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Charles Manson Finally Gone

from The New York Post

Charles Manson is rotting in hell

By Jamie Schram

Charles Manson, the ’60s cult leader behind one of the most notorious killings in American history, died Sunday in California after a prolonged illness, officials said. He was 83.

Manson – housed at Corcoran State Prison since 1989 – died at 8:13 p.m. local time at Kern County Hospital, the California Department of Corrections said in a press release early Monday.

He’d been in failing health for months and was first hospitalized back in January, reportedly with serious gastrointestinal problems.

Manson — who infamously wore a swastika tattoo between his eyebrows — had spent more than 45 years in prison after being convicted of directing his “Manson Family” clan of troubled, mostly female, followers to kill seven people in California in the summer of 1969. The dead included actress Sharon Tate, the pregnant wife of director Roman Polanski, who was stabbed 16 times.

“I am crime,” Manson proudly proclaimed during a collect call to The Post from prison in the mid-2000s.

Born on Nov. 12, 1934, in Cincinnati, Ohio, to a prostitute named Kathleen Maddox, Manson was officially dubbed “no name Maddox” at birth and apparently never knew his biological father.

[ click to continue reading at NYP ]

Posted on November 21, 2017 by Editor

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Malcolm Young Gone

from The New Yorker

Farewell to Malcolm Young, the Mastermind of AC/DC

By Jon Michaud

Picture yourself, if you will, at an AC/DC show at some unruly venue in Albany or Toledo in the fall of 1978. Perhaps a friend has brought you, or maybe hearing one of the band’s songs on FM radio has drawn you there. Regardless, you’re in luck. You’re catching AC/DC at the perfect moment, as it’s on the cusp of transforming itself into a musical juggernaut. The group, hailing from Australia, has just released “Powerage,” a forty-minute distillation of swinging, aggressive rock and roll that Keith Richards will later say is his favorite AC/DC album. In a matter of months, the band will record “Highway to Hell” and, soon after that, “Back in Black,” which will become the sixth-best-selling album of all time.

So, what do you notice? Up front and hard to miss is Angus Young, the diminutive dynamo of a lead guitarist, wearing the sweat-soaked remains of a velvet schoolboy uniform, duck-walking and thrashing his head like the lightning-strike victim on the cover of “Powerage.” Nearby, prancing bare-chested, is the lewd and mischievous lead singer, Bon Scott. (He’ll be dead by the end of the decade.) But, if you can take your eyes off these two showmen for a moment, you might find your gaze drifting to the left of the drum riser, where a pugnacious long-haired kid (he looks like he’s still in high school), wearing jeans and a white T-shirt, is strumming his Gretsch guitar and shaking his leg in time to the driving beat. His name is Malcolm Young, and you could be forgiven for seeing him as just another part of the backing band, but he is in fact the mastermind of the whole operation, at once its visionary and its taskmaster. He is the soul of the band, its leader on and off the stage.

[ click to continue reading at The New Yorker ]

Posted on November 19, 2017 by Editor

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Adoption Revisited

from The New York Times

Let’s Restart the Adoption Movement

by 

Jovanna Tosello

Giving to charity makes you happier, healthier and even richer.

That’s what I found in my research for a book I was writing back in 2003. Data clearly showed that giving and volunteering have a positive impact on givers’ health, wealth and life satisfaction — especially when we can see the faces of the people we are helping. Was this the secret to building a better life and happier world?

Excited by these findings, I discussed them with my wife, Ester. Always practical, she suggested that we put my research to the test in our own lives. “I just read that there are millions of abandoned little girls in China,” she said. “I think we should adopt one of them.”

My immediate response: “Hey, it’s only a book!”

Many people are anxious about adoption, although the source of those anxieties has changed over the decades. In a study in the 1980s, the sociologist Charlene E. Miall surveyed a large group of childless women. Many of the interviewees reported a widespread perception that the lack of biological ties must hurt the parent-child bond. They feared that society saw adopted children as second-rate, and adoptive parents as not “real” parents.

But today the most common concerns about adoption have shifted from cultural worries to financial and logistical ones. According to the National Foster Care Adoption Attitudes Survey, by 2013 the top two of eight potential concerns for those considering adoption were coping with paperwork and expense.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on November 18, 2017 by Editor

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Last Leo Sold

from artnet

The Last Known Painting by Leonardo da Vinci Just Sold for $450.3 Million

The 500-year-old painting is, by far, the most expensive work ever sold at auction.

