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Trigonometry Revisited

from PHYS.ORG

Mathematical mystery of ancient Babylonian clay tablet solved

UNSW Sydney scientists have discovered the purpose of a famous 3700-year old Babylonian clay tablet, revealing it is the world’s oldest and most accurate trigonometric table, possibly used by ancient mathematical scribes to calculate how to construct palaces and temples and build canals.

The new research shows the Babylonians beat the Greeks to the invention of trigonometry – the study of triangles – by more than 1000 years, and reveals an ancient mathematical sophistication that had been hidden until now.

Known as Plimpton 322, the small tablet was discovered in the early 1900s in what is now southern Iraq by archaeologist, academic, diplomat and antiquities dealer Edgar Banks, the person on whom the fictional character Indiana Jones was based.

It has four columns and 15 rows of numbers written on it in the cuneiform script of the time using a base 60, or sexagesimal, system.

“Plimpton 322 has puzzled mathematicians for more than 70 years, since it was realised it contains a special pattern of numbers called Pythagorean triples,” says Dr Daniel Mansfield of the School of Mathematics and Statistics in the UNSW Faculty of Science.

“The huge mystery, until now, was its purpose – why the ancient scribes carried out the complex task of generating and sorting the numbers on the tablet.

“Our research reveals that Plimpton 322 describes the shapes of right-angle triangles using a novel kind of trigonometry based on ratios, not angles and circles. It is a fascinating mathematical work that demonstrates undoubted genius.

“The tablet not only contains the world’s oldest trigonometric table; it is also the only completely accurate trigonometric table, because of the very different Babylonian approach to arithmetic and geometry.

[ click to continue reading at PHYS.ORG ]

Posted on September 16, 2017 by Editor

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Jim Carrey Awesome

Posted on September 15, 2017 by Editor

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Don Ohlmeyer Gone

from DEADLINE

Don Ohlmeyer Dies: ‘Monday Night Football’ Producer, Former NBC West Coast President Was 72

by Dino-Ray Ramos

Don Ohlmeyer, former NBC West Coast president and the man who transformed Monday Night Football into a pop culture phenomenon, died today at age 72. Sportscaster Al Michaels announced the news during the telecast of the Giants-Cowboys game on NBC’s Sunday Night Football.

Ohlmeyer was born in New Orleans on February 3, 1945 and grew up in Chicago. He began his career with ABC Sports, working on Wide World Of Sports, and was the first producer of Monday Night Football. He also produced Olympics broadcasts.

In 1977, he went to NBC where he worked as the executive producer of the network’s sports division through 1982. He served as EP of NBC’s coverage of the Super Bowl and World Series and created many series including SportsWorld, Games People Play, and produced the made-for-television movie The Golden Moment: An Olympic Love Story. He expanded sports coverage, introduced innovative production techniques including a 1980 NFL telecast with no announcers.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on September 10, 2017 by Editor

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Pierre Bergé Gone

from Architectural Digest

Remembering Pierre Bergé

The multitalented creative died today at age 86

Pierre Bergé at his retreat in Normandy. / Photo: Pascal Chevalier

Pierre Bergé had no nickname that I know of, but the pugnacious industrialist—a cofounder and longtime pilot, professional and personal, of fashion god Yves Saint Laurent—could have been dubbed Il Magnifico.

Few people juggled so much so well (give or a take a few upsets) as Bergé, who died today, age 86, at his home in Provence. He was a magazine publisher and a restaurateur (I can’t resist his Caviar Prunier outlets). A dynamo since his adventuresome youth—when he was the lover and successful promoter of French artist Bernard Buffet before defecting to Saint Laurent in a coup-de-foudre passion—he founded museums, ran opera houses, chaired foundations, and agitated French politics as an unrepentant Socialist with about as much tact as a hand grenade. He was a literary lion, had his own publishing company, and launched an auction house. He was a pioneering force in AIDS research and treatment in France, and a major figure in combating racism and discrimination. In short, Bergé was a whirlwind, a magician, a man who built mountains as easily as he moved or demolished them.

