which claims a Nasa scientist made the announcement at the last meeting of the US Science, Space and Technology committee.

It comes after Nasa’s Kepler space observatory discovered 219 “potential new worlds” in other solar systems.

Ten of the planets are “rocky” like the Earth and fall in their systems’ “Goldilocks zone”– so-called because it is not too hot or too cold for life to exist.

In their video, Anonymous claimed head of Nasa Science Mission Directorate Professor Thomas Zurbuchen told the meeting: “Our civilisation is on the verge of discovering evidence of alien life in the cosmos.

[ click to continue reading at The Sun ]

Posted on June 26, 2017 by Editor

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Not So Paranoid Android

from The New Yorker

The Whispered Warnings of Radiohead’s “OK Computer” Have Come True

By Amanda Petrusich

Though Thom Yorke insists that “OK Computer” was inspired by the dislocation of non-stop travel, it’s now understood as a record about how overreliance on technology can lead to alienation.

I’ve noticed a nugget of embarrassment buried in the recent avalanche of critical reappraisals and retroactive interrogations of Radiohead’s “OK Computer,” a record that was released in 1997 and is celebrating its twentieth anniversary this summer. Critics (and some fans) approached its reappearance with trepidation—as if we were all about to be strong-armed into reckoning with our pretentious and over-serious past selves. As if someone had just slid an unmarked manila envelope under the door, and it contained photographic evidence of that one time we Scotch Taped a poster of Nietzsche to our dorm-room ceiling, with instructions to await further notice. Even Thom Yorke, the band’s singer, has been nearly sheepish when discussing its legacy. “The whole album is really fucking geeky,” he recently told Rolling Stone.

To mark the anniversary, the band has just released “OKNOTOK,” which includes a remastered version of the original album, plus eight B-sides and three previously unreleased tracks: “I Promise,” “Man of War,” and “Lift.” (In addition, a special vinyl edition, available in July, will offer a hardcover art book, a collection of Yorke’s notes, a sketchbook of what the band is calling its “preparatory work,” and a cassette tape containing demos and additional session recordings.) None of the extraneous material is exactly revelatory—live versions of “Lift” and “I Promise” have been drifting about the Internet for years—though it does help complete a portrait of a band bucking against itself, and learning how to express its fear effectively.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on June 25, 2017 by Editor

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Space Corps

from Roll Call

House Defense Panel Would Create Space Force

Next stop for the military, outer space? (CQ Roll Call File Photo)

A House Armed Services panel intends to create a new fighting force called Space Corps within the Air Force to improve the U.S. military’s ability to address threats in space, according to a summary of the Strategic Forces panel’s forthcoming fiscal 2018 mark.

“There is bipartisan acknowledgement that the strategic advantages we derive from our national security space systems are eroding,” said a joint statement from Mike D. Rogers of Alabama and Jim Cooper of Tennessee, the panel’s chairman and ranking Democrat, respectively. “We are convinced that the Department of Defense is unable to take the measures necessary to address these challenges effectively and decisively, or even recognize the nature and scale of its problems. Thus, Congress has to step in.”

The Space Corps, they added, would be “a separate military service responsible for national security space programs for which the Air Force is today responsible.”

The panel intends to mark up its portion of the sweeping defense policy measure on Thursday.

Its mark also would establish U.S. Space Command as a four-star position under U.S. Strategic Command.

[ click to continue reading at Roll Call ]

Posted on June 20, 2017 by Editor

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Climate Change Killing Coffee

from BBC

Coffee under threat

Will it taste worse as the planet warms?

By Nassos Stylianou

Coffee beans drying

Coffee drinkers could face poorer-tasting, higher-priced brews, as a warming climate causes the amount of land suitable for coffee production to shrink, say scientists from London’s Kew Gardens.

Coffee production in Ethiopia, the birthplace of the high quality Arabica coffee bean and Africa’s largest exporter, could be in serious jeopardy over the next century unless action is taken, according to a report, published in Nature Plants today.