Eileen Kinsella

Leonardo da Vinci's Salvator Mundi. Courtesy of Christie's Images Ltd. 2017.Leonardo da Vinci’s Salvator Mundi. Courtesy of Christie’s Images Ltd. 2017.

After weeks of anticipation, it finally happened: Leonardo da Vinci‘s Salvator Mundi (circa 1500), billed as the last known painting by the Renaissance master in private hands, sold at Christie’s for $450.3 million. It is, by far, the most expensive work of art ever sold at auction. In fact, the price is more than double the next most expensive work ever sold, Picasso’s Les femmes d’Alger (Version ‘O’), which fetched $179.4 million in 2015.

The work went to an anonymous client of Alex Rotter, Christie’s global co-head of contemporary art. Before a packed salesroom and scores of camera phones held aloft, bidding opened at $70 million. At $190 million, five bidders—four on the phones and one in the room—were still chasing the painting.

The 19-minute contest eventually came down to Rotter and Francois De Poortere, the head of Christie’s Old Master painting department in New York.

At $352 million, auctioneer Jussi Pylkkanen produced a glass of ice water from behind the rostrum and took a sip.

After a protracted bidding war in which Rotter’s client continued to bid in increments as large as $30 million—and De Poortere’s client bid in smaller steps of around $2–5 million—the work hammered down for $400 million to a flurry of applause (and a few gasps). With the auction house’s fees, the final price was $450.3 million.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on November 15, 2017 by Editor

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Chuck Mosley Gone

from SPIN

Faith No More’s Chuck Mosley Dead at 57

by Rob Arcand

Former Faith No More frontman Chuck Mosley has died. After years of sobriety, Mosley passed away on Friday November 9 “due to the disease of addiction,” according to a statement from his family. “He is survived by long-term partner Pip Logan, two daughters, Erica and Sophie and his grandson Wolfgang Logan Mosley,” the note continues. “The family will be accepting donations for funeral expenses.”

Mosley rose to prominence in the dynamic punk scene of Los Angeles in the early 80s, where he first joined the band Animated with future Faith No More bassist Billy Gould. After joining Faith No More in 1983, Mosley sang on their first two albums, 1985’s We Care A Lot and 1987’s Introduce Yourself, both of which helped establish the band as a powerhouse in funk and metal circles.

Mosley was fired from Faith No More in 1988, going on to sue the band, claiming a partnership stake, which they settled out of court. Later spending years fronting hardcore legends Bad Brains, Mosley also formed the band Cement later in the 90s. With an unpredictable energy, he continued releasing solo albums into the new millennium, eventually reuniting with Faith No More for two shows in 2016, following a reissue of the 1985 classic We Care A Lot.

[ click to continue reading at SPIN ]

Posted on November 11, 2017 by Editor

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Skinflick

Posted on November 10, 2017 by Editor

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Digitus Impudicus

from VICE

The Long, Angry History of Flipping the Bird

by Mack Lamoureux

The middle finger is way older than you think.

In late October, a woman named Juli Briskman pulled off something that many Americans—plus many foreigners—would die to do.

Briskman, bless her heart, flipped Trump the bird.

While Trump’s motorcade was cruising through Sterling, Virginia, they passed Briskman who was on her bike. Briskman, realizing who was pulling past her, extended her arm and popped up that wonderful, old as time, middle finger salute to America’s special liddle guy. As a result of pulling of the much loved stunt, the 50-year-old Briskman was fired by her government contractor employer.

However, the hero of this tale is a defiant one and told Huffpo that she’d “do it again” if given the chance.

But what was Briskman really saying with that single digit salute?

Well, as I’m sure you know, the finger is one of the most cherished gestures in the Western world. It’s how we show disapproval to those who can’t hear our vulgarities for whatever reason, it’s how I tell that chachi dude in the black truck that he almost ran me down in a crosswalk, and, if you’re the Canadian editor of VICE Sports, how you say hello to me in the morning.

The history of the finger isn’t completely concrete, but, as Benjamin Bergen, director of the Language and Cognition Lab at the University of California in San Diego explains, we know flipping people off goes back not just centuries but millennia.