[ click to continue reading at AD ]

Posted on September 8, 2017 by Editor

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Oral Marley

from the Los Angeles Post-Examiner

Safeguarding Bob Marley with “So Much Things to Say”

BY STEPHEN COOPER

In reviewing Roger Steffens’s latest book, So Much Things to Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley, Hua Hsu asserts in The New Yorker that Steffens’s contribution to the Marley canon is his “nerdish monomania.” But Steffens, who invited me to tour his overstuffed “Reggae Archives” in L.A., epitomizes cool – as does his magnum opus on Marley – right down to its subtle red, green, and gold binding. Moreover, it is Steffens’s avidity and accuracy that allow readers to “really know the man” as Steffens did when he toured with Marley, subsequently devoting his life to safeguarding his legacy. Jamaican poet laureate Linton Kwesi Johnson writes in his introduction to Steffens’s oeuvre, that Steffens shows “how serious Marley was about his art: his single-mindedness and his consummate professionalism.” Steffens’s book exudes those same qualities.

On July 29, 2017, Steffens blessed me with a return invitation to the Reggae Archives to interview him. The topics we discussed included what got him interested in reggae; how his passion for the music developed; The New Yorker’sreview of his new book; the book’s main dramas and themes; and finally, Steffens’s hopes for “So Much Things to Say”’s enduring legacy. What follows is a transcription of our discussion modified only slightly for clarity and space considerations.

[ click to continue reading at LA Post-Examiner ]

Posted on September 6, 2017 by Editor

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Help me, Obi X Kenobi. You’re my only hope.

from Vanity Fair

Why Generation X Might Be Our Last, Best Hope

Caught between vast, self-regarding waves of boomers and millennials, Generation X is steeped in irony, detachment, and a sense of dread. One of their rank argues that this attitude makes it the best suited to preserve American tradition in these dark new days.

by RICH COHEN

Collage of movie posters, album covers, photographs, books, and logos.Some of Generation X’s enduring cultural artifacts.

Demographics are destiny. We grew up in the world and mind of the baby-boomers simply because there were so many of them. They were the biggest, easiest, most free-spending market the planet had ever known. What they wanted filled the shelves and what fills the shelves is our history. They wanted to dance so we had rock ‘n’ roll. They wanted to open their minds so we had LSD. They did not want to go to war so that was it for the draft. We will grow old in the world and mind of the millennials because there are even more of them. Because they don’t know what they want, the culture will be scrambled and the screens a never-ending scroll. They are not literally the children of the baby-boomers but might as well be—because here you have two vast generations, linking arms over our heads, akin in the certainty that what they want they will have, and that what they have is right and good.

The members of the in-between generation have moved through life squeezed fore and aft, with these tremendous populations pressing on either side, demanding we grow up and move away, or grow old and die—get out, delete your account, kill yourself. But it’s become clear to me that if this nation has any chance of survival, of carrying its traditions deep into the 21st century, it will in no small part depend on members of my generation, Generation X, the last Americans schooled in the old manner, the last Americans that know how to fold a newspaper, take a joke, and listen to a dirty story without losing their minds.

[ click to continue reading at Vanity Fair ]

Posted on September 1, 2017 by Editor

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Hyatt’s Gone

from WHAM

40-year-old East Rochester video store to close its doors

by Carlet Cleare

East Rochester, N.Y. – One of the largest and last local video stores in this digital era is closing.

Walking into Hyatt’s Classic Video on West Commercial Street feels a bit nostalgic, with its extensive collection of VHS tapes, DVDs, cassette tapes and VCRs.

Technology has run through Bob Hyatt’s veins since the 1960s, when he started selling home theater equipment out of his house.

“When a lot of the chain stores like Norman Brothers and Century started selling components through catalogs,” Hyatt said, “we saw the handwriting on the wall and we went into video.”

The 85-year-old owned and operated the family video store in East Rochester for 40 years. His four children were also raised in the business.

“We moved into this building on the night of the Ice Storm in 1991,” he said.

Hyatt worked through the struggles of big box competitors and, now, streaming, keeping afloat through converting content on VHS tapes onto DVDs.

At one time, they had 35,000 titles. Now, the Hyatts are closing.

[ click to continue reading at WHAM ]

Posted on August 31, 2017 by Editor

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Lost Languages Found

from The Times of India

Scientists discover lost languages at Egyptian monastery

by Tom Whipple, Science Editor

The library at Saint Catherine’s monastery has been in continuous use for 1,500 yearsThe library at Saint Catherine’s monastery has been in continuous use for 1,500 years / KHALED ELFIQI

Ancient works not read by humans since the Dark Ages have been found at an Egyptian monastery, using a technique that allows researchers to reconstruct documents long ago scrubbed off parchment.