“In Ethiopia and all over the world really, if we do nothing there will be less coffee, it will probably taste worse and will cost more,” Dr Aaron Davis, coffee researcher at Kew and one of the report’s authors, told the BBC.

[ click to continue reading at BBC ]

Posted on June 19, 2017 by Editor

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Charming Porno

from VICE

Charming Pornographic Photographs of French Prostitutes from the 1930s

by MONSIEUR X AND GEOFFREY LE GUILCER

I talked to collector Alexandre Dupouy about a cache of pictures donated by an anonymous photographer.

This article originally appeared on VICE France. Note: This article contains images with full-frontal nudity.

Alexandre Dupouy is a sex archaeologist. The French collector has spent his entire life collecting what he defines as “erotic and pornographic junk.” His shop, the Tears of Eros—now open only by appointment—has been selling pictures, paintings, and sex objects for almost half a century. It’s a sort of small museum that traces the history of sex in France.

In 1975, he received a call from a bookseller friend who said that he had an old gentleman with “something special to show him.” What he had was a luxury car with a trunk full of black-and-white photographs of naked and smiling prostitutes from the 1930s. He explained that he took most of the pictures in a brothel on the Rue Pigalle. Given that he could feel his days were numbered, the old man agreed to part with the pictures as long as he could remain anonymous. That man became known as “Monsieur X.”

Nearly four decades later, Dupouy has decided to reprint some of this impressive collection as a book called Bad Girls (La Manufacture Books, 2014). The book is co-authored by both Dupouy and Monsieur X. Given that the actual photographer is no longer alive, I decided to have a word with Depouy about the book.

[ click to continue viewing at VICE ]

Posted on June 18, 2017 by Editor

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Underwood Renaissance

from AP

Vintage typewriters gain fans amid ‘digital burnout’

NoneIn this April 23, 2017 photo, vintage typewriters are on display at a “type-in” in Albuquerque, N.M. “Type-ins” are social gatherings in public places where typewriter fans test different vintage machines. The vintage typewriter is making a comeback with a new generation of fans gravitating to machines that once gathered dust in attics and basements across the country. (AP Photo/Russell Contreras)

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Typewriter enthusiasts gather at an Albuquerque restaurant to experiment with vintage Smith Coronas. Fans in Boston kneel in a city square and type stories about their lives during a pro-immigration demonstration. A documentary on typewriters featuring Tom Hanks and musician John Mayer is set for release this summer.

In the age of smartphones, social media and hacking fears, vintage typewriters that once gathered dust in attics and basements are attracting a new generation of fans across the U.S.

From public “type-ins” at bars to street poets selling personalized, typewritten poems on the spot, typewriters have emerged as popular items with aficionados hunting for them in thrift stores, online auction sites and antique shops. Some buy antique Underwoods to add to a growing collection. Others search for a midcentury Royal Quiet De Luxe — like a model author Ernest Hemingway used — to work on that simmering novel.

The rescued machines often need servicing, leading fans to seek out the few remaining typewriter repair shops.

“I haven’t seen business like this in years,” said John Lewis, a typewriter repairman who has operated out of his Albuquerque shop for four decades. “There’s definitely a new interest, and it’s keeping me very busy.”

[ click to continue reading at AP ]

Posted on June 16, 2017 by Editor

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Gaming For Jaguar

from InsideHook

JAGUAR IS HIRING GAMERS TO MAKE THE CARS OF THE FUTURE. APPLY WITHIN.

Solve this puzzle. Get fast-tracked. Prosper.

BY SHARI GAB

Getting a job has come a long way since the days of plastic Help Wanted signs hanging in the window.

For their part, Jaguar is keeping up with the times and the changing global culture as we become an even more connected, digitized civilization: The company just announced an intiative to recruit 5,000 new hires from electronics experts to engineers, and since they are targeting the most tech-savvy candidates, the application involves completing several puzzles and games to enter into the running.