“We know that it goes back, at least, to Greek times,” Bergen told VICE. “It shows up in some Greek plays and where it’s juxtaposed with other sorts of vulgar gestures, like the waggling of a penis for example. We also know that from records that it also showed up in plays in Roman times and in accounts of senate chamber conflict and so on.”

“We know that it had a name in Roman times where it was called the indecent or impudent finger, the Digitus Impudicus. It continues for the following millennium as we know, there are some urban myths people tell about the origins but as far as we can tell none of them are true, it really has a several thousand year history.”

[ click to continue reading at VICE ]

Posted on November 9, 2017 by Editor

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Bring Back The Hiss!

from The Wall Street Journal

A Global Shortage of Magnetic Tape Leaves Cassette Fans Reeling

Brisk demand from old and new fans prompts a Missouri company to return to a long-paused business

By Ryan Dezember and Anne Steele

SPRINGFIELD, Mo.—Steve Stepp and his team of septuagenarian engineers are using a bag of rust, a kitchen mixer larger than a man and a 62-foot-long contraption that used to make magnetic strips for credit cards to avert a disaster that no one saw coming in the digital-music era.

The world is running out of cassette tape.

[ click to continue reading at WSJ ]

Posted on November 6, 2017 by Editor

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Koons On Art

from Bloomberg

Jeff Koons on the True Price of Being an Artist

The creator of some of the world’s most expensive art talks about his collaboration with Louis Vuitton and how excitement affects value.

By James Tarmy

Jay-Z performs at the V Festival in front of a Jeff Koons balloon dog sculpture in August 2017. / PHOTOGRAPHER: SAM NEILL

James Tarmy: Your recent collaboration with Louis Vuitton is going gangbusters.

Jeff Koons: When the opportunity to work with Louis Vuitton came about, I thought, This is the perfect company: It has tremendous resources, it understands aesthetics, and it’s used to communicating to people through materialism.

As in, people who buy purses are materialistic?
When I say that, I mean through materials—being able to adjust the textures of leather or to enhance color and dyes through different coloring techniques.

Playing with surfaces has been a preoccupation in your art for years.
What art is, for me, is the possibility that when someone views something, they’re able to pick up on the essence of their own potential: It’s a vehicle—something that stimulates their own excitement.

In your mind, is there a creative difference between making a mass-market purse for Louis Vuitton and a $5 million sculpture?
It’s not like I collaborate with people where there’s differences, or tension, or the possibility of an outcome that’s different from what I intended. I try to choose collaborations where we both really believe in a commitment to the viewer—where you can both communicate that what you really care about is them.

[ click to continue reading at Bloomberg ]

Posted on November 5, 2017 by Editor

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Richard Hambleton Gone

from The New York Times

Richard Hambleton, ‘Shadowman’
of the ’80s Art Scene, Dies at 65

His spectral silhouettes appeared mysteriously on buildings in Manhattan — “I painted the town black,” he said — but his work also drew notice abroad.

By RICHARD SANDOMIR

In the early 1980s, when graffiti seemed to be everywhere, hundreds of startling black-painted silhouettes appeared mysteriously on buildings on the Lower East Side and in other parts of Manhattan. The spectral, life-size, menacing figures lurked and skulked and leapt. Some of their heads, with paint splattered upward, seemed to be exploding.

Richard Hambleton, the Canadian-born conceptual artist who painted them all (sometimes after fleeing the police, paint bucket in hand), was known as “the Shadowman.”

“I painted the town black,” Mr. Hambleton told People magazine in 1984. “They could represent watchmen or danger or the shadows of a human body after a nuclear holocaust or even my own shadow.”

He became part of the downtown art scene with his contemporaries Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat at Club 57, a basement bar on St. Marks Place in the East Village that is the subject of a new exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art, complete with one of Mr. Hambleton’s “Shadowman” works.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on November 3, 2017 by Editor

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Free Dead

from dead.net

30 DAYS OF DEAD

Official 2016 30 Days of Dead Cover Art

If you’ve been part of the Dead.net community for the past few years, then you know we’re on a mission to make a miracle every day in the month of November. This year is no different.