The finds at Saint Catherine’s monastery on the Sinai peninsula hailed a “new golden age of discovery”, according to the scientists behind the research, who believe that the methods could reveal many other lost texts.

They have been chronicling the monastery’s library, which has been in continuous use for 1,500 years, but which is today threatened by growing Islamic fundamentalism and attacks on Christians in the region.

Among the discoveries were three ancient Greek medical texts that were previously unknown to scholars, as well as the earliest copies of some from Hippocrates.

[ click to continue reading at The Times of India ]

Posted on August 28, 2017 by Editor

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Tobe Hooper Gone

from DEADLINE

‘Texas Chain Saw Massacre’ Director Tobe Hooper Dies At 74

by Mike Fleming Jr

Tobe Hooper, one of the pioneers of the horror genre, died Saturday at age 74. He passed in Sherman Oaks. Hooper made two of the most distinguished films in the fright genre. His low budget 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which gave a glimpse of the frightful potential of a power tool, and became a favorite on the drive in theater circuit. Made at a cost of $300,000, the film grossed over $30 million at the domestic box office. He also directed Poltergeist.

Tobe Hooper, one of the pioneers of the horror genre, died Saturday at age 74. He passed in Sherman Oaks. Hooper made two of the most distinguished films in the fright genre. His low budget 1974 film The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, which gave a glimpse of the frightful potential of a power tool, and became a favorite on the drive in theater circuit. Made at a cost of $300,000, the film grossed over $30 million at the domestic box office. He also directed Poltergeist.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on August 27, 2017 by Editor

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Aphex Technical Equipment Supply

from NPR

How A Small Town Record Store Quietly Released An Exclusive Aphex Twin Record

Working away from a cultural capital comes with significant upsides.

by SCOTT STERLING

Well beyond the obvious tropes of Motown, techno and hip-hop icons, evidence of metropolitan Detroit’s reputation as a music city could historically be found within the confines of its record stores. Legendary and sadly long-gone record shops in and around the city were often nearly as important and influential as the music sold in them.

Today, a new crop of budding independent record stores is taking the torch for new and innovative music in southeastern Michigan, none more interestingly than Technical Equipment Supply, which recently made its home in an unlikely place.

Ypsilanti, Mich., is a small Midwestern town of less than 23,000 residents, 36 miles from Detroit and situated just a few miles east of Ann Arbor. “Ypsi” still retains much of it’s mid-20th century charm, and has yet to get caught up in the waves of gentrification sweeping cities across America, primarily in what’s known — both positively and derisively, depending on who’s doing the talking — as “New” Detroit.

[ click to read full article at NPR ]

Posted on August 25, 2017 by Editor

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James Cameron – Disturbing

from The Village Voice

“Terminator 2: Judgment Day” Is Still a Deeply Upsetting Blockbuster

“It’s in your nature to destroy yourselves”

by BILGE EBIRI

Say what you will about James Cameron, but the man commits. Stories of the director’s perfectionism, his control-freak mania, and his sheer drive are legion, but I’m talking about something more fundamental to the work itself. Whereas most action filmmakers are content to let emotion and morality play second fiddle to the more immediate, commercial elements of their movies, Cameron refuses to relegate such things to the background. The love story in Titanic isn’t just an excuse to stage an extravagant disaster flick; it becomes the picture’s raison d’être (and, not coincidentally, a key factor in its success). The environmental and anti-colonial overtones of Avatar aren’t there merely to provide some character shading; they practically take over. And now, back in theaters and converted to 3-D, is Cameron’s classic sequel Terminator 2: Judgment Day — not just a movie about fighting to prevent nuclear apocalypse, but a movie obsessed with nuclear apocalypse.

Maybe that wasn’t so clear back in 1991, when it originally came out. The Iron Curtain had recently fallen, effectively ending the Cold War and seemingly lifting the nuclear threat. I distinctly remember Sarah Connor’s occasional ruminations on the fate of the human race eliciting chuckles in my theater at the time. Today, however, the overwhelming despair of T2 is impossible to ignore. This is one of the most upsetting blockbusters ever.

In 1984, Cameron’s original Terminator played a key role in turning Arnold Schwarzenegger into a massive global star, and it was a nasty, brutish little beast of a movie — an R-rated horror flick posing as a sci-fi thriller. But it worked (and became a hit) because, playing a killer super-robot sent from the future by our machine overlords to murder the young woman (Linda Hamilton) who would give birth to the leader of the human resistance, Schwarzenegger used his considerable limitations as an actor to his advantage. Thus did Arnold become an icon of Reaganite, muscles-and-guns spectacle: a terse, emotionless robot racking up an insane body count with an assortment of heavy weaponry.

[ click to continue reading at The Village Voice ]

Posted on August 24, 2017 by Editor

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Reggae Healing

from The Saudi Gazette

Reggae helps heal mental wounds of torture for migrants in Italy

Ibrahim Jalloh of Sierra Leone sings during a performance of the Medu Music Band in Rome, Italy. – Reuters

ROME – In a tiny makeshift rehearsal studio in a residential neighborhood of Rome, Nigerian asylum seeker Sylvester Ezeala let slip a smile as he drummed a pair of claves to the mesmeric beat of African reggae.

“I love music. Music is life. It makes you relax and calms your nerves,” said Ezeala, 28, who credits music for obliterating the feelings of loneliness and loss that had brought him to the verge of suicide just a few months earlier.

Ezeala is a member of a band set up by medical charity Doctors for Human Rights (MEDU) to help migrants who experienced torture and extreme violence before fleeing to a new life.

For an increasing number of migrants arriving in Italy bear mental as well as physical scars due to abuse experienced in their country of origin or on their way to Europe, mainly in Libya, according to the Rome-based non-government organization.

MEDU coordinator Alberto Barbieri said most suffer from depression and post-traumatic stress disorder, which can cause nightmares, flashbacks, insomnia, guilt and isolation.

“All together these symptoms seriously impair people’s social, work, affective and interpersonal life and … increase isolation,” said Barbieri.

[ click to continue reading at The Saudi Gazette ]

Posted on August 23, 2017 by Editor

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The Village Voice Gone

from The Hollywood Reporter

End of an Era: Village Voice Will No Longer Be in Print

by Jeremy Barr

The Village Voice’s Aug. 16-22, 2017 issue

The alt-weekly changed ownership in 2015.

Peter Barbey, who purchased The Village Voice in 2015, has decided to no longer produce a print edition of the alt-weekly. The publication, which was once considered an important voice and platform, has long been distributed for free around New York City.

“For more than 60 years, The Village Voice brand has played an outsized role in American journalism, politics, and culture,” Barbey said Tuesday in a prepared statement. “It has been a beacon for progress and a literal voice for thousands of people whose identities, opinions, and ideas might otherwise have been unheard. I expect it to continue to be that and much, much more.”

The Village Voice, like most historically print-focused publications, has struggled with the shift to less-remunerative digital advertising. The paper was once reliant largely on classified advertising.

“That business has moved online — and so has the Voice’s audience, which expects us to do what we do not just once a week, but every day, across a range of media, from words and pictures to podcasts, video, and even other forms of print publishing,” Barbey said.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on August 22, 2017 by Editor

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I love planking.

from VICE

Nude Performance Artist Planks in Philosophical Self-Portraits

by ANDREW NUNES

Afbeeldingen met dank aan de kunstenaar.

Chiara Mazzocchi’s nude artworks are anything but personal.

Though nudity and self-portraiture are staples of the art canon, the way Chiara Mazzocchi incorporates both in her visual and performative works is anything but usual. The Italian artist’s use of her own body is meant to be more than just an exploration of her personal self, instead functioning as an attempt to “express the authenticity of the human being connected and relating with nature and the universe and spaces, as a symbol of purity, energy, and light,” in the artist’s own words.

[ click to continue reading at VICE ]

Posted on August 14, 2017 by Editor

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Jim Carrey – Artist

Jim Carrey: I Needed Color from JC on Vimeo.

Posted on August 13, 2017 by Editor

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Black Metal Blues

Posted on August 11, 2017 by Editor

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Bio-Def

from McClatchy

Dawn of the bionic age: Body hackers let chips get under their skin

BY TIM JOHNSON

Doug Copeland, left, prepares to implant a microchip in the hand of Kyle Spiers at a workshop at the DefCon 2017 convention in Las Vegas July 28, 2017. Hackers who implant microchips are known as “grinders,” a term taken from a comic book. Tim Johnson McClatchy

If you’re prone to forgetting your card key for the office or your computer password, here’s a solution: Get a microchip implanted in your hand.

That’s what Brian McEvoy has done multiple times. He’s got five implants, mostly for functional reasons but one just for fun.

“There’s a glow-in-the-dark implant on the back of my right hand,” said McEvoy, a 36-year-old electrical engineer from St. Paul, Minnesota.

For years, owners have implanted microchips in their pets to recover them if they go astray. Farmers use them in cattle. Now, humans are experimenting with subdermal microchips, which are the size of a large grain of rice, to make modern life easier.

Ever so slowly, a trend that began in the hacker community is moving toward the mainstream. A Wisconsin firm that specializes in designing company break rooms, Three Square Market, announced last month that it was offering implanted chips to all its employees.

[ click to continue reading at McClatchy ]

Posted on August 8, 2017 by Editor

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Late-night Jam @ Walmart

Posted on August 7, 2017 by Editor

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Olga Pronina G

from The Drive

Russian Woman Known as ‘Sexiest Motorcyclist’ on Instagram Killed in High-Speed Crash

“She was breaching every rule of safety and riding at high speed pretty often,” her friend told local media.

BY KYLE CHEROMCHA

Olga was pronounced dead at the scene of the crashOlga was pronounced dead at the scene of the crash

A woman who gained a reputation as the “sexiest motorcyclist” on Instagram thanks to her risque outfits and even riskier style of riding was killed in a high-speed crash in city of Vladivostok, Russia on Monday, according to The Sun.

40-year-old Olga Pronina, known to her followers on Instagram as “Monika,” reportedly died almost instantly when she lost control of her BMW S1000RR while riding down a motorway in the early evening and struck the middle guardrail at high speed. Pictures obtained by The Sun show the bike was basically obliterated.

A friend who arrived on scene minutes later told The Sun that the force of the crash sent the BMW’s rear wheel bouncing almost 2,000 feet further down the road. Another friend told The Sun that Pronina was “was breaching every rule of safety and riding at high-speed pretty often,” adding that her death is “incredibly tragic.”

Pronina had accumulated over 180,000 followers on Instagram, where she posted pictures of herself modeling with various motorcycles and videos showing her rocketing through traffic at speeds over 150 mph while wearing…well, let’s call it insufficient protection for the task at hand.

[ click to continue reading at The Drive ]

Posted on August 6, 2017 by Editor

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Angelyne Identified

from The Hollywood Reporter

The Mystery of L.A. Billboard Diva Angelyne’s Real Identity Is Finally Solved

by Gary Baum

An Angelyne billboard in the 1990s.Scott McKiernan/ZUMA Press/Newscom

Way before Paris Hilton and Kim Kardashian, the enigmatic blonde bombshell was famous for being famous, perpetually driving the streets of Hollywood in that pink Corvette. But her true identity has remained secret all these years … until now.

“Would you be interested in a story on Angelyne’s true identity?” the man wrote last fall under a pseudonym, referring to the enigmatic L.A. billboard diva who has been a pop culture icon of self-creation and self-marketing since the early 1980s — and is now regarded as a forerunner to Paris Hilton, Kim Kardashian and every personal-brand hustler on social media. “I have many details on her life — all well documented — from when her parents met to early adulthood. It’s very different from her public, concocted story — and more interesting.”

Angelyne is one of the vanishingly few contemporary public figures whose background has remained shrouded in mystery, along with the conceptual artist Banksy, Bitcoin founder Satoshi Nakamoto and aircraft hijacker D.B. Cooper. The man, who claimed to work in an undefined role for the federal government, said he was a hobbyist genealogist, occasionally taking on paid assignments in the field as an amusing side gig. A few years earlier, he’d decided it’d be fun to set himself the challenge of cracking Angelyne’s case. “And I did,” he explained.

Later, at the 101 Coffee Shop in Hollywood, the genealogist — who looks like Michael Kelly’s contained political operative Doug Stamper from House of Cards — unfurled an elaborate story of Angelyne’s past, based on material he contended he’d enterprisingly pulled and synthesized from a global network of public databases. He laid down a folded printout of a row of yearbook photos.

[ click to continue reading at THR ]

Posted on August 4, 2017 by Editor

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PAA

Posted on August 3, 2017 by Editor

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Vinyl Jamaica

from The Vinyl Factory

The factory behind Jamaica’s reborn vinyl industry launches crowdfunding campaign

by Gabriela Helfet

A record-pressing plant with historic reggae roots.

Florida-based SunPress Vinyl has launched a crowdfunding campaign to raise money for the expansion of their factory and label.

Read more: Jamaica’s last vinyl factory to start pressing records again

SunPress’ expansion efforts follow recent announcements that new pressing plants are due to open in Japan, Seoul, and Melbourne.

The company is housed in the former Final Vinyl HQ, founded in the 1970s by pioneering Jamaican producer Joe Gibbs. In its previous incarnation the factory was responsible for pressing and distributing all of Studio One’s output, including records from Bob Marley, Toots and the Maytals and Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry.

[ click to continue reading at The Vinyl Factory ]

Posted on August 2, 2017 by Editor

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Sam Shepard Gone

from DEADLINE 

Broadway Will Dim The Lights For Sam Shepard

by Jeremy Gerard

Ben Rothstein/Warner Bros./REX/Shutterstock

On Broadway, Shepard debuted with his contribution to the musical revue Oh! Calcutta! (1969) followed by Operation Sidewinder (1970), a revival of Oh! Calcutta!(1976), Buried Child (1996), True West (2000), and Fool for Love (2015). He received Tony Award nominations in 2000 for True West and 1996 for Buried Child, for which he had earlier been awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama.

“Sam Shepard was a prolific storyteller who created provocative, thoughtful, and exciting work for Broadway, off-Broadway, and film. His original voice was a definite draw for audiences and had an undeniable influence on other artists,” said Charlotte St. Martin, President of the Broadway League. “He will be greatly missed. Our thoughts are with his family, friends, and colleagues.”

PREVIOUSLY with more information: Sam Shepard, whose snaggle-toothed smile, craggy good looks and outlaw style as actor and writer made him an American icon in the mold of Gary Cooper and Marlon Brando, died July 27 at home in Kentucky. He was 73 and had been suffering from ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease. He was surrounded by family at the time of his death, according to Chris Boneau, a family spokesman.

A Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright, actor, author, screenwriter and director, Shepard was nominated for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar for his portrayal of pilot Chuck Yeager in Philip Kaufman’s 1983 film The Right Stuff. The author of 44 plays, he won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1979 for Buried Child and was best known for such works as Fool for LoveTrue West and A Lie of the Mind. In 2009 he was named the PEN/Laura Pels International Foundation for Theater Award as a master American dramatist.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on August 1, 2017 by Editor

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Private Lip-sync

Posted on July 30, 2017 by Editor

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Devil 1980

Posted on July 28, 2017 by Editor

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Russo Bros.

from DEADLINE

Fox Sets Russo Brothers In Co-Finance & WW Distribution Deal For New Movie Projects

by Mike Fleming Jr

Jonathan Hordle/REX/Shutterstock

EXCLUSIVE: Avengers: Infinity War directors Joe and Anthony Russo are zeroing in on a major deal with 20th Century Fox for their unnamed production company that will fully launch in January after they complete back-to-back Avengers sequels. Sources said the Russo Brothers are closing a long term non-exclusive pact for Fox to co-finance and distribute worldwide features generated by the new venture. The company will have put pictures included, and the venture will provide the other half of the financing for its films. I understand there was competition among studios to land the deal.

The Russo Brothers had a comfort level with and respect for Fox film chief Stacey Snider that goes back to her days at Universal. Snider was the entry point, and they met and hit it off with production chief Emma Watts, sources said. The duo has been working on the launch of this venture for over a year, with an eye toward directing films and producing others, and creating a feeder system for emerging talent. The Fox deal will allow them to start as a funded mini-major.

[ click to continue reading at DEADLINE ]

Posted on July 25, 2017 by Editor

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Back-Room Apollo 13

from WIRED

THE UNTOLD STORY OF THE BACK-ROOM TEAM THAT SAVED APOLLO 13

by 

IF EVERYTHING GOES smoothly, nobody remembers your work.

But on April 13, 1970, an oxygen tank explosion aboard the Apollo 13 spacecraft set a harrowing mission into motion—and its success would turn a team of heartland boys into national heroes. A little more than two days into the mission’s voyage to the moon, the command module began to lose its supply of electricity and water. That’s when astronaut John Swigert uttered the phrase that would implant mission control in the public’s consciousness: “Houston, we’ve had a problem here.”

Houston—those working behind the scenes at NASA—is the focus of a new documentary that explores the history of the Apollo space program.

“Most of the attention around Apollo has focused on the astronauts,” says Keith Haviland, a producer of Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo, released last week. “But the film is about those people in the back room at NASA who really made the missions happen through planning, through monitoring the flights, through dealing with emergencies.”

[ click to continue reading at WIRED ]

Posted on July 24, 2017 by Editor

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Alice Cooper’s Electric Chair

from artnet

Alice Cooper Just Realized He Got a Warhol Electric Chair 40 Years Ago and Totally Forgot About It

The discovery could be the first major market test of a new Warhol authentication service.

by Eileen Kinsella

Andy Warhol with Alice Cooper in 1974. Photo by Bob Gruen. Courtesy Bob Gruen.Andy Warhol with Alice Cooper in 1974. Photo by Bob Gruen. Courtesy Bob Gruen.

How rock n’ roll is Alice Cooper? He is so rock n’ roll that he actually forgot about a canvas believed to be by Andy Warhol that he received as a gift in the 1970s and later put into storage.

Soon, that painting will see the light of day again—first in Cooper’s home, and then potentially on the market—thanks to advice from a Los Angeles collector and a San Francisco private dealer.

Back in the early 1970s, when Cooper was touring the world, he typically included an unusual theatrical element in his macabre shock rock act: an actual electric chair. Aware of his fondness for the sinister stage prop, Cooper’s then-girlfriend, Cindy Lang (a model who had appeared on the cover of Andy Warhol’s Interview magazine), bought him an Andy Warhol red electric chair silkscreen in 1974. She paid $2,500 for it.

[ click to continue reading at artnet ]

Posted on July 23, 2017 by Editor

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1978 Bush

Posted on July 21, 2017 by Editor

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Your Daddy Is A Neanderthal

from New Scientist

We may have mated with Neanderthals more than 219,000 years ago

By Aylin Woodward

Ancient human skullsWe have a thing for Neanderthals – ZUMA Press, Inc/Alamy Stock Photo

It’s a sex-laced mystery. If modern humans didn’t reach Europe until about 60,000 years ago, how has DNA from them turned up in a Neanderthal fossil in Germany from 124,000 years ago?

The answer seems to be that there was a previous migration of early humans – more than 219,000 years ago. One that we’re only just starting to reveal from piecemeal evidence that is DNA extracted from fossilised bones.

The story, as far as we knew it, was that the ancestors of modern humans diverged from Neanderthals and Denisovans between 550,000 and 765,000 years ago. While Neanderthals and Denisovans inhabited Eurasia, modern humans stayed in Africa until about 60,000 years ago. Then they entered Europe, too.

[ click to continue reading at New Scientist ]

Posted on July 20, 2017 by Editor

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Bandido

Posted on July 19, 2017 by Editor

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Bodacious

Posted on July 17, 2017 by Editor

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Romero Gone

from Deadline Hollywood

George A. Romero Dies: ‘Night Of The Living Dead’ Director Was 77

by Greg Evans

George A. Romero, the director who all but invented the modern zombie genre with his 1968 horror classic Night of the Living Dead, has died at 77 of lung cancer.

Infused with social commentary and a realistic, midnight-movie terror, Romero’s brazenly stark thriller, and the sequels that followed, made as large an impact on the genre and a culture’s nightmares as any horror film since the Universal Studios monster chillers of the 1930s.

The Pittsburgh native’s low-budget, black and white film went from cult favorite to blockbuster franchise with Romero’s 1978 sequel Dawn of the Dead, 1985’s Day of the Dead (1985), Land of the Dead (2005), Diary of the Dead (2007) and finally 2009’s Survival of the Dead. His take on the vampire genre, Martin, was released in 1978, and he wrote the 1990 Night remake, directed by Tom Savini.

As a producer, Romero delivered TV’s seminal 1980s horror anthology Tales From the Dark Side.

“Hard to quantify how much he inspired me & what he did for cinema,” tweeted Hostel director Eli Roth. (See other Hollywood reactions here.)

[ click to read full obit at Deadline ]

Posted on July 16, 2017 by Editor

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