To apply: Download their app (of course), study and solve the skill-testing puzzles, including building a rendering of their upcoming I-PACE concept. If you’re an ace, they’ll call you in. That part’s not so different from traditional job hunting.

[ click to continue reading at InsideHook ]

Posted on June 13, 2017 by Editor

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Mahoney

from The Hollywood Reporter

Meet the High Priest of Hollywood Tattoo Artists

by Gary Baum

Mahoney doesn’t share prices but larger custom pieces cost thousands, depending on the time required.Photographed By Brian Bowen Smith

Johnny Depp calls him brother. Adele and Angelina are clients. After 40 years of body ink, Mark Mahoney, whose style now dominates the craft, has become an icon of the Sunset Strip.

A life spent injecting ink into flesh has taken Mark Mahoney, Hollywood’s most influential and respected tattoo artist, across the human experience. He began tattooing drunk Hell’s Angels beneath a swastika flag in a Massachusetts motorcycle club, then made his way for a time to Manhattan, where he set up shop at the bohemian Chelsea Hotel. (Sid Vicious was a client.) Now, with the fully mainstream acceptance of what was an outlaw aesthetic when he started in the business 40 years ago, he finds his booked-six-months-out appointment calendar filled with green-juice-toting “mothers and their daughters from Beverly Hills. I feel like I’m dreaming.”

Also stars: David Beckham is covered in Mahoney’s work, a fine-line style involving solely black-and-gray ink known as “single needle” that he has popularized — and that a coterie of younger practitioners has propagated on increasingly dewier millennial dermis. Other clients include Adele, Angelina Jolie, Rihanna, Jared Leto and Lana Del Rey, who cast him as her muse in two music videos.

In the past, he offered his services to rivals 2Pac and The Notorious B.I.G. — the latter just days before he was killed. (Quincy Jones has joked that musicians thank “God and Mark Mahoney” at the Grammys; awards season in general is particularly busy for him, with extra house calls and visits to the Four Seasons hotel on Doheny Drive.) Longtime patron and friend Mickey Rourke stopped calling to get together after he couldn’t be squeezed in before a boxing match in Russia. “People have told me he’s gettin’ over it,” says Mahoney. “But it breaks my f—in’ heart.”

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on May 22, 2017 by Editor

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Why Adults Think New Music Sucks

from aeon

Now THAT was music

One grim day (when youth is over) you find that new music gets on your nerves. But why do our musical tastes freeze over?

Some of us are more susceptible than others, but eventually it happens to us all. You know what I’m talking about: the inability to appreciate new music – or at least, to appreciate new music the way we once did. There’s a lot of disagreement about why exactly this happens, but virtually none about when. Call it a casualty of your 30s, the first sign of a great decline. Recently turned 40, I’ve seen it happen to me – and to a pretty significant extent – but refuse to consider myself defeated until the moment I stop fighting.

I’ve been fighting it for more than 10 years now, with varying degrees of vigour and resolve. Sometimes the fight becomes too much – one tires of the small victories that never break open into anything larger – and the spirit flags. I continually if not consistently stay abreast of what’s deemed the best of the new – particularly in rap and rock and R&B (which I stubbornly and unapologetically refer to, like a true devotee of its 1960s incarnation, as ‘soul’). These ventures into the current and contemporary have reaped dividends so small, they can be recounted – will be recounted – with no trouble at all.

But why should I care? Why should any of us care? Maybe it’s about the fear of becoming what we’ve always loathed: someone reflexively and guiltlessly willing to serve up a load of things-were-better-in-my-day, one of the most facile and benighted of all declarations. If you take pride in regarding yourself as culturally current, always willing to indulge the best of everything wherever it’s found, such taste blockages can be pretty frustrating, even embarrassing. And that hoary old consolation for the erectile dysfunction of the slightly older – ‘It happens to everyone’ – is no consolation at all.