As a token of our appreciation for making 2017 an epic year, we’re giving away a high-quality 320Kbps MP3 download every day this month. That’s 30 days of unreleased Grateful Dead tracks from the vault, selected by Dead archivist and producer David Lemieux! Intrigued? We’re also going to put your knowledge to the test and give you a chance daily to win a limited-edition 7″ single, the 1st release from our 2017 series.

Here’s how it works:

You know your Ables from your Bakers from your C’s, but can your finely tuned ears differentiate the cosmic “comeback” tour from a spacey 70’s show? Each day we’ll post a free download from one of the Dead’s coveted shows. Will it be from that magical night at Madison Square Garden in ’93 or from way back when they were just starting to warm it up at Winterland? Is that Pigpen’s harmonica we hear? Brent on keys? Step right up and try your hand all November long.

Guess the venue and date correctly and you’ll be automatically entered to win the prize of the day. Each day a winner will be selected at random, so take your time and make your best guess! Answer correctly, and you will also be automatically entered for our Grand Prize – a copy of our SOLD OUT MAY 1977: GET SHOWN THE LIGHT boxed set.

[ click to download at dead.net ]

Posted on November 1, 2017 by Editor

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Minchin

Posted on October 31, 2017 by Editor

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Taylor-Johnson’s Take On “A Million Little Pieces”

from The Hollywood Reporter

Sam Taylor-Johnson and Aaron Taylor-Johnson to Tackle ‘A Million Little Pieces’ (Exclusive)

by Borys Kit , Tatiana Siegel

Mike Pont/WireImage/Sam Taylor-Johnson, Aaron Taylor-Johnson

CAA has been negotiating the release of the rights of James Frey’s 2003 book from Warners, and the package is expected to be launched at the upcoming American Film Market.

The big-screen adaptation of James Frey’s best-seller A Million Little Pieces is being reassembled, this time as a team-up between husband-and-wife duo Aaron Johnson and Sam Taylor-Johnson.

The 2003 book was once one of the hottest properties in town but became radioactive after Frey was exposed for inventing or embellishing parts of the story that was originally dubbed a memoir. Warner Bros. won the book in a bidding war in 2003 and set it up with producer Brad Pitt and his then-Plan B partners Jennifer Aniston and Brad Grey. Frey wrote the first version of the screenplay.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on October 24, 2017 by Editor

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Cristóbal Vila

Posted on October 21, 2017 by Editor

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‘It’s a Very F*cked Up Time to Be’

from Daily Beast

Michael Stipe Opens Up About R.E.M. and President Trump: ‘It’s a Very F*cked Up Time to Be’

The R.E.M. frontman sat down with Stereo Williams to discuss the 25th anniversary of their celebrated album ‘Automatic for the People’ and the not so shiny happy state of America.

There are certain things Michael Stipe recalls about his most visible years as a rock superstar that give a clear indicator of his paradoxical relationship with icon status. He’s alternately cocky about R.E.M.’s heyday (“we were fucking audacious”) and self-effacingly dismissive about their most celebrated ’90s album (“I feel like I’ve been repeating everything I’ve been saying for the last quarter century”). The band’s Automatic for the People, released 25 years ago in October 1992, was a creative triumph at the height of R.E.M.’s most commercial period. The quartet from Athens, Georgia, had famously risen through the ranks of ’80s college rock to become ’90s pop stars, and frontman Stipe was wrestling with newfound superstardom.

And on a balmy day in the East Village, he’s still wrestling with that fame in hindsight.

“I became extremely famous—suddenly,” Stipe recalls. He smirks when thinking back to when he’d suddenly gone from college rock enigma to Bono-level rock star.

“I used to be able to identify the people that would recognize me walking on the sidewalk in New York,” he muses. “That went from those identifiable music fans or punk rock fans or whatever—to everyone. I went from a singer in a band with a few hits and a core audience—a large core audience—but [after] ‘Losing my Religion’ and the popularity of that video… I was hugely famous and that was weird for me. I’m still and always will be shy. I’ve learned how to deal with it and finish my sentences and talk to people in a regular way, but it was intense.”

[ click to continue reading at Daily Beast ]

Posted on October 15, 2017 by Editor

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Hatchet Throwing, Cool

from AFP via Yahoo!
<h1″>Hatchet throwing a new pastime in America

by Thomas URBAIN

Eatontown (United States) (AFP) – What better, safer way to have fun than drink beer and throw a hatchet?

This is now a thing in America, a new pastime, and it’s spreading.

On a busy Friday night at Stumpy’s Hatchet House in New Jersey, it sounds like this: the thud of the blade sticking into a wooden target, people cheering a good toss, and a bell ringing out when somebody scores a bull’s eye.

Its four founders say this place, which opened 18 months ago, is the first of its kind in the US, although Canada is generally considered the cradle of competitive hatchet-hurling.

Such spots are now found in Chicago, Washington, Nashville and Denver, among other US cities.

Stumpy’s owners are talking about opening another elsewhere in New Jersey and have even started offering franchise arrangements. They hope to have a network of 15 within a year.

“This is the next bowling,” said Kelly Josberger, a former elementary school principal aged 51 who decided to change careers. Like her three partners, she had never before run a business.

[ click to continue reading at Yahoo! ]

Posted on October 14, 2017 by Editor

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Filthy Re-birth

from The New York Times

Can Gowanus Survive Its Renaissance?

Brooklyn’s famously filthy canal is getting cleaned up. A building boom is coming. And not everyone is happy.

By ANDY NEWMAN

Stroller traffic on Carroll Street. Stephen Speranza for The New York Times

“Welcome to Venice Jerko.” The greeting is painted in three-foot-high letters on a brick wall along Brooklyn’s legendarily polluted Gowanus Canal, right across from the canal’s first luxury high-rise and its new waterfront promenade.

One recent sunny Sunday, a party of German seminary students and a pair of hotel publicists gathered for a canoe tour. The seminarians had read about the canal in a German travel guide that promised “a romantic sunset on the water.” The publicists were scouting to see if the boutique hotel, opening a few blocks away, might want to include guided canoe trips.

But as much as the canal zone has been remade already, the next few years promise, or threaten, a different magnitude of change altogether.

[ click to continue reading at NYT ]

Posted on October 13, 2017 by Editor

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Charlie’s Stash

from The Thread

HOW CHARLIE CHAPLIN’S WIFE SAVED HIS BACKYARD FORTUNE

By Sean Braswell

Charlie Chaplin was having lunch in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean when he heard some devastating news on September 19, 1952. The British screen legend and longtime U.S. resident received a telegram aboard the England-bound Queen Elizabeth indicating that he would not be allowed back in America unless he agreed to come before an immigration authority to answer charges of political and moral turpitude. Translation: U.S. authorities thought he was both a communist and an adulterer, which put him into rather a sticky situation in 1950s America.

Chaplin was returning by ship to his native England for the first time in more than 20 years, bringing with him his wife and four children for the worldwide premiere of his latest film. Like many in Hollywood, he had been growing increasingly frustrated with being the target of communist allegations hurled by Sen. Joseph McCarthy and others in Washington. And so Chaplin made a bold decision after receiving the telegram: He would not go back to the U.S. The hitch? Chaplin’s vast Hollywood empire, a fortune amassed over decades of successful motion pictures, lay in his adopted homeland. More than a million dollars also lay buried in his Beverly Hills backyard. How was he to extricate his fortune without returning? To solve his problem, Chaplin turned to the person he trusted more than any other — his fourth wife, and an American citizen — Oona O’Neill Chaplin.

[ click to continue reading at The Thread ]

Posted on October 11, 2017 by Editor

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Virgin Mars

from Business Insider

Richard Branson says he’s 6 months from going to space — but Mars belongs to Elon Musk

by Tom Turula

richard bransonRichard Branson’s private space program Virgin Galactic has long promised to democratize space travel.

After thirteen years of development and setbacks — including a fatal crash, technical difficulties and frequent delays — Richard Branson’s private space program, Virgin Galactic, is soon ready for live action, at least according to Branson himself.

“We are hopefully about three months before we are in space, maybe six months before I’m in space,” the founder of Virgin Galactic, which is part of Virgin Group, told an audience at Nordic Business Forum in Helsinki, Finland last week.

When he received an audience question about who will reach Mars first, he or Elon Musk, Branson made clear he is not as keen on the red star as SpaceX and Tesla’s founder.

“I’m not as passionate about Mars as Elon is. My love for space is about how much it can do for people back here on earth, and that’s what Virgin Galactic is pushing towards.”

[ click to continue reading at Business Insider ]

Posted on October 9, 2017 by Editor

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Kubrick’s Right-hand

from Daily. Beast

Stanley Kubrick’s Right-Hand Man Speaks: The Personal Toll of Working With a Genius

Leon Vitali’s career spent working alongside Stanley Kubrick is a case study of both selfless devotion and self-destructive mania. He wouldn’t have it any other way.

by

Every serious cinephile is aware of Stanley Kubrick, but far fewer are familiar with Leon Vitali, the English co-star of Kubrick’s Barry Lyndon who, following that performance, became the auteur’s steadfast right-hand man. Doing everything asked of him by the legendarily meticulous filmmaker—from taking notes, creating marketing materials, and color-coding prints, to casting, rehearsing with stars, and acting himself—Vitali was the irreplaceable assistant who helped shepherd to the screen The Shining, Full Metal Jacketand Eyes Wide Shut, even as his vital role in those projects remained largely hidden from the public.

That situation is justly rectified by Tony Zierra’s Filmworker, a superb documentary about Vitali’s career alongside Kubrick that serves as a case study of both selfless devotion and self-destructive mania—as well as a much-deserved celebration of a true artist-behind-the-artist. And according to its subject, it certainly doesn’t overstate how uniquely demanding it was to work with one of cinema’s true geniuses.

“Balance is a word that rarely came into my vocabulary throughout my whole time, whether I was working with Stanley or not,” Vitali chuckles when speaking to me from Los Angeles, two days before Filmworker’s premiere (this Tuesday) at the New York Film Festival. “I’m just one of those people who gets quite emotional once they got locked into something. And some things take on proportions of life and death.” Though he found watching himself on screen in this form “a little bit weird,” he confesses, “I can honestly say it didn’t exaggerate, in any stretch of the imagination, how fraught or tense it could be. Or how time intensive.”

[ click to continue reading at Daily Beast ]

Posted on October 8, 2017 by Editor

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Red-Right 88

from BobFreyMusic.com

BOB FREY

Hey Everybody,

Below is a newly recorded version of my 20-minute (!!) ode to the Cleveland Browns “Red-Right 88”.  It first appeared on my record “Tape From Minnesota” (2004).  I decided to re-record this song, started from scratch and, in addition to new vocals and guitar, I have added, with a little help from my friends, some tasty keys & percussion.  This is a work-in-progress, and I hope to have some violin on there soon.  But, as another Browns season begins, I thought I’d get this version out there.  Enjoy! Hope everybody doing well and, Go Browns!! B
P.S. And- Good Luck to our baseball boys as they chase their record-setting 22nd win in a row!  Jonathan and I have watched just about every game from our comfy Mpls basement.  Cherished Father & Son times… kinda like those described in “Red Right 88”, except Cleveland is winning! B

[ click to check out Bob Frey Music ]

Posted on October 7, 2017 by Editor

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Luca Stricagnoli

Posted on October 6, 2017 by Editor

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AIM Gone

from The Atlantic

AIM Was Perfect, and Now It Will Die

A eulogy for the chatting service, which will shut down on December 15

by ROBINSON MEYER

The logo for AOL Instant Messenger, a yellow running personAxel Heimken / AP

You kids don’t understand. You could never understand.

You walk around in habitats of text, pop-up cathedrals of social language whose cornerstone is the rectangle in your pocket. The words and the alert sounds swirl around you and you know how to read them and hear them because our culture—that we made—taught you how. We were the first generation to spend two hours typing at our closest friends instead of finishing our homework, parsing and analyzing and worrying over “u were so funny in class today” or “nah lol youre pretty cool.”

That thing you know how to do, that cerebellum-wracking attentiveness to every character of the text message and what it might mean—we invented that. But when we invented it, we didn’t have text messages, we didn’t have Snapchat, we didn’t have group chats or Instagram DMs or school-provided Gmail accounts. We had AIM. We had AOL Instant Messenger.

“How did AIM work?” you ask. It was like Gchat or iMessage, but you could only do it from a desktop computer. (Since we didn’t have smartphones back then, its desktop-delimited-ness was self-explanatory.) You could set lengthy status messages with animated icons in them. And iconic alert noises played at certain actions: the door-opening squeak when someone logged on, the door-closing clickwhen they logged off, the boodleoop for every new message.

[ click to continue reading at The Atlantic ]

Posted on October 5, 2017 by Editor

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The Hooker Ripping It Up In Detroit

Posted on October 4, 2017 by Editor

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Kim Gets Screwed Again

from GIZMODO

Supreme Court Declines to Hear Kim Dotcom’s Civil Asset Forfeiture Appeal

by Tom McKay

Former Megaupload chief Kim Dotcom’s long, wild ride through the courts crashed into another setback Monday, with the Supreme Court declining to hear an appeal in the 2012 seizure of his assets in New Zealand.

US prosecutors had charged Dotcom with crimes including racketeering and money laundering related to Megaupload, the file-hosting service they said he operated as a thinly veiled piracy site. In January 2012, New Zealand authorities armed with rifles and tactical gear and accompanied by police helicopters raided his rented mansion at the behest of the US, seizing millions of dollars in property and freezing Dotcom’s overseas bank accounts.

The US government has been trying to get its hands on $40 million of those assets since 2014, saying Dotcom’s web empire profited by $175 million at the cost of some $500 million in stolen intellectual property from the entertainment industry. In 2016, an appeals court ruled the civil forfeiture could move forward because Dotcom never came to the US to contest it—thus making himself subject to “fugitive disentitlement.” That more or less means US courts consider him to have become a fugitive and thus unable to contest the seizures.

[ click to continue reading at GIZMODO ]

Posted on October 3, 2017 by Editor

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Paglia on Hefner

from The Hollywood Reporter

Camille Paglia on Hugh Hefner’s Legacy, Trump’s Masculinity and Feminism’s Sex Phobia

by Jeanie Pyun

With the death of Playboy founder Hugh Hefner on Sept. 27, cultural historian and contrarian feminist Camille Paglia spoke to The Hollywood Reporter in an exclusive interview on topics ranging from what Hef’s choice of the bunny costume revealed about him to the current “dreary” state of relationships between the sexes.

Have you ever been to a party at the Playboy Mansion?

No, I’m not a partygoer! (Laughs.)

So let me just ask: Was Hugh Hefner a misogynist?

Absolutely not! The central theme of my wing of pro-sex feminism is that all celebrations of the sexual human body are positive. Second-wave feminism went off the rails when it was totally unable to deal with erotic imagery, which has been a central feature of the entire history of Western art ever since Greek nudes.

So let’s dig in a little — what would you say was Playboy’s cultural impact?

Hugh Hefner absolutely revolutionized the persona of the American male. In the post-World War II era, men’s magazines were about hunting and fishing or the military, or they were like Esquire, erotic magazines with a kind of European flair.

Hefner reimagined the American male as a connoisseur in the continental manner, a man who enjoyed all the fine pleasures of life, including sex. Hefner brilliantly put sex into a continuum of appreciative response to jazz, to art, to ideas, to fine food. This was something brand new. Enjoying fine cuisine had always been considered unmanly in America. Hefner updated and revitalized the image of the British gentleman, a man of leisure who is deft at conversation — in which American men have never distinguished themselves — and the art of seduction, which was a sport refined by the French.

Hefner’s new vision of American masculinity was part of his desperate revision of his own Puritan heritage. On his father’s side, he descended directly from William Bradford, who came over on the Mayflower and was governor of Plymouth Colony, the major settlement of New England Puritans.

But Hefner’s worldview was already dated by the explosion of the psychedelic 1960s. The anything-goes, free-love atmosphere — illustrated by all that hedonistic rolling around in the mud at Woodstock in 1969 — made the suave Hefner style seem old-fashioned and buttoned up. Nevertheless, I have always taken the position that the men’s magazines — from the glossiest and most sophisticated to the rawest and raunchiest — represent the brute reality of sexuality. Pornography is not a distortion. It is not a sexist twisting of the facts of life but a kind of peephole into the roiling, primitive animal energies that are at the heart of sexual attraction and desire.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on October 2, 2017 by Editor

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Sun & Peng’s ‘Dogs That Cannot Touch Each Other’

Posted on October 1, 2017 by Editor

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Monty Hall Gone

from DEADLINE

Monty Hall Dies; ‘Let’s Make A Deal’ Host Was 96

by Bruce Haring

TV game show host and creator Monty Hall, the man who took Let’s Make A Deal from a daytime staple into prime time, has died of heart failure in Beverly Hills. He was 96 and died at home. His daughter, Joanna Gleason, confirmed his death to the New York Times. 

The show premiered in 1963 and, with some interruptions, continues to run. Contestants in outrageous costumes try to guess prices and see “what’s behind Door No. 1,” a line that bled into the popular culture.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on September 30, 2017 by Editor

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Taco Bell Garb

from People

Taco Bell Is Launching a Clothing Line with Forever 21

RELATED: The Most Outrageous Taco Bell Menu Items of All Time

You’ll soon be able to wear your fast food pride on your sleeve—literally.

Taco Bell is teaming up with Forever 21 to launch a fashion line which they promise to be “hotter than Diablo Sauce.” We would be frauds (FRAUDS!) if we didn’t admit to kind of loving bargain clothing that displays a love of tacos.

The line, which comes out on October 11, includes a millennial pink pullover sweatshirt with the “Live Mas” logo embroidered on it and a tank top inspired by a fire sauce packet.

So far, the only items we’ve seen are those two pieces—modeled by Brittany Creech and Andrew McBurnie, super fans who you may remember bucked tradition and shot their senior portraits at Taco Bell.

[ click to continue reading at People ]

Posted on September 29, 2017 by Editor

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Baa Baa Land

Posted on September 27, 2017 by Editor

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Real Football

Posted on September 24, 2017 by Editor

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Grace

from Interview

FIVE MINUTES WITH THE LEGENDARY GRACE JONES

By Michael-Oliver Harding

In an early scene of the new documentary Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami, the ferocious songstress and boundary-smashing model—whose prior silver screen highlights include portraying an Eiffel Tower-scaling Bond henchwoman and a centuries-old vampire stripper—signs autographs for fans huddled behind a barricade. One of them asks if she’d ever act in another movie, to which she commandingly answers, “My own!” This sets in motion a globetrotting journey a full decade in the making, acquainting us with Jones’ loved ones while peeling away her enigmatic, larger-than-life persona.

Director Sophie Fiennes is with the avant-pop legend when she delivers powerhouse performances in a Dublin theatre, attends church with her mother and revisits her Pentecostal upbringing in Jamaica, sips Cristal in her hotel room in a fur coat and reconnects with her former co-conspirator (and father to her son) Jean-Paul Goude in Paris. Over the course of the film, the subversive 69-year-old performer—who reminds us men should be penetrated at least once “so they know what it’s like to receive”—reveals herself like she seldom has before. Judging by the outpouring of praise during a post-screening Q&A at the Toronto International Film Festival last week, audiences were relieved that the ageless diva—who once threw her baby shower at the legendary Paradise Garage dressed as a toy soldier—has lost none of her bite or risk-taking spirit.

When Interview meets her the following evening for an expeditious five-minute chat in the dining room of an opulent Yorkville hotel, Jones is feasting on a hearty meal of steak frites. “I have to eat and talk, darling, so I’m afraid you’ll hear my munching on your recorder.” And with that said, Jones proceeded, her wit unimpaired and her laughter as rip-roaring as ever.

[ click to continue reading at Interview ]

Posted on September 21, 2017 by Editor

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Schrader on The Extinction Of The Human Race

from VARIETY

Paul Schrader on the Extinction of the Human Race and His New Film ‘First Reformed’

By Brent Lang

It’s no surprise that Paul Schrader, a filmmaker associated with such dark classics as “Taxi Driver” and “American Gigolo,” has a pessimistic streak. But it’s still bracing to hear him argue that humanity, as we know it, is unlikely to last through the next century.

In an interview at the Toronto Film Festival, Schrader said he believes that global warming is accelerating at such a rate that there’s little that can be done to arrest the ecological changes. His Cassandra-like streak informs “First Reformed,” his new drama that’s been screening to strong reviews at the fall festivals. The film grapples with issues of faith while also sounding a warning about the destruction of the natural world. It follows Ethan Hawke as a small-town priest who toys with becoming a suicide bomber in the service of a radical form of environmentalism. Schrader spoke to Variety about religion in film, working with Hawke, and why he believes the world will be well rid of the human race.

[ click to continue reading at VARIETY ]

Posted on September 20, 2017 by Editor

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