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Posted on April 9, 2017 by Editor

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Hirst Returns

from The New York Times

Damien Hirst Is Back With an Underwater Fantasy. Will Collectors Care?

It’s a giant financial gamble for art’s king of controversy, who is trying for a comeback.

By CAROL VOGEL

“Aspect of Katie Ishtar ¥o-landi.” Credit Damien Hirst and Science Ltd. All rights reserved, Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York, 2017; Photograph by Prudence Cuming Associates

VENICE — Damien Hirst is staring into the eyes of a jade Buddha, its face seemingly abraded by the vestiges of time. “I think he looks damn good, considering he’s 2,000 years old,” he said, straining to keep a straight face. Nearby, the sculpture of a pharaoh fashioned from blue granite and displaying a gold nipple ring bears an uncanny resemblance to Pharrell Williams.

Is the face really that of the singer? “You could say that,” Mr. Hirst responded. “It’s all about what you want to believe.”

After years of uncharacteristic silence, this artist known for his love-it-or-hate-it artworks is orchestrating his own comeback. On a recent morning, dressed all in black, Mr. Hirst could be found in the soaring entrance of the Palazzo Grassi watching his crew put the finishing touches on an extravaganza worthy of Cecil B. DeMille — his first major show of new work in 10 years. Opening to the public on Sunday, April 9, and called “Treasures From the Wreck of the Unbelievable, it is an underwater fantasy, with sculptures like the Buddha and hundreds of other objects fashioned to look as though they were antiquities dredged up from the bottom of the sea. The works will fill the Palazzo Grassi and the Punta della Dogana, two museums run by François Pinault, the Parisian collector who is also the owner of Christie’s auction house.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on April 8, 2017 by Editor

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Chesty Morgan

from Dangerous Minds

‘DEADLY WEAPONS’: CHESTY MORGAN, THE SECRET AGENT WITH THE 73-INCH BUST

by Heather Drain


Deadly Weapons (1974) trailer by filmow

I can’t exactly remember the first time I saw or became aware of Chesty Morgan. Which is odd, especially since she is best known for her strange assortment of bad wigs and a 73-inch, all natural bust line. It’s like she has always been a part of my life. Like one stoic, large breasted angel, whose face vacillates between confused and languid in Doris Wishman’s surrealistic exploitation film, Deadly Weapons.

Lest there is any question about what type of titular weaponry we are talking about here, the first 30 seconds will immediately set you straight. After a few seconds of some groovy, 60’s rock, a loud drone type noise emerges and then suddenly there’s Chesty, or Zsa Zsa, as she is billed in the film, with her arms outstretched like a menacing breasty crane. The rock soundtrack comes back and then we are treated to Chesty Morgan admiring and vaguely fondling her breasts in a series of modern type, circular mirrors. The psychedelic fun house effect, while maybe not the most sexy thing in the world, is great and fitting. (After all, Deadly Weapons is a keen example of a sexploitation carnival ride, so grab a ticket, strap on your lap-belt and enjoy!)

Chesty stars as Crystal, a successful advertising executive who loves chunky shoes, pantyhose and her jocular, hairy chested lover, Larry (Richard Towers). While the affection is very much shared, Larry’s tied up with some very shady, underworld types, often flanked by Tony (the great Harry Reems) and a balding gent with an eye patch (Mitchell Fredericks) that goes by the name Captain Hook. They pull a hit on one well-connected man, with a powerful little black book. Larry finds it first and slips it into his jacket, in effect pulling a silent double cross on his partners. As you can imagine, his plan does not flesh out well and once he is found out to be a fink, they ice him.

[ click to continue reading at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on April 7, 2017 by Editor

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Don Rickles Gone

from The Hollywood Reporter

Don Rickles, Legendary Comic With a Gift for the Insult, Dies at 90

by Mike Barnes , Duane Byrge

“Mr. Warmth” forged a career when he turned the tables on his hecklers, going on to make fun of everyone he encountered — even Frank Sinatra.

Don Rickles, the rapid-fire insult machine who for six decades earned quite a living making fun of people of all creeds and colors and everyone from poor slobs to Frank Sinatra, has died. He was 90.

The legendary comic died Thursday at his home in Los Angeles of kidney failure, publicist Paul Shefrin announced.

Sarcastically nicknamed “Mr. Warmth,” Rickles had mock disdain for stars, major public figures and all those who paid to see him, tweaking TV audiences and Las Vegas showroom crowds with his acerbic brand of takedown comedy. A good guy and devoted husband away from the stage, Rickles the performer heartlessly laid into everyone he encountered — and they loved it.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on April 6, 2017 by Editor

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Viva Le Uwe!

from Vanity Fair

Game Over, Uwe Boll

The man known as the world’s worst director is now retired and running a Vancouver restaurant. But he’s still not done waiting for the world to give him his due.

by DARRYN KING
Photographs by 

In a small, cold film studio in early 2016, the man known by the Internet as the “worst director in the world” was doing what he does, well, worst.

“O.K., one more time,” said Uwe Boll (his first name is pronounced “OO-vah”), feeding lines to one of the actors in the absence of a script. “Straight in the lens: ‘. . . has been killed. By the law . . . er . . . the law enforcement? Has been shot by law enforcement.’ Yes. O.K., do it. Ready, and . . . Action!”

“This is the worst-looking set,” assistant director Michael Pohorly admitted between takes. “The budget on this set was . . . nothing. Twenty dollars for a lick of paint? It’s a $20 set.”

Ridge Studios, a former bingoplex in suburban Maple Ridge, Vancouver, had recently accommodated shoots for the Hallmark Channel specials Family for Christmas and Angel of Christmas, a 2016 Kindergarten Copsequel, and the family comedy-drama series Date My Dad. This time last year it was home to Rampage: President Down, the 30th and, for now, final film by Boll. After a failed attempt to crowdfund the film, Boll uploaded a video to YouTube titled “Fuck You All,” in which he abruptly announced his retirement from filmmaking.

[ click to continue reading at Vanity Fair ]

Posted on April 4, 2017 by Editor

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James Rosenquist Gone

from The New York Times

James Rosenquist, Pop Art Pioneer, Dies at 83

By KEN JOHNSON

Mr. Rosenquist’s paintings rarely contained overt political messages, but his best-known work, the enormous “F-111” (1964-5), was a protest against American militarism.“F-111” (1964-5). All Rights Reserved, James Rosenquist/Licensed by VAGA, New York

James Rosenquist, who helped define Pop Art in its 1960s heyday with his boldly scaled painted montages of commercial imagery, died on Friday in New York City. He was 83 years old.

Like his contemporaries Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, Mr. Rosenquist developed a powerful graphic style in the early 1960s that traditionalists reviled and a broad public enthusiastically embraced.

The Pop artists took for their subject matter images and objects from the mass media and popular culture, including advertising, comic books and consumer products. They also employed techniques that until then had been associated primarily with commercial and industrial methods of production, like silk screening or, in Mr. Rosenquist’s case, billboard painting.

Mr. Rosenquist himself drew on his experience painting immense movie billboards above Times Square and a Hebrew National sign in Brooklyn.

It was while working in New York as a sign painter by day and an abstract painter by night that he had the idea to import the giant-scale, broadly painted representational pictures from outdoor advertising into the realm of fine art.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on April 3, 2017 by Editor

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Bob Ross Beats The Devil Database

from The Observer

True Happiness Is Searching Through Bob Ross’ Complete ‘Joy of Painting’ Archive

By

These are dark days. But Bob Ross painted approximately 403 tranquil landscapes for each episode of his long-running, 21-season instructive PBS show The Joy of Painting, each peppered with babbling brooks, cloud-filled blue skies and valleys of happy little trees just so that one day, in your darkest moments, you might glean some happiness from this black world.

The artist and television host died in 1995, but he allegedly produced thousands of artworks in his lifetime, some of which he donated to PBS and others which have since been sold at auction, according to a 2012 investigation from Mental Floss. For fans looking to delve a little deeper into the works Ross created on camera, in real-time, as he painstakingly walked viewers step-by-step through each color and brushstroke so that you too might be able to paint your own masterpiece at home and know the joys of painting firsthand, look no further than Austrian coder and student Felix Auer‘s comprehensive, but “unofficial,” online database TwoInchBrush.

As Hyperallergic’s Claire Voon points out, Ross aficionados can search paintings on the database by color or season, and the site contains a section for guest painters who joined him on the show through the years, such as the artist’s son Steve or his former instructor John Thamm. Auer has gone to such great lengths to make TwoInchBrush a one-stop-shop for Ross fans, that he’s created a guide to the type of brushes the artist used to create his signature happy little trees, cute little bushes and big fluffy clouds, and even includes recommendations for paints, paint thinner, canvases and even palates to use all based on those the artist used most frequently on the show. And now that a trove of Joy of Painting episodes are available to watch in-full on YouTube, Auer includes links to the corresponding paintings in his archive whenever there’s a video available.

[ click to continue reading at Observer ]

Posted on April 1, 2017 by Editor

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Declare Independence

Posted on March 25, 2017 by Editor

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Chuck Barris Gone

from CNN

Chuck Barris, TV game show creator and host, dies at 87

By Madison Park

(CNN)Chuck Barris, best known as host of the TV series “The Gong Show” and creator of “The Dating Game” and “The Newlywed Game,” died Tuesday.

As host of “The Gong Show,” Barris introduced amateur performers to three celebrity judges, who could put a stop to terrible performances by striking the gong. Much like on “American Idol,” awful performances became ratings smash hits. The TV show aired from 1976 to 1980.

While his shows were wildly popular, they were not a hit with critics. Barris was panned as the King of Schlock, Baron of Bad Taste and Ayatollah of Trasherola.
Apart from game shows, Barris found success as a writer. He penned six best-selling books and a 1962 pop song, “Palisades Park,” which became a No. 3 hit in the US for Freddy Cannon.

Barris later wrote in his book “Confessions of a Dangerous Mind,” that he worked as a CIA assassin while working in TV — a claim denied by the agency. The book became a 2002 movie, directed by George Clooney. Sam Rockwell starred as Barris, and the cast included Julia Roberts, Drew Barrymore and Clooney.

[ click to read full obit at CNN ]

Posted on March 22, 2017 by Editor

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Moonbase 2037

from The Independent

Thousands of people could live in space colonies orbiting the Earth in 20 years, expert claims

Space colonists might live longer and eventually grow taller than humans left behind on Earth, Jerry Stone tells The Independent ahead of British Science Festival lecture

by Ian Johnston

spacecolony1.jpgThe colonies would float in space as individual galactic ‘islands’ Rick Guidice/Nasa

Thousands of people could be living in floating space colonies orbiting the Earth in 20 years’ time, according to the head of a project by the British Interplanetary Society (BIS).

And, while life in space might sound unappealing to some, Jerry Stone believe it could actually be healthier than planet Earth, enabling people to live longer and, eventually, grow taller.

Mr Stone, author of the book One Small Step about the moon landings, and other members of the BIS have been updating research carried out in the US in the 1970s into how humans could start living in space in large numbers.

In a speech in Aberdeen as part of British Science Week, Mr Stone will claim humanity is now close to the point where such colonies could be built using material taken from the Moon and asteroids.

[ click to continue reading at The Independent ]

Posted on March 19, 2017 by Editor

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MasterChef Junior

from The Other Cape

We’ll Have What She’s Having

Posted by Heather Atwood

MasterChef Junior contestant Lila DeLuca in her Rockport kitchen. (Photograph by Jonathan Kozowyk)MasterChef Junior contestant Lila DeLuca in her Rockport kitchen. (Photograph by Jonathan Kozowyk)

Late last spring, Lila DeLuca, a braided 10-year-old Rockporter, quietly slipped off to Los Angeles. She reported to her elementary school that she would be accompanying her father, Scott, on an “indefinite business trip.”

This, of course, was cover for the strict code of silence the Fox Broadcasting Company imposes upon its MasterChef contestants — even the juniors.

In her 2016 audition video, DeLuca had proven to the MasterChef Junior talent team that she had the right stuff to be one of the 40 kids qualified to endure — with all due adorableness — celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay’s famously menacing temper and the lofty standards of his co-host Christina Tosi, the high priestess of pastry at New York’s Momofuku Milk Bar.

For the next six weeks, DeLuca would proceed to croûtoncoulis, caramelize, and squeal for joy — like 10-year-olds do. While the show has concluding taping and the results are in, DeLuca is prohibited from sharing any of the juicy details. But she can say that, yes, there was school (as California laws require). And there were field trips, intended to keep young minds working in between the intensity of shooting, and, of course, there was the once-in-a-lifetime experience of being on the set of a nationally-televised, wildly-popular TV show.

[ click to continue reading at The Other Cape ]

Posted on March 10, 2017 by Editor

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Full D5 4412

Posted on March 7, 2017 by Editor

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50 Shades of Vanilla Shitstorm

from Inside Hook

21 EROTIC FILMS HOTTER THAN THE VANILLA SH*TSTORM THAT IS ‘50 SHADES DARKER’

Might wanna put the kids to bed before turning these films on

BY SHARI GAB

Occasionally, a movie comes along that takes all accepted facts about a given event, era, lifestyle or historical figure and throws them out the window. Michael Bay’s Pearl Harbor comes to mind.

And now we’ve got 50 Shades Darker, and its laughable depictions of the wide and wonderful world of kink. Because nevermind that the entire film is based on narrative tropes from the 1950s, the storyline isn’t provocative in the least, and the multimillionaire protagonist drives an upper-middle class Audi R8 Spyder. We ain’t buying that, and neither would he.

What really irks is the flick’s problematic (and wildly innacurate) portrayal of BDSM, where emotional bargaining qualifies as consent and fetishism parallels not with pleasure, but pathology. And as if that wasn’t all enough to make one throw actual rotten tomatoes at the screen, the sex is really mundane. The second in a trilogy, it’s perhaps the only time you’ll hear me say “We really don’t need to go a third time.”

So save yourself from the damp washcloth that is 50 Shades and enjoy these 21 films that got BDSM right.

[ click to continue reading at Inside Hook ]

Posted on March 3, 2017 by Editor

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Why All Boys Wish They Were Rock Stars at Some Point

Posted on February 28, 2017 by Editor

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AMERICAN GOTHIC to Japan

from Broadway World

CBS Studios International Announces Licensing Agreement with WOWWOW in Japan

CBS Studios International announced today a multi-title content licensing agreement with Japan’s leading premium pay TV provider, WOWOW. The agreement includes the first-window broadcast rights to the highly anticipated new TWIN PEAKS; the #1 new U.S. drama BULL, starring Michael Weatherly; and the murder-mystery series AMERICAN GOTHIC.

BULL, TWIN PEAKS and AMERICAN GOTHIC will be shown on WOWOW’s Prime channel, joining other Showtime and CBS programming, including the critically-acclaimed THE AFFAIR, the event series ZOO and the modern-day SHERLOCK Holmes drama, ELEMENTARY.

“The series in this agreement represent the strength and variety of CBS and Showtime programming available to broadcasters around the world,” said Barry Chamberlain, President of Sales, CBS Studios International. “We are thrilled to have expanded our portfolio of programming with WOWOW, bringing more of our compelling and creative storytelling to audiences across Japan.”

AMERICAN GOTHIC centers on a prominent Boston family reeling in the wake of the chilling discovery that someone in their midst is linked to an infamous string of murders. As shocking secrets from the past and present are revealed, their mounting SUSPICION and paranoia that one of them is a killer threatens to tear THE FAMILY apart.

AMERICAN GOTHIC is executive produced by Corinne Brinkerhoff, Justin Falvey, Darryl Frank, James Frey and Todd Cohen, produced by CBS Television Studios and distributed internationally by CBS Studios International.

[ click to continue reading at Broadway World ]

Posted on February 26, 2017 by Editor

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Would have been spectacular…

from Artsy

These 10 Unrealized Artworks Would Have Been Spectacular

BY ABIGAIL CAIN

Image by James Corner Field Operations, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, and Jeff Koons. Courtesy of Friends of the High Line.

Jeff Koons, Train

So far, all attempts to realize Koons’s 161-foot-tall sculpture have run out of steam. The American artist first proposed the work—a full-size replica of a 1940s locomotive, suspended nose-down from a crane while periodically spinning its wheels and belching smoke—to French billionaire art collector François Pinault in the early 2000s. But when Pinault’s plans for a museum on the Seine fell through in 2005, Koons’s idea was once again up for grabs. Both LACMA and Friends of the High Line expressed interest in the massive work; in fact, LACMA spent more than $2 million in feasibility studies, finally determining that Train “was safe, possible, and more complicated than anyone thought.” The High Line picked up the project in 2008 and again in 2012, only to see it derail both times. The likely culprit: an estimated cost of $25 million to $50 million.

[ click to view rest of list at artsy.net ]

Posted on February 24, 2017 by Editor

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Camille on Oscar

from The Hollywood Reporter

Camille Paglia on Oscar Glamour Then and Now: “Grandeur of Old Hollywood Is Gone” (Guest Column)

by Camille Paglia

Terry O’Neill/Getty Images; Peter Kramer/Bravo/NBCU Photo Bank/Getty Images

Faye Dunaway, shown after her Oscar win. (Inset: Paglia)

The social critic and author of the upcoming ‘Free Women, Free Men: Sex, Gender, Feminism,’ writes that Elizabeth Taylor’s 1961 win was “a huge cultural watershed, a prefiguration of the coming sexual revolution,” which predated a new generation of “hip, smart and cynical” stars.

As a child, I had two pagan high holy days every year. The first was Halloween, where I advertised my transgender soul by masquerading as a matador, a Roman soldier, Napoleon or Hamlet. The second was Oscar night, when Hollywood put its dazzling glamour on heady display for the whole world.

As I was growing up in the drearily conformist 1950s and early ’60s, it was hard to find information about popular culture, which wasn’t taken seriously. Deep-think European art films were drawing tiny coteries of intellectuals to small, seedy theaters, but flamboyant mainstream Hollywood was still dismissed as crass, commercial trash.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on February 23, 2017 by Editor

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Moby Yoga

from Educate Inspire Change

Moby Has Just Released Four Hours Worth Of Free Music Designed For Yoga And Meditation

Moby (Richard Melville Hall), is an American DJ, singer, songwriter, musician, photographer and animal rights activist. He is well known for his electronic music, veganism, and support of animal rights.

Recently on his website he released a series of ambient recording designed to help people feel a great calmness. This is what he said on his website ;

[ click to continue reading at EducateInspireChange.org ]

Posted on February 22, 2017 by Editor

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Andy’s Death Re-visited

from The New York Times

Andy Warhol’s Death: Not So Simple, After All

By BLAKE GOPNIK

Andy Warhol, in 1987. Credit: Associated Press 

“Pop Icon Andy Warhol Dies After Routine Surgery” ran the headline in The Houston Chronicle. Time magazine questioned how “the country’s most famous pop artist dies in a prestigious big-city hospital after a rather routine gallbladder operation.”

A routine surgery: Some version of that story was repeated around the world in the days and decades after the death of the 58-year-old artist, the 30th anniversary of which is on Wednesday.

Dr. John Ryan, a medical historian and retired surgeon, has recast the story line. “This was major, major surgery — not routine — in a very sick person,” Dr. Ryan, emeritus chief of surgery at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, said in a recent phone interview.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on February 21, 2017 by Editor

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RELATIONSHIP STATUS Gets Two More Seasons

from Variety

Milo Ventimiglia’s ‘Relationship Status’ Gets Two More Seasons on Verizon’s Go90 (EXCLUSIVE)

milo-ventimiglia-relationship-status-go90COURTESY OF STYLEHAUL

“Relationship Status,” the millennial social-media drama starring and executive produced by Milo Ventimiglia, is returning for two more seasons on Verizon’s Go90 mobile video service.

The show was created by Céline Geiger (“Vampire Diaries,” “The Lying Game”). It’s executive produced by Ventimiglia — who currently stars in NBC’s primetime hit drama “This Is Us” — and Russ Cundiff of DiVide Pictures; James Frey and Todd Cohen of Full Fathom Five; and StyleHaul.

Go90 has picked up two 12-episode seasons of “Relationship Status,” which will feature a traditional film and TV talent alongside digital creators. Season 2 is slated to hit the free, ad-supported service in the fall of 2017; the producers expect to announce cast details soon. As with the first run of the show, the ensemble dramedy will weave through the complexities of relationships while exploring the intertwining lives and connections of dating in the digital age.

“We could not be happier to continue ‘Relationship Status’ into season two and three,” Ventimiglia said in a statement. “The landscape of online dating and social media is ever-changing and we are looking forward to bringing more compelling stories about love, life and loss to Go90.”

[ click to continue reading at Variety ]

Posted on February 14, 2017 by Editor

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Little Shaq to SPROUT

from Deadline

Sprout Greenlights New Series ‘Remy And Boo’; Renews ‘Floogals’ & ‘Nina’s World’; Sets Development Slate

by 

Sprout, NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment’s 24-hour preschool network, is expanding its original programming slate with the greenlight of new series Remy and Boo created by Industrial Brothers’ Matt Fernandes and produced by Industrial Brothers and Boat Rocker Studios. The network also has given Season 2 renewals to its popular original series Floogals and Nina’s World and set several new projects in development, including an original series executive produced by Shaquille O’Neal.

Among the new projects on Sprout’s development slate are Little Shaq, executive produced by Shaquille O’Neal. Inspired by the former NBA superstar’s real life childhood, the series follows an outsized boy’s funny and often awkward adventures in his urban American neighborhood. From Universal Cable Productions, the series is also executive produced by Full Fathom Five’s James Frey and Todd Cohen.

[ click to read complete article at Deadline.com ]

Posted on February 11, 2017 by Editor

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Skankin’ Dogs

from BBC News

Dogs ‘prefer reggae and soft rock’ to other music genres, research suggests

Dogs appear to prefer reggae and soft rock over other genres of music, according to researchers.

The Scottish SPCA and the University of Glasgow have published a paper which suggests music affects dogs’ behaviour.

Researchers played a variety of music to dogs at a rehoming centre in Dumbarton and assessed physiological and behavioural changes.

Prof Neil Evans said the most positive behaviour changes were seen when the dogs were played reggae and soft rock.

All though these genres stood out, he said the study suggested each dog had its own music tastes.

Prof Evans said: “Overall, the response to different genres was mixed highlighting the possibility that like humans, our canine friends have their own individual music preferences.”

The dogs were played five different genres of music: soft rock, Motown, pop, reggae and classical.

The study suggested that dogs spent “significantly more time lying and significantly less time standing” when music was played, regardless of genre.

By measuring the dogs’ heart rate, researchers said they showed a decrease in stress levels when played music – particularly when it was soft rock or reggae.

[ click to continue reading at BBC ]

Posted on February 4, 2017 by Editor

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Poppies! Poppies!

from The San Francisco Chronicle

Winter rains could lead to spectacular floral display at California poppy reserve

By Amy Graff

The winter rains could trigger a poppy explosion in the California desert this spring.

The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve outside Lancaster has received the minimum amount of rain, 7 inches, to make a vibrant bloom possible. The weather over the next couple weeks will determine the future of the sprouts.

A late freeze, a heat wave or a three-week stretch without rain could wipe out the bloom.

“We need the rains to continue on a regular basis to maintain the bloom,” California State Park Interpreter Jean Rhyne says. “That’s really what they need. With the past years of drought, there isn’t a lot of moisture built up in the soil. If we’d had several years of good rain and enough moisture content in the soil, the plants would be growing early enough to carry them through a freeze or heat wave. The roots needs to be deep enough for them to tolerate extreme conditions.”

[ click to continue reading at SFGate ]

Posted on February 2, 2017 by Editor

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The Sampha Process

from The New York Times

Sampha, a Wounded Voice for Drake and Beyoncé, Steps Out With ‘Process’

By 

Sampha, the experimental British pop singer and electronic producer, sounds like someone who has seen things.

For years, some of the biggest names in music (and the best talent scouts) — including Drake, Beyoncé, Kanye West and Solange — have deployed his lush, tender soprano, which can feel wounded but never weak, to telegraph their vulnerability. Through guest appearances on tell-all songs like Drake’s “Too Much” and Mr. West’s “Saint Pablo,” Sampha has made himself a go-to collaborator for those in search of emotional heft.

So it’s peculiar, then, given his ability to touch souls with his voice, that Sampha (born Sampha Sisay) long shied away from singing. As a child, he was known at home mainly as a dancer, doing Michael Jackson moves at the urging of his four much older brothers. When a career in music dawned on him, he thought of becoming a producer like Pharrell or Timbaland.

“When I started, I was just making lots of beats, and I wasn’t even intending to sing over them,” Sampha said last month in a low murmur, trailing off more often than he finished sentences. “I didn’t even have a microphone at home — I would have to go to someone else’s house to record.”

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on February 1, 2017 by Editor

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The Great Gig In The Yoko

Posted on January 29, 2017 by Editor

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Old Venice

from KCET

The Lost Canals of Venice of America

by Nathan Masters

Secreted away from the hustle and bustle of the famous boardwalk, the picturesque canals of Venice, California, are one of the seaside community’s hidden charms. But in Venice’s early years, the canals that survive today were only a sideshow. The main attraction – the original canals of Abbot Kinney’s Venice of America – are lost to history, long ago filled in and now disguised as residential streets.

In planning Venice of America, Kinney incorporated several references to the community’s Mediterranean namesake, from the Italianate architecture to his fanciful notion of launching a cultural renaissance there. But Venice of America would not have lived up to its name were it not for its canals.

When it opened on July 4, 1905, Venice of America boasted seven distinct canals arranged in an irregular grid pattern, as seen below in Kinney’s master plan for the community. Totaling nearly two miles and dredged out of former saltwater marshlands, the canals encircled four islands, including the tiny triangular United States Island. The widest of them, appropriately named Grand Canal, terminated at a large saltwater lagoon. Three of the smaller canals referred to celestial bodies: Aldebaran, Venus, and Altair.

[ click to continue reading at KCET ]

Posted on January 28, 2017 by Editor

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Kuso Gross-o

from The Verge

Kuso is the grossest movie ever made

Grotesquely explicit descriptions ahead

by Chris Plante

There are a number of reasons I’m hesitant to recommend Kuso, the first film from artist and musician Steven Ellison, aka Flying Lotus. (Spoilers and grotesquely explicit descriptions ahead.) I’ll start with the footage of an erect penis being stabbed. As with most footage of an erect penis being violently gored by a long steel rod, it’s certainly unexpected. So by the time you cover your eyes, it’s already too late. And if you happened to blink, it’s cool, Kusodelivers a callback.

To paraphrase the official plot synopsis, Kuso is a collection of semi-connected short films chronicling the lives of the mutated women, men, and children of Los Angeles, following the earthquake to end all earthquakes. But that’s not really Kuso’s story, let alone its point. While the film does hint at some interesting (though opaque) commentary about Los Angeles, racism, and the grim and bloody history of America, its creators are mostly interested in one thing: producing the grossest film ever.

They succeed. The sliced eyeball in Un Chien Andalou, the copious shit in River of Fundament, the corporeal mutilation of the entire torture-porn genre: it’s all an amuse-bouchefor the final course that is Kuso.

[ click to continue reading at The Verge ]

Posted on January 26, 2017 by Editor

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Arrivederci Yellow Spaghetti

from TimeOut LA

Say goodbye to LACMA’s beloved yellow spaghetti installation

By Michael Juliano

While droves of visitors are busy posing in between the lamp posts of “Urban Light” or pretending to hold up the 340-ton “Levitated Mass” for a fun photo, LACMA regulars know that the Miracle Mile museum’s most fun photogenic installation is a hands-on piece from 1990 that resides next to the entrance of the Ahmanson Building. But it turns out those swinging spaghetti strands won’t be around for much longer.

Jesús Rafael Soto’s “Penetrable,” a thick curtain of yellow plastic hoses, will wrap up its stay at LACMA on February 12. The kinetic installation has invited visitors to get lost in its tangle of human-scale strands since 2011. We had grown so accustomed to the late Venezuelan artist’s sculpture that we assumed LACMA owned the piece, but it was instead part of a long-term loan from the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros, to which it’ll return next month.

[ click to continue reading at TimeOut ]

Posted on January 24, 2017 by Editor

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Speed Queens

from Dangerous Minds

SPEED QUEENS: THE FEARLESS FEMALE DRAG RACERS OF THE 60S AND 70S

By Cherrybomb

Shirley “Cha Cha” Muldowney on the cover of ‘Sunday News Magazine’ in 1978. 

Like many fields of work, the drag racing scene was and is fairly well dominated by men. During its heyday, specifically the mid-1960s through the early 1970s, the National Hot Rod Association incorporated the use of gorgeous women/models to help appeal to the fanboys. If you were into that scene, you probably spent a lot of time fantasizing about Pam Hardy aka “Jungle Pam” who accompanied driver “Jungle Jim” Liberman across the country clad in go-go boots and form-fitting, barely-there outfits that showcased her bodacious “assets” while she showboated on the track and in the pit for her adoring fans. Though Liberman would pass away unexpectedly in 1977, Hardy would continue to appear at racing events. But this post isn’t about buxom blonde race track cheerleaders. It’s about the ballsy women who drove the cars during that era—and there were actually quite a lot of “speed queens” that not only gave their male counterparts a run for their money, but also blazed a trail for other women who wanted smoke up the track.

And since I know you’re curious, here’s a shot of “Jungle Pam.” Though her attire says otherwise, it must have been cold that day.

[ click to continue reading (and viewing) at Dangerous Minds ]

Posted on January 23, 2017 by Editor

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ENDGAME: Rules of The Game

Posted on January 19, 2017 by Editor

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Superfly Snuka Gone

Posted on January 16, 2017 by Editor

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Low

from The Observer

How David Bowie Perfected the Concept Album on ‘Low’

David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to Earth.David Bowie in The Man Who Fell to EarthYouTube

It’s been said the beginning of Kosmische Musik—the hypnotic, minimalist style of music crudely dubbed “Krautrock” by the British press in the late ’60s—lies in the wake of World War II. The trance-like atmosphere and sterilized rhythms were the result of a sound designed to mirror the shell shock that fell over Germany after the demise of the Third Reich as well as the Schlager pop music deemed appropriate for public consumption by the government.

“There were not too many ways for a German rock musician to perform music, to make music, even to think of the theoretical development of music because there was no heritage in the country,” explains the late Edgar Froese of the groundbreaking electronic outfit Tangerine Dream in the BBC documentary Krautrock: The Rebirth of Germany.

“And the Germans were in a very bad situation. You couldn’t forget that. I mean, they were so stupid and guilty for it, to start two wars. As horrific as it was it had one, forgive me to say that, one positive point. There was nothing else to lose. They lost everything. And so, when we thought about doing music in a different form, there was only the free form, the abstract form.”

Oddly enough, when David Bowie began exploring this new music coming out of Germany from groups like Tangerine Dream and Cluster and Kraftwerk, he was coming under fire for some of the things he was saying while under his Thin White Duke persona in 1976.

[ click to continue reading at The Observer ]

Posted on January 15, 2017 by Editor

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William Peter Blatty Gone

from The Sun

William Peter Blatty dead aged 89 as tributes pour in for The Exorcist author

BY JOHN SHAMMAS
Linda Blair in 1973 playing the possessed child

THE legendary horror writer who penned The Exorcist has passed away at the age of 89.

William Peter Blatty’s death was confirmed on social media by the film’s director William Friedkin this afternoon.

The writer won the Oscar in 1973 for his screenplay, based on his own book that was published in 1971 which told the story of a child possessed by a demon.

And thanks to the film’s success, the possessed child’s image has become iconic among horror fans.

[ click to continue reading at The Sun ]

Posted on January 13, 2017 by Editor

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