[ click to continue reading at aeon ]

Posted on April 26, 2017 by Editor

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The Original Banksy

from The New York Post

The epic rise and disgusting flameout of the artist who ruled 80s New York

By Raquel Laneri

Richard Hambleton / Courtesy of Storyville Films and Motto Pictures

In the early 1980s, a series of shadowy street paintings — life-size monsters and cowboys — loomed large over the East Village. Anticipating the works of Banksy by more than a decade, the unsigned figures were created under cover of darkness on buildings and bridges. They weren’t mere graffiti, but painterly works reminiscent of Jackson Pollock. Downtown residents buzzed about who could be behind them.

The art world knew who it was: a soft-spoken Canadian — often clad in a cravat and sunglasses — named Richard Hambleton.

At downtown galleries, his mysterious figures fetched thousands of dollars more than work by his friends Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring. He attended parties with beautiful women on his arm, and Andy Warhol begged him, in vain, to sit for a portrait.

Hambleton canvased Manhattan with some 450 shadow men — and managed to get a few on the Berlin Wall, too. But by the 1990s, he was largely forgotten, living in a drug den on the Lower East Side. He was so poor that he would shoot himself up with heroin, then use the blood in his needle as paint. At some point, he lost half his nose. (He won’t discuss his health, but he has numerous ailments, including skin cancer.)

But lately, Hambleton, 64, has been emerging from his shadowy existence. Hip galleries have begun showing his work again. He’s recognized as the godfather of street art, and his influence can be seen in the works of painters such as Banksy, Blek le Rat and the Brooklyn duo FAILE. And a documentary about his life and work, “Shadowman,” will debut at the Tribeca Film Festival Friday.

[ click to continue reading at NYP ]

Posted on April 25, 2017 by Editor

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Lonely Cities

from The Week

Will the high-tech cities of the future be utterly lonely?

by Jessica Brown

Maciej Bledowski / Alamy Stock Photo

Humans are inherently social animals, and our health suffers if we’re cut off from social ties. So it’s no wonder the so-called loneliness “epidemic” is being called a public health crisis. But as we sit on the cusp of massive technological advances, the near future could exacerbate this growing problem.

Loneliness can happen to anyone. It is indiscriminate of age, country, and social status. In Britain, more than one in eight people say they don’t consider anyone a close friend, and the number of Americans who say they have no close friends has roughly tripled in recent decades. A large proportion of the lonely are young; almost two-thirds of 16- to 24-year-old Brits said they feel lonely at least some of the time, while almost a third are lonely often or all the time.

One pervasive source of our loneliness is technology. While it offers an easy way to keep in contact with friends — and meet new people through dating and friendship apps — technology’s omnipresence encourages shallow conversations that can distract us from meaningful, real-life, interactions. Researchers at the University of Essex found that having a phone nearby, even if we don’t check it, can be detrimental to our attempts at connecting with others. Smartphones have transformed post office lines from a chance for some small-talk with the neighbors to an exercise in email-checking, and sealed the fate of coffee shops as nothing more than places of mutual isolation. And technology will only become more ingrained in our lives.

[ click to continue reading at The Week ]

Posted on April 24, 2017 by Editor

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Buy a dose, get a brain…

from The Independent

First evidence found that LSD produces ‘higher’ level of consciousness, scientists claim

However the increased brain activity detected is not actually ‘better’, according to the researchers

by Ian Johnston

psychedelic.ala.jpgThe cover of the Incredible String Band’s second LP, released in 1967, showed psychedelia’s influence on music and art Jeff Morgan/Alamy

Scientists claim to have found the first evidence that psychedelic drugs create a “higher level of consciousness”.

LSD, the “date rape” drug ketamine and psilocybin, the activeingredient of magic mushrooms, were all found to increase the tiny magnetic fields produced by the brain.

This is used to create a mathematical measure of the complexity of brain activity, with people who are asleep having a lower level than people who are awake.

Professor Anil Seth, co-director of the Sackler Centre for Consciousness Science at Sussex University, said: “This finding shows that the brain-on-psychedelics behaves very differently from normal.

“During the psychedelic state, the electrical activity of the brain is less predictable and less ‘integrated’ than during normal conscious wakefulness – as measured by ‘global signal diversity’.

However the scientists stressed the higher levels seen in people on the psychedelic drugs did not actually equate to something that was “better”.

[ click to continue reading at The Independent ]

Posted on April 22, 2017 by Editor

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Asteroid Time Machines

from New Scientist

Rocks of ages: How meteorites reveal the solar system’s history

Clever ways to find more space debris, and pinpoint where it came from, will help us rewrite what we know about the solar system’s turbulent youth

By Sophia Chen

meteorite artworkShutterstock

A MAN with a Stetson perched on his head reclines in his chair, an assortment of rocks displayed in front of him. A second man in a fedora browses the collection, pausing over one specimen. The size of a chocolate bar, the silvery rock is inlaid with a mosaic of grainy grey shapes.

“What are you asking for that one?” asks the fedora.

“Oh, somewhere around five thousand,” replies the Stetson.

It’s a routine exchange at the annual Tucson Gem, Mineral & Fossil Showcase in Arizona, a marketplace for international collectors of petrified wood, dinosaur bones, gold and more. Except there’s something special about this rock: it came from space.

[ click to continue reading at New Scientist ]

Posted on April 21, 2017 by Editor

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Dream Center Discovered

from The Guardian

Scientists identify parts of brain involved in dreaming

Experts say findings are ‘astounding’ and could help understand the purpose of dreams and predict whether people are dreaming

by Nicola Davis

Brain scansColoured sagittal MRI scans of the human brain. Changes in brain activity offer clues to what the dream is about. Photograph: Simon Frazer/SPL/Getty Images

Scientists have unpicked the regions of the brain involved in dreaming, in a study with significant implications for our understanding of the purpose of dreams and of consciousness itself. What’s more, changes in brain activity have been found to offer clues as to what the dream is about.

Dreaming had long been thought to occur largely during rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep, a period of slumber involving fast brain activity similar to that when awake, but dreams have also been reported to occur during non-REM sleep, leaving scientists scratching their heads as to the hallmark of dreaming.

“It seemed a mystery that you can have both dreaming and the absence of dreaming in these two different types of stages,” said Francesca Siclari, co-author of the research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the US.

Now it seems the puzzle has been solved.

[ click to continue reading at The Guardian ]

Posted on April 16, 2017 by Editor

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Probert’s Ashes Sent To Penalty Box

from The Washington Post

NHL enforcer Bob Probert’s widow sprinkled his ashes in Red Wings’ penalty box

By Des Bieler

Bob Probert carved out a fearsome reputation as an enforcer, during a lengthy career spent with the Red Wings and Blackhawks, before dying of a heart attack in 2010 at age 45. So with Detroit’s Joe Louis Arena set to host its final game Sunday, Probert’s widow found the perfect way to honor both her husband’s memory and that of the facility in which he performed for nine seasons.

By scattering some of his ashes in the penalty box.

“This is bittersweet for me,” Dani Probert, the widow of 6-foot-3, 230-pound former player, told the Detroit Free Press before Sunday’s game, which featured numerous ceremonies and appearances from several past Red Wings stars. “I have brought some of Bob’s ashes to the game. At Christmas time, I came here with my family and the urn with his ashes and we took a photo of us sitting in the penalty box.”

[ click to continue reading at WaPo ]

Posted on April 14, 2017 by Editor

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Enceladus Alive!

from The Independent

Nasa announces one of Saturn’s moons could support alien life in our solar system

Molecular hydrogen, as found on Enceladus, is one of the essential parts of life on Earth

by Andrew Griffin

There might be alien life in our own solar system, Nasa has announced.

All of the necessary things to support life have been found on one of the moons that orbits Saturn.

Enceladus has chemicals that when found on Earth tend to indicate life, suggesting that there might be living things might be under its icy shell.

Scientists have long thought of Enceladus as one of the prime candidates for life within our solar system or anywhere else nearby, in large part because it is a planetary body with an ocean that covers its entire surface. But the new research gives the best look yet at that moon, showing that it has a chemical energy source capable of supporting life.

[ click to continue reading at The Independent ]

Posted on April 13, 2017 by Editor

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California A-flower

from NBC Los Angeles

Photos: California Bursts With Spring Colors

By Jonathan Lloyd

The hills are alive with the colors of spring. California’s bright colors are in full bloom after one of the state’s wettest winters in years nourished wildflowers, some which had been dormant for years. Check out some of the amazing scenes from the late winter season after a series of storms that pumped life into the Antelope Valley poppy fields, Griffith Park’s hillsides, vast expanses of the Central Valley and the bright fields of flowers near the tiny town of Borrego Springs, where the spectacular wildflower display that has drawn record crowds and traffic. An estimated 150,000 people have visited the town about 85 northeast of San Diego in the past month to see the bright spring colors. The colors are expected to continue in May with different species blooming at different elevations. Send your photos to isee@nbcla.com.

[ click to continue reading at NBC LA ]

Posted on April 12, 2017 by Editor

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Brain Grooves

from Vice

The Encephalophone Is a Real Instrument You Can Play with Your Mind

by Andrea Domanick

Researchers at the University of Washington have found that it may also help treat neurological problems.

Today in Cool Stuff Brought to You by Science, we have the encephalophone—an invention that, despite sounding like a discarded Muppet Show prop, is actually a fascinating new instrument developed for neurological and music research.

The instrument works by translating brain waves through a synthesizer, essentially allowing users to play it with their minds. To do so, a subject wears a cap fitted with electrodes (à la every dystopian sci-fi flick you’ve ever seen) that is connected to a computer synthesizer set up. That in turn produces an array of electronic string, piano, and other instrument sounds based on brain patters. Those patterns, of course, can be tricky to wrangle—notes can be set off by facial movements as well as intended thoughts—but, as with mastering any instrument, musicians and researchers say that’s half the fun.

The device was profiled in the Seattle Times this week for its role in an ongoing project led by Dr. Thomas Deuel at the University of Washington. The Swedish neurologist and musician has been working with the institution’s DXARTS program, which fosters work between scientists and artists. It’s there, while overseeing a lab focused on the relationship between art and neurology, that Deuel and his team have been using the instrument to help treat a local choir director who lost her ability to make music after contracting a viral infection in her brain.

[ click to continue reading at Vice ]

Posted on April 11, 2017 by Editor

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Banksy Snapped With Stencil In-hand…?

from artnet news

Was Banksy Caught on Camera at a Mall in Israel?

Footage made with a phone camera claims to show the elusive artist at work.

Hili Perlson

banksy israelA woman in Israel claims to have caught the elusive artist Banksy on camera. Image via Daily Mail on YouTube

Could this be the last word on one of today’s biggest art mysteries? Has the identity of the world’s most famous street artist Banksy been revealed once and for all?

Several British tabloids, including the Daily Mail, ran stories this weekend showing footage captured with a mobile phone camera by an anonymous woman, who claims to have caught the elusive Bristol-born artist in action, working on a show that’s slated to open to the public tomorrow inside a mall in Herzlyia, Israel.

The 20-second clip shows a man appearing to be in his forties working inside an art space, and holding a stencil in his hand. He’s wearing a white Panama hat, but his spray-paint mask is lowered to his neck, such that his face is fully exposed. The man is seen looking straight at the camera. As soon as he realizes that he is being filmed, he raises his hand to obliterate his face.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on April 10, 2017 by Editor

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Fat Faded F†ck Face

Posted on April 9, 2017 by Editor

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Hirst Returns

from The New York Times

Damien Hirst Is Back With an Underwater Fantasy. Will Collectors Care?

It’s a giant financial gamble for art’s king of controversy, who is trying for a comeback.

By CAROL VOGEL

“Aspect of Katie Ishtar ¥o-landi.” Credit Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2017; Photograph by Prudence Cuming Associates

VENICE — Damien Hirst is staring into the eyes of a jade Buddha, its face seemingly abraded by the vestiges of time. “I think he looks damn good, considering he’s 2,000 years old,” he said, straining to keep a straight face. Nearby, the sculpture of a pharaoh fashioned from blue granite and displaying a gold nipple ring bears an uncanny resemblance to Pharrell Williams.

Is the face really that of the singer? “You could say that,” Mr. Hirst responded. “It’s all about what you want to believe.”

After years of uncharacteristic silence, this artist known for his love-it-or-hate-it artworks is orchestrating his own comeback. On a recent morning, dressed all in black, Mr. Hirst could be found in the soaring entrance of the Palazzo Grassi watching his crew put the finishing touches on an extravaganza worthy of Cecil B. DeMille — his first major show of new work in 10 years. Opening to the public on Sunday, April 9, and called “Treasures From the Wreck of the Unbelievable, it is an underwater fantasy, with sculptures like the Buddha and hundreds of other objects fashioned to look as though they were antiquities dredged up from the bottom of the sea. The works will fill the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta della Dogana, two museums run by François Pinault, the Parisian collector who is also the owner of Christie’s auction house.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on April 8, 2017 by Editor

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Chesty Morgan

from Dangerous Minds

‘DEADLY WEAPONS’: CHESTY MORGAN, THE SECRET AGENT WITH THE 73-INCH BUST

by Heather Drain


Deadly Weapons (1974) trailer by filmow

I can’t exactly remember the first time I saw or became aware of Chesty Morgan. Which is odd, especially since she is best known for her strange assortment of bad wigs and a 73-inch, all natural bust line. It’s like she has always been a part of my life. Like one stoic, large breasted angel, whose face vacillates between confused and languid in Doris Wishman’s surrealistic exploitation film, Deadly Weapons.

Lest there is any question about what type of titular weaponry we are talking about here, the first 30 seconds will immediately set you straight. After a few seconds of some groovy, 60’s rock, a loud drone type noise emerges and then suddenly there’s Chesty, or Zsa Zsa, as she is billed in the film, with her arms outstretched like a menacing breasty crane. The rock soundtrack comes back and then we are treated to Chesty Morgan admiring and vaguely fondling her breasts in a series of modern type, circular mirrors. The psychedelic fun house effect, while maybe not the most sexy thing in the world, is great and fitting. (After all, Deadly Weapons is a keen example of a sexploitation carnival ride, so grab a ticket, strap on your lap-belt and enjoy!)

Chesty stars as Crystal, a successful advertising executive who loves chunky shoes, pantyhose and her jocular, hairy chested lover, Larry (Richard Towers). While the affection is very much shared, Larry’s tied up with some very shady, underworld types, often flanked by Tony (the great Harry Reems) and a balding gent with an eye patch (Mitchell Fredericks) that goes by the name Captain Hook. They pull a hit on one well-connected man, with a powerful little black book. Larry finds it first and slips it into his jacket, in effect pulling a silent double cross on his partners. As you can imagine, his plan does not flesh out well and once he is found out to be a fink, they ice him.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on April 7, 2017 by Editor

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Don Rickles Gone

from The Hollywood Reporter

Don Rickles, Legendary Comic With a Gift for the Insult, Dies at 90

by Mike Barnes , Duane Byrge

“Mr. Warmth” forged a career when he turned the tables on his hecklers, going on to make fun of everyone he encountered — even Frank Sinatra.

Don Rickles, the rapid-fire insult machine who for six decades earned quite a living making fun of people of all creeds and colors and everyone from poor slobs to Frank Sinatra, has died. He was 90.

The legendary comic died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles of kidney failure, publicist Paul Shefrin announced.

Sarcastically nicknamed “Mr. Warmth,” Rickles had mock disdain for stars, major public figures and all those who paid to see him, tweaking TV audiences and Las Vegas showroom crowds with his acerbic brand of takedown comedy. A good guy and devoted husband away from the stage, Rickles the performer heartlessly laid into everyone he encountered — and they loved it.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on April 6, 2017 by Editor